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Donna Baumbach

MashPlant - MashPlant.com Studio - 15 views

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    "MashPlant Studio is a 21st century education tool that promotes creativity and collaboration in your classroom and at home." Read more here http://blog.findingdulcinea.com/2013/03/introducing-mashplant.html  "Teachers create one or more studios - small, private social networks - and invite their students to join via assignments on the teacher's blog. Teachers maintain a degree of control to keep order if necessary."
Ellen Robinette

Collaborize Classroom Topic Library - 1 views

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    Offers suggested blog/discussion topics organized by school subject.
Brenda Anderson

http://willrichardson.com/ - 22 views

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    Will Richardson's new blogging site.
Judy O'Connell

Blogging with Students - 16 views

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    As you might well know I am really enthusiastic about blogging with students. I have shared my adventures through several opportunities and I'm determined to keep spreading the word in order to bring other educators on board. Therefore, I have created a LiveBinder with useful tools, examples and resources. I thought this would be a good idea to encourage other teachers to get their kids blogging
Jamie Camp

Mrs. Yollis' Classroom Blog: How to Compose a Quality Comment! - 0 views

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    This is an excellent explanation of how to make a quality comment on a blog that will extend the conversation. Intro'd by the tchr, and explained by the students (about 2nd gr?)
Bright Ideas

We Love Learning - 9 views

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    Classroom teacher Nicole McMahon at St Luke the Evangelist School in Blackburn has developed a blog for her Prep class.
Donna Baumbach

Looking to Ramp Up Your Library Web Site? Try a Blog. - 2 views

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    whys and hows of using blogs in a school library media center - 1/1/2010 - School Library Journal
Pam Jeffrey

Digitally Speaking / Blogging - 7 views

  • Using Feed Readers

     

    Feed readers are probably the most important digital tool for today's learner because they make sifting through the amazing amount of content added to the Internet easy.  Also known as aggregators, feed readers are free tools that can automatically check nearly any website for new content dozens of times a day---saving ridiculous amounts of time and customizing learning experiences for anyone. 

     

    Imagine never having to go hunting for new information from your favorite sources again.  Learning goes from a frustrating search through thousands of marginal links written by questionable characters to quickly browsing the thoughts of writers that you trust, respect and enjoy.

     

    Sounds too good to be true, doesn't it?

     

    It's not!  Here's a Commoncraft tutorial explaining RSS Feeds in Plain English:

     

    Feed readers can quickly and easily support blogging in the classroom, allowing teachers to provide students with ready access to age-appropriate sites of interest that are connected to the curriculum.  By collecting sites in advance and organizing them with a feed reader, teachers can make accessing information manageable for their students. 

    Here are several examples of feed readers in action:

     

    Student Blogs

    http://www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/20982438

     

     

    This feed list includes several elementary, middle and high school blogs that students can explore during silent reading or while online at home.

     

     

    Current Events 

    http://www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/16714925

     

    This feed list includes links to several news websites that cover topics that are a part of one teacher's required social studies curriculum. 

     

    Global Warming

    http://www.pageflakes.com/wferriter/22534539

    Used specifically as a part of one classroom project, this feed list contains information related to global warming that students can use as a starting point for individual research. 

     

    While there are literally dozens of different feed reader programs to choose from (Bloglines and Google Reader are two biggies), Pageflakes is a favorite of many educators because it has a visual layout that is easy to read and interesting to look at.  It is also free and web-based.  That means that users can check accounts from any computer with an Internet connection.  Finally, Pageflakes makes it quick and easy to add new websites to a growing feed list—and to get rid of any websites that users are no longer interested in.

    What's even better:  Pageflakes has been developing a teacher version of their tool just for us that includes an online grade tracker, a task list and a built in writing tutor.  As Pageflakes works to perfect its teacher product, this might become one of the first kid-friendly feed readers on the market. Teacher Pageflakes users can actually blog and create a discussion forum directly in their feed reader---making an all-in-one digital home for students. 

     

    For more information about the teacher version of Pageflakes, check out this review:

     

    http://teacherleaders.typepad.com/the_tempered_radical/2008/02/pageflakes-for.html

     

     

    For more information on using feed readers to organize and manage information, check out this handout: 

Donna Baumbach

Nik's Quick Shout: How to Sheets - 0 views

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    * How to create online presentations and import videos from YouTube using 280Slides * How to create an online journal using Penzu.com * How to create and change the appearance of word clouds using Wordle * How to create an animated movie using Dvolver"
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