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Matti Narkia

Differences in vitamin D status between countries in young adults and the elderly - 0 views

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    Differences in vitamin D status between countries in young adults and the elderly.
    McKenna MJ.
    Am J Med. 1992 Jul;93(1):69-77.
    PMID: 1385673

    PURPOSE: To compare vitamin D status between countries in young adults and in the elderly. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Reports on vitamin D status (as assessed by serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D) from 1971 to 1990 were reviewed. Studies were grouped according to geographic regions: North America (including Canada and the United States); Scandinavia (including Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden); and Central and Western Europe (including Belgium, France, Germany, Ireland, The Netherlands, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom). RESULTS: Vitamin D status varies with the season in young adults and in the elderly, and is lower during the winter in Europe than in both North America and Scandinavia. Oral vitamin D intake is lower in Europe than in both North America and Scandinavia. Hypovitaminosis D and related abnormalities in bone chemistry are most common in elderly residents in Europe but are reported in all elderly populations. CONCLUSIONS: The vitamin D status in young adults and the elderly varies widely with the country of residence. Adequate exposure to summer sunlight is the essential means to ample supply, but oral intake augmented by both fortification and supplementation is necessary to maintain baseline stores. All countries should adopt a fortification policy. It seems likely that the elderly would benefit additionally from a daily supplement of 10 micrograms of vitamin D.
Matti Narkia

Wintertime vitamin D insufficiency is common in young Canadian women, and their vitamin... - 0 views

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    Wintertime vitamin D insufficiency is common in young Canadian women, and their vitamin D intake does not prevent it.
    Vieth R, Cole DE, Hawker GA, Trang HM, Rubin LA.
    Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 Dec;55(12):1091-7.
    PMID: 11781676

    INTERPRETATION: The self-reported vitamin D intake from milk and/or multivitamins does not relate to prevention of low vitamin D nutritional status of young women in winter. Recommended vitamin D intakes are too small to prevent insufficiency. Vitamin D nutrition can only be assessed by measuring serum 25(OH)D concentration.
Matti Narkia

Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin D and Calcium - Institute of Medicine - 0 views

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    Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin D and Calcium

    An IOM committee has been named to undertake a study to assess current relevant data and update as appropriate the DRIs for vitamin D and calcium. The review will include consideration of chronic and non-chronic disease indicators. The study will also incorporate, as appropriate, systematic evidence-based reviews of the literature and an assessment of potential indicators of adequacy and of excess intake. Indicators for adequacy and excess will be selected based on the strength and quality of the evidence and the demonstrated public health significance, taking into consideration sources of uncertainty in the evidence.
Matti Narkia

Response -- Schwalfenberg 53 (9): 1435 -- Canadian Family Physician - 0 views

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    Vitamin D supplementation.
    Eveleigh B.
    Can Fam Physician. 2007 Sep;53(9):1435; author reply 1435.
    PMID: 17872869

    My concern regarding vitamin D2 is that it is a synthetic analogue and might interact with the vitamin D receptor differently in various cell systems. It has been reported that vitamin D3 might improve glycemic control.7 Vitamin D2 has been reported to cause worsening of glycemic control in people of East Indian descent.8 Is this because of vitamin D receptor polymorphism, or because of enhanced 24-hydroxylase enzyme activation, or is it due to how vitamin D2 interacts with the receptor? Until this has been sorted out, I feel safest using vitamin D3. There are about 2000 synthetic analogues of vitamin D. The search is on for one that can cross the blood-brain barrier to treat certain types of brain cancers without causing hypercalcemia.9 But then again, what other effects would this compound have? There are still so many unknowns
Matti Narkia

Not enough vitamin D: Health consequences for Canadians -- Schwalfenberg 53 (5): 841 --... - 0 views

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    Not enough vitamin D: health consequences for Canadians.
    Schwalfenberg G.
    Can Fam Physician. 2007 May;53(5):841-54. Review
    PMID: 17872747

    Conclusion

    Low levels of VTD are considered a major public health problem in Canada, especially during the winter. Those with risk factors should be screened for low 25(OH)D levels and repletion therapy instituted if needed. Researchers have estimated that the oral dose of vitamin D3 to attain and maintain 25(OH)D levels >80 nmol/L is 2200 IU/d if baseline levels are 20 to 40 nmol/L, 1800 IU/d if levels are 40 to 60 nmol/L, and 1160 IU/d if levels are between 60 and 80 nmol/L.64

    We need to ensure that patients have healthy blood levels of 25(OH)D to prevent levels of parathyroid hormone from rising and to maximize absorption of calcium, magnesium, and phosphate. Positive effects on bone are marginal at best unless patients consume at least 800 IU/d of VTD. The emerging and exciting role of the VTD receptor and the actions of VTD in maintaining health in other cell types have become more apparent during the last decade.
Matti Narkia

Not enough vitamin D: health consequences for Canadians. - Can Fam Physician. 2007 May - 0 views

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    Not enough vitamin D: health consequences for Canadians.\nSchwalfenberg G.\nCan Fam Physician. 2007 May;53(5):841-54. Review.\nPMID: 17872747 \n
Matti Narkia

the Vitamin D Society - 0 views

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    Our vision: To significantly improve the health of Canadians through the preventative health strategy of maintaining optimum vitamin D blood levels.
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