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Leslie Holwerda

E-learning tools and resources for schools and education - Mind Map - 0 views

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    links and info on many (all) etools
Dennis OConnor

E-Learning and Online Teaching | Scoop.it - 15 views

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    Hi impact, curated magazine of articles and professional resources for those interested in e-learning and online teaching. Published by Dennis O'Connor, Program Advisor for the University of Wisconsin Stout E-Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate Program.
Antonietta Neighbour

Assessment in the Digital Age: Fair Measures? - 17 views

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    This presentation was delivered by Steve Wheeler, Associate Professor of learning technology at the University of Plymouth, during his keynote address at the eAssessment Scotland Conference.  Well worth a watch!
Dennis OConnor

E-Learning Graduate Certificate Program: Horizon Report 2011 E-Learning Relevent Research - 0 views

  • The 2011 Horizon Report is a collaboration between The New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative
  • Executive Summary Overview
Dennis OConnor

Fair Use Teaching Tools | Center for Social Media - 0 views

  • The Center for Social Media has created a set of teaching tools for professors who are interested in teaching their students about fair use. The tools include powerpoints with lecture notes, guidelines for in-class discussions and exercises, assignments and grading rubrics. We hope you'll find them useful!
  • These powerpoints with lecture notes were designed to help professors teach students the basic information they need to understand how to use fair use when making documentary fllms and online videos
  • Fair Use Scenarios: (To be used with the Documentary Filmmakers' Statement of Best Practices in Fair Use) Here are 4 filmmaking scenarios where students are called upon to determine whether they have a fair use right to use certain copyrighted footage, and if there are limits to that right.
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  • Here are two sets of fair use clips for professors to use for in-class discussio
  • Here are guidelines for a short video production assignment that requires students to incorporate copyrighted material into a video and defend the decisions they make using the Code of Best Practices in Online Video.
  • Additionally, here is an assignment, similar to the discussion prompts above, that requires students to articulate why a video clip is fair use.
  • Here is a collection of videos that do a good job of explaining the Codes of Best Practices and the idea of Fair Use:
beth gourley

Gutenberg 2.0 | Harvard Magazine May-Jun 2010 - 10 views

  • Her staff offers a complete suite of information services to students and faculty members, spread across four teams. One provides content or access to it in all its manifestations; another manages and curates information relevant to the school’s activities; the third creates Web products that support teaching, research, and publication; and the fourth group is dedicated to student and faculty research and course support. Kennedy sees libraries as belonging to a partnership of shared services that support professors and students. “Faculty don’t come just to libraries [for knowledge services],” she points out. “They consult with experts in academic computing, and they participate in teaching teams to improve pedagogy. We’re all part of the same partnership and we have to figure out how to work better together.”
  • It’s not that we don’t need libraries or librarians,” he continues, “it’s that what we need them for is slightly different. We need them to be guides in this increasingly complex world of information and we need them to convey skills that most kids actually aren’t getting at early ages in their education. I think librarians need to get in front of this mob and call it a parade, to actually help shape it.”
  • Her staff offers a complete suite of information services to students and faculty members, spread across four teams. One provides content or access to it in all its manifestations; another manages and curates information relevant to the school’s activities; the third creates Web products that support teaching, research, and publication; and the fourth group is dedicated to student and faculty research and course support. Kennedy sees libraries as belonging to a partnership of shared services that support professors and students. “Faculty don’t come just to libraries [for knowledge services],” she points out. “They consult with experts in academic computing, and they participate in teaching teams to improve pedagogy. We’re all part of the same partnership and we have to figure out how to work better together.”
    • beth gourley
       
      Good summary of differentiating library services and the need to accommodate staffing. Ultimatley makes for the teaching partnership.
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  • “The digital world of content is going to be overwhelming for librarians for a long time, just because there is so much,” she acknowledges. Therefore, librarians need to teach students not only how to search, but “how to think critically about what they have found…what they are missing… and how to judge their sources.” 
  • But making comparisons between digital and analog libraries on issues of cost or use or preservation is not straightforward. If students want to read a book cover to cover, the printed copy may be deemed superior with respect to “bed, bath and beach,” John Palfrey points out. If they just want to read a few pages for class, or mine the book for scattered references to a single subject, the digital version’s searchability could be more appealing; alternatively, students can request scans of the pages or chapter they want to read as part of a program called “scan and deliver” (in use at the HD and other Harvard libraries) and receive a link to images of the pages via e-mail within four days. 
  • (POD) would allow libraries to change their collection strategies: they could buy and print a physical copy of a book only if a user requested it. When the user was done with the book, it would be shelved. It’s a vision of “doing libraries ‘just in time’ rather than ‘just in case,’” says Palfrey. (At the Harvard Book Store on Massachusetts Avenue, a POD machine dubbed Paige M. Gutenborg is already in use. Find something you like in Google’s database of public-domain books—perhaps one provided by Harvard—and for $8 you can own a copy, printed and bound before your wondering eyes in minutes. Clear Plexiglas allows patrons to watch the process—hot glue, guillotine-like trimming blades, and all—until the book is ejected, like a gumball, from a chute at the bottom.)
  • We’re rethinking the physical spaces to accommodate more of the type of learning that is expected now, the types of assignments that faculty are making, that have two or three students huddled around a computer working together, talking.” 
  • Libraries are also being used as social spaces,
  • In terms of research, students are asking each other for information more now than in the past, when they might have asked a librarian.
  • On the contrary, the whole history of books and communication shows that one medium does not displace another.
  • it’s not just a service organization. I would even go so far as to call it the nervous system of our corporate body.”
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    "This defines a new role for librarians as database experts and teachers, while the library becomes a place for learning about sophisticated search for specialized information."
    "How do we make information as useful as possible to our community now and over a long period of time?"
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