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Erich Feldmeier

Strassmann & Queller: Close family ties keep cheaters in check: Why almost all multicel... - 0 views

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    ""Experiments with amoebae that usually live as individuals but must also join with others to form multicellular bodies to complete their life cycles showed that cooperation depends on kinship.

    If amoebae occur in well-mixed cosmopolitan groups, then cheaters will always be able to thrive by freeloading on their cooperative neighbors. But if groups derive from a single cell, cheaters will usually occur in all-cheater groups and will have no cooperators to exploit. A multicellular body like the human body is an incredibly cooperative thing," Queller says, "and sociobiologists have learned that really cooperative things are hard to evolve because of the potential for cheating.

    "It's the single-cell bottleneck that generates high relatedness among the cells that, in turn, allows them to cooperate, " he says."
Walid Damouny

Acting selfish? Blame your mother - 0 views

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    (PhysOrg.com) -- The fact that our female ancestors dispersed more than our male ancestors can lead to conflicts within the brain that influence our social behaviour, new research reveals.
Walid Damouny

1 gene lost = 1 limb regained? Scientists demonstrate mammalian regeneration through si... - 1 views

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    "A quest that began over a decade ago with a chance observation has reached a milestone: the identification of a gene that may regulate regeneration in mammals. The absence of this single gene, called p21, confers a healing potential in mice long thought to have been lost through evolution and reserved for creatures like flatworms, sponges, and some species of salamander. In a report published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from The Wistar Institute demonstrate that mice that lack the p21 gene gain the ability to regenerate lost or damaged tissue."
Walid Damouny

A better genetic test for autism - 2 views

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    "A large study from Children's Hospital Boston and the Boston-based Autism Consortium finds that a genetic test that samples the entire genome, known as chromosomal microarray analysis, has about three times the detection rate for genetic changes related to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) than standard tests. Publishing in the April issue of Pediatrics (and online March 15), the authors urge that CMA become part of the first-line genetic work-up for ASDs."
Walid Damouny

US scientists warn of fraud of stem cell 'banks' - 0 views

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    "Clinics that offer to "bank" stem cells from the umbilical cords of newborns for use later in life when illness strikes are fraudsters, a top US scientist said here Saturday."
Charles Daney

Genes That Make Us Human -- ScienceNOW - 0 views

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    Finding genes that have evolved in humans among our genome's 3 billion bases is no easy feat. But now, a team has pinpointed three genes that arose from noncoding DNA and may help make our species unique.
Maluvia Haseltine

Scitable | Learn Science at Nature - 0 views

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    A free science library and personal learning tool brought to you by Nature Publishing Group, the world's leading publisher of science.
Walid Damouny

Telomeres resemble DNA fragile sites - 0 views

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    Telomeres, the repetitive sequences of DNA at the ends of linear chromosomes, have an important function: They protect vulnerable chromosome ends from molecular attack. Researchers at Rockefeller University now show that telomeres have their own weakness. They resemble unstable parts of the genome called fragile sites where DNA replication can stall and go awry. But what keeps our fragile telomeres from falling apart is a protein that ensures the smooth progression of DNA replication to the end of a chromosome.
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