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Study highlights bullying in schools | The Australian - 0 views

  • ALMOST three quarters of year 9 schoolboys admit to "covert bullying", according to a world-first Australian study.

    The survey of almost 800 Victorian students found 72 per cent of year 9 boys and 65 per cent of year 9 girls had engaged in covert bullying, such as spreading rumours or excluding other children.

    Lead researcher, Professor Sheryl Hemphill, said it was surprising to find more boys than girls engaging in this type of bullying.

    "Covert bullying was always thought to be predominantly done by girls, but our figures show for the first time that boys are actively engaging in this behaviour," she said.

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Aussie Government Launches Anti-Bullying Web Site - International Business Times - 0 views

  • Education authorities in Australia rolled out on Friday an anti-bullying Web site that offers to children and parents fact on bullying and tips on how to deal with it.
  • The Bullying No Way! Portal features a choose-you-own adventure game that teaches student ways to deal with bullying and offers moderate for a where the kids could talk about their problems with fellow children. It could be found at www.bullyingnoway.gov.au.
  • The Web site, which was launched by the Council of Australian Education Ministers, will also make available an iPhone app called Take A Stand that will grant students access to information about bullying and ways to deal with the school problem.
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  • Australian Medical Association President Dr Steve Hambleton added that cyberbullying causes more harm than traditional playground bullying.

    "Cyberbullying doesn't stop at three o'clock in the afternoon when school finishes. It keeps going," he warned.

Teachers Without Borders

High schools join the fight against depression - 0 views

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    Distinguishing between mood disorders and the normal difficulties of adolescence is not always easy, but a new program has been developed by the institute to give teachers and students a better understanding of mental health issues.

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    The HeadStrong program uses classroom activities to share information and prompt discussions on depression and bipolar disorders, at-risk personality types, coping strategies and where to get support.

    The institute will train 1500 high school teachers across Australia in the HeadStrong teaching resource over the next three years. It will reach 90,000 students, with a focus on those in rural and remote locations.
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Words come to life when they're at your fingertips - 1 views

  • Dominic, 6, from St Mary's Primary School in Erskineville, is one of the students whose command of technology is being harnessed in the trial use of iPads to boost literacy skills.

    Teachers in the Sydney Catholic diocese are trialling the iPads with children in reading recovery, a remedial program for year 1 students, with encouraging results.

  • The trial is in its early stages but integrating the iPad into lessons ''seems to unleash an engagement in learning, an increase in motivation and previously unseen independence in the reading and writing process''.
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Coburn Primary School's Anti-Bullying Program - 0 views

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    Hundreds of schools throughout Australia take part in the program, which is designed to create caring primary schools and help prevent bullying.

    ''Our grade five and six students and newly welcomed preps will be buddied up for the year to learn off each other and support each other in what can be a difficult community with a number of social issues,'' says grade 6 teacher Stephen Carlton.

    He says while bullying has not been an inherent problem at Coburn Primary, the school wanted to take a proactive approach, which would also equip the older students with leadership skills and confidence for high school.
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School's in for finances - 0 views

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    Children can no longer afford to be ignorant of how complex financial products work.

    The world of finance and money is becoming rapidly more complex and requires an integration of education and safe financial products to ensure children grow up knowing how to manage money and debt.

    From this year, financial literacy will be included in the national school curriculum and will be rolled out across a range of subjects during the next three years.
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National curriculum gets our history badly wrong - 0 views

  • Take, for example, the history syllabus. After a full quota of compulsory schooling, Australian students will be none the wiser about the origins and central tenets of liberalism: the basics of individual rights, representative democracy and the market economy, and the importance of civil society.

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but these are the absolute fundamentals of Western civilisation. And they are missing from the national curriculum.

Teachers Without Borders

me.edu.au - Dr James Page - 0 views

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    Dr James Page is an Australian educationist. Dr Page holds a PhD in peace education, and is currently Australian co-ordinator for a research survey examining social attitudes to peace and war.
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