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wayupnorth

Who is in #Rhizo15? - 1 views

Jaap Bosman

Choreographies of Becoming | Personal Research Blog - 0 views

shared by Jaap Bosman on 22 Apr 15 - No Cached
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    This paper centers what I consider to be an important question: As educators in the 21st century, what is our ethical responsibility in relation to human technological subjectification? As digital technologies proliferate, thinking through the ethics of becoming-digital is of paramount importance for college student educators.
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    about subjectification and socialization
Kevin Hodgson

The Essence of Peopling - 4 views

  • “People”
    • Terry Elliott
       
      To talk about  "people" is to objectify and alienate. Making nouns of anything is a way to separate them from the world.
  • “peopling”
    • Terry Elliott
       
      "Peopling" on the other hand is about human folk connecting to the world--subjectifying and unshackling the word.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      to people?
  • The first part of this essay is an account of innermost peopling – the social, self-conscious nature of human cognition. The second part of this essay moves outward, connecting cognition to the rituals and social information flows that make up the most important parts of our environment.

  • ...19 more annotations...
  • In Others in Mind: The Social Origins of Self-Consciousness (one of my favorite books of all time), Philippe Rochat presents a social model of human cognition,
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Social model of human knowings v. Cartesian knowing
  • Rochat, in contrast, models human cognition as fundamentally social in nature. Each person learns to be aware of himself – is constrained toward self-consciousness – by other people being aware of him. He learns to manage his image in the minds of others, and finds himself reflected, as in a mirror, through the interface of language and non-verbal communication.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      We learn to become self-aware, we are "constrained" toward that goal by other folk.  Other folk are our first mirrors through non-verbal then oral and then written "interfaces".
  • infinite recursion
  • infinite recursion
    • Terry Elliott
       
      We see ourselves through the constraining influences of other people, through the 'peopling' of others.  Others people us.  It is a limited recursion.  I think this has significance in #rhizo15. How? We are all seeing ourselves through the eyes of others.  How accurate is that subjective view?  Sometimes it is off by degrees of magnitude.  For example, I see some pretty effusive praise for stuff that by its nature is half-baked.  Yes, some is very good for a first draft, but most goes little past the initial draft and into further revision.  I expect further recursion, further refinement through reciprocal action, sometimes I get it, mostly I don't. Part of me take no offense while another part is deeply disturbed that the responses I get are so cursory.  And the cursory nature of most responses,  the desultory considerations of others we have come to respect become the default.  And, worse, they become internalized as the default mutual mental modeling.  Shallow of necessity, quick by force of circumstance, and a bare reciprocal exigency.  
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      How much of that is on other people? How much of it is on us? How inviting are we to gather up ideas, particularly those who challenge our thinking? That "infinite" word in there .. that's a lot of recursive thinking going back and forth, toppling on itself ...
  • The self is not unitary and separate from others; peopling occurs in the context of mutual-mental-modeling relationships, which continue to affect each person when he is alone.
  • Each person’s self is spread out among many people, simulated in all their brains at varying levels of granularity. And each person has a different “self” for each one of the people he knows, and a different self for every social context.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Therefore, we have different subjective reflections from among different folk.  Each reflection is a unique self simulated by another's mind.  The same is true for social context.  We have a Rhizo15 self created by our Rhizo15 folk.  My question here is whether it is in any way an objective measure and does that matter?   Should any of us care about the simulations of others?  Should we rebel and subvert these simulacra because they are not 'us'?  It is hard to argue for this position simply because this acceptance of the peopling of others seems quite natural.  It is natural for us to consider this subjective and recursive view from others as the real deal.  Or is it just the default view?  Can we generate another way toward identity that is a balance between outer and inner subjectivity?
  • The self at work is different from the self at home with close friends, or in bed with a spouse. And none of these are the “true self” – rather, the self exists in all these, and in the transitions between them. There can never be one single, public self; to collapse all these multiple selves together would be akin to social death.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      We are many selves.  No one reflection gets them all not even our own. Especially not our own.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      This reminds me of how to think of our students -- of their lives outside of our classroom,our building ... what literacies are authentic for them?
  • Mentally maintaining one’s identity in relation to others, including one’s accurate social status and relationships in each case, is the core task of being human.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Powerful assertion here.  And the proof is in asking what happens when we do not maintain that identity.
  • a huge portion of our internal cognitive machinery, of which we are not normally aware, is concerned with the ordinary function of maintaining one’s own identity and that of others
    • Terry Elliott
       
      I wonder how much of our cognitive load is spent maintaining (breaking down and building up) identity, the metabolism of identity?
  • Baumeister and Masicampo posit that interfacing between identities – both within a single mind, and between minds – is the purpose of conscious thought (Conscious Thought Is for Facilitating Social and Cultural Interactions: How Mental Simulations Serve the Animal–Culture Interface). And just as Rochat proposes that we are “constrained toward consciousness” by others, Kevin Simler says that we “infect” each other with personhood.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Three views of this social model of cognition:
      1. Baumeister and Masicampo: conscious thought is the transport mechanism for moving between inner identity and outer identity.
      2.Rochat: we become conscious because of others, 'constrained by folk' in order to be.
      3. Simler: we infect each other with consciousness through the interaction of identity.
  • There is a profound irreconcilability or dissonance between first-and third-person perspectives on the self once objectified and valued. This dissonance shapes behaviors in crucial ways, as individuals try to reconcile their own and others’ putative representations about them. These two representational systems are always at some odds or in conflict, always in need of readjustment. It is so because these systems are open, and they do not share the same informational resources: direct, permanent, and embodied for the first-person perspective on the self; indirect, more fleeting, and disembodied for the third-person perspective on the self.

    A main property of this dissonance is that it tends to feed into itself and can reach overwhelming proportions in the life of individuals. More often than not, this dissonance is a major struggle, expressed in the nuisance of self-conscious behaviors that hinder creativity and the smooth “flow” of interpersonal exchanges.

    Others in Mind, p. 41

    • Terry Elliott
       
      I have never seen the problem of identity so succinctly put.  And it explains why there is and can be no permanent solution to the conflict here except perhaps the meditative one of observing the breath and making that identity.
  • People are able to accomplish this feat of mutual simulation by use of two tools: language and ritual. Ritual allows for the communication of information that language can’t convey – hard-to-fake costly signals of commitment, dependability, harmoniousness, and cooperative intent.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      So how do we play this infinite game of mutually modelling each other's identities to each the other?

      Language and ritual

      Language for the easy stuff and ritual for the hard stuff.

      So what are the #rhizo15 rituals?
  • If humans are somehow calibrated to expect a constant flow of social information, then the sparseness of ritual and social participation in modern environments might trigger a cascade of rumination.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      The sparseness of ritual environment in rhizo15 is very painful to me.  The sparseness of feedback from language is just as painful, but the lack of ritual makes it even more so.  Dreadfully more so.  In fact I am on the edge of withdrawing all the time.  I think it is the ritual that will save me.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      So bring on the salve of ritual to rhizo15.
  • A very simple example is greetings. “Greeting everyone you see” is a candidate for a ritual universal, a part of the ritual atmosphere that displays good fit with peopling
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Ritual 1: greeting everyone, every day.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Ritual 2:"Serene Social Sloth Sunday, a made-up internet holiday in which we avoid posting "outrage porn" 
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Ritual 3: Breaking Bread Together
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Ritual 4:  Share natural spaces through YouTube, make part of any group meeting e.g. Hangout.  
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Ritual 5: "With joy and zest, publicly celebrate milestones and recurring events. Affirming shared history, we nourish community, crystallize a sense of accomplishment, and build group identity by unifying our stories and common goals. Can be planned and ritualized, or as spontaneous as a group cheer."  Celebrate | Group Works. (n.d.). Retrieved April 19, 2015, from http://groupworksdeck.org/patterns/Celebrate
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Ritual 6:  Feedforward with the imagination.  In other words project your self into the future and 'recall' all that 'happened' from the beginning of #rhizo15.  In a way I think this defines what rhizomatic learning is.  Each of us creates identity for the group by being who we are with the voices we have.  Why not imagine that forth along with others instead of relying solely upon the weekly proddings of one person identified as 'teacher/leader'.  Feedforwardings would allow us to compare rhizomatic identities. and from there decide where we might go as a group as well as individually.
  • Information about the self from the first-person perspective tends to be inflated and self-aggrandizing; information about the self from the third-person perspective, projected into the minds of others, tends to be deflated and self-deprecatory.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Intriguing ...
  • A freeway is useful for getting from place to place, but it’s not a place to merely exist in the moment.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Interesting, since the "internet highway" was an early metaphor for technology and online elements .. and now we are working on ways to slow down, be more reflective, plant flowers along the ugly underpasses of the freeway
  • “we’re here to fart around together.”
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Is this a motto of Rhizomatic Learning communities? Ha
  • In conclusion, drink tea, together with your friends; pay attention to the tea, and to your friends, and pay attention to your friends paying attention to the tea. Therein lies the meaning of life.
  •  
    There are also linguistic differences...for example, the verb vs noun thing does not work the same in Spanish (and perhaps to some extent in other Romance languages as in English, where verbs are the power words. Syntax and the role of particles-prefixes are other factors.
Kevin Hodgson

Careertography - 1 views

  • decentralise people’s attention and (interestingly) to allow multiple viewpoints (even disagreements)
  • In a rhizomatic museum, visitors can add meaning to exhibitions
  • we need to think of new ways to engage with students and make them active participants in their career thinking.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • we need to break through this cultural baggage earlier. Changing our own culture in order to allow student voices to have an equal value to our own could be part of this.
  • moving out of our own space to meet students in theirs. The rhizome cannot be contained
  • In a recent post about learning spaces, Peter Bryant makes the point that learning occurs where people happen to be
  • Wherever “people congregate and share”
  • shift from a transactional to connections model
  • help students make their own connections, create their own career knowledge and take their own lines of flight
  • In a rhizomatic careers centre, however, there should be a way for students to add their own knowledge to these. Interactive workshops/discussions in the centre (rather than in a separate space) based around the displays? Giving space for students to add their own observations and comments within the display or to create their own? In this sense, the displays need to ask questions rather than present facts. They should stimulate discussion.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      This would be more inclusive, more interactive, more meaningful, right?
  •  
    "What would a rhizomatic careers centre look like?"
Kevin Hodgson

Smoothness and Striation in Digital Learning Spaces - 1 views

    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Smooth space/striated space ... which allows for freedom of movement/creativity?
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    a few folks were annotating this ...
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    a few folks were annotating this ...
Kevin Hodgson

Vialogues : Bring on the (open learning) Revolution - 1 views

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    come annotate the video
Jaap Bosman

Neil Gaiman - Inspirational Commencement Speech at the University of the Arts 2012 - Yo... - 0 views

shared by Jaap Bosman on 22 Apr 15 - No Cached
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    about how to find the way without objectives.
Vanessa Vaile

The Art of Perception - 0 views

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    "Can the power of art change the way you do your job and see the world around you?

    Countless law-enforcement officials, medical professionals and business executives across the country are learning to sharpen their observation, perception and communication skills from an unorthodox teacher. 

    "The Art of Perception," is a groundbreaking, museum-based seminar using fine art analytical methods to strengthen general observation skills. Founder Amy Herman created the program over 12 years ago while working at the Frick Collection in New York City. She intended to enhance medical students' observation skills with patients.  "
Vanessa Vaile

Aldon Hynes #rhizo15 Paper.li - 2 views

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     collecting the #rhizo hashtag
Jaap Bosman

Google Drive Folder View Link rhizo15_community_activities - 3 views

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    Google drive #rhizo15 activity
simonwarren

It's amazing what happens over coffee: or deterritoralising the curriculum (a #rhizo15 ... - 7 views

  • coffee
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      I am drinking coffee as I read this ... sort of drink symmetry going on right now ....
  • my first full academic year in the job
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      I am curious if this newness is freeing or is it constricting? Can you try new things or are you expected to toe the line? I suppose it depends on the "boss man" in charge.
    • simonwarren
       
      Well, a mixture really.  It is 'my' course but that doesn't mean it is always viewed that way by those upstairs - this is a very small unit and can be claustrophobic at times.  Dealing with a bit of a culture of talking the talk but not necessarily walking the walk.  If you get what I mean.  It depends how assertive I wish to be.
  • My recent engagement with digital scholarship and #connectedlearning has propelled me to consider other options, and to think about how I might hack my own course, hybridise it.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      This is the heart of all this connected work ... how do we bring our explorations of learning in online spaces and adventures back into the classroom (unless you teach online courses, of course).
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • sets of resources organised around difficult ideas
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      I like this phrasing and the idea here ... of shifting the learning, as long as you don't focus on the tool/technology but on the learnings elements. Sometimes, the tech drives the learning, not the other way around. We want our students to have agency of exploration in their learning.
    • simonwarren
       
      This year we used the closed box of the institutional VLE to do some of this work but I want to push this further by using more open platforms and ask participants to find their own materials. The assessment will have to be tweaked to facilitate this.
  • have shorter workshops that model many of the ideas we promote
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      This might up the engagement factor. I think a few folks from Connected Courses are tinkering with collective design of curriculum, right? Of allowing students to have a say in the learning. This is what Dave is doing with us. I think.
    • simonwarren
       
      The 'time' allocated to 'teaching' sessions is driven by the Bologna process (Tuning in N.America) and 'European Credit and Accumulation Transfer System' which usually gets reduced to 'time on task' rather than learning.  We can play with this though
  • Emergent objectives could become points for reflecting on what the course should be dealing with, what the difficult ideas and issues are, and therefore the content required.
  • I am after all a final arbiter, the one who, institutionally, is responsible for assessment
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Always a struggle, no matter the age of student (says the sixth grade teacher).
  • working with the play of smooth and striated space.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Thanks for the deep thinking ...
  • Also, could we introduce aspects of peer review?
    • Sarah Honeychurch
       
      I always like peer review
  • @davecormier
    • Sarah Honeychurch
       
      It was me actually :)
H DeWaard

Subjectifying my Learning! Reflecting Allowed - 2 views

  •  
    I have no idea how Dave Cormier does it, but before the offical #rhizo15 start date, there r already 1,000 tweets, an active fb group, an open learning recipe doc with more than 10 collaborators an...
  •  
    Good thinkers draw you in ..
Kevin Hodgson

Teaching Beyond Tropes: Subjective-Learning Subjugated-Objectives Subversive-Subjunctives - 5 views

  • Subjective-Learning Subjugated-Objectives Subversive-Subjunctives
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      I am feeling a bit like this is some lost text from a Dr. Seuss book for college students.
    • Terry Elliott
       
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Nice
  • Subjective
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      I am glad Susan brought this definition up. I was going to search it out. The "subjective reality" hits a nerve with me. I am thinking of not just my own bias but what I bring to the table and intend to take away from the table. I am an active participant.
  • subvert or overthrow, destroy, or undermine
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Pretty strong language here .. I am thinking how the remix culture might be considered subversive in this context, using a different (subjective) view to understand a learning environment.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • These include statements about one's state of mind, such as opinion, belief, purpose, intention, or desire.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Thank you for this. Here is the crux of how I think about subjective thinking ... tossed into the subjunctive salad bowl. Or have I been mistaken in my own beliefs about what subjective is?
  • how our "design" is experienced by any one learner is as unique as a fingerprint, and impeded upon by the scars we have collected throughout our coarses and courses and curses.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      For good and for bad .... it could be that we are shaped by the positive energy and the positive experiences. I am thinking of being part of networks liked CLMOOC and DS106 and Connected Courses ... those shape my expectations of what a course should look like these days.
  • entryway into possibility.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      Great phrase embedded in a deep paragraph .... We should get this tattooed on our web/head.
  • ridden like a wild bronco while you laugh maniacally.
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      I am tempted to make a comic with this line .... Yeehaw!
  • Click here for your summative assessment. 
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      OMG. I had a ball with this. I think I failed. I think I passed. I think I succeeded. I think I thought .... "Thank God, I have people like Susan to lead me astray."
    • Kevin Hodgson
       
      This line between subjective and objective is both intriguing and confusing (for me, anyway). This post by Susan really helped clarify some of the ideas. My annotations are my way of interacting with her text.
  • Revised Bloom's Taxonomy
  •  
    Kevin, I've been doing the subjective learning thing on my own for a very, very long time. Not coming to Vance Steven's multiliteracies, connectivist moocs or any open online courses as a "practicing" academic or educator (except in free range, heutagogical sense), I start with making my own subjectivity alignment -- if only to feel at least somewhat less the total outlier.

    Besides, isn't all learning is idiosyncratic and subjective?
Kevin Hodgson

Rhizomatic follower of rhizomes | NomadWarMachine - 2 views

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    Sarah breaks out the strings and makes a song remix about Dave ... nifty.
H DeWaard

Annotating to Understand - 3 views

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    Kevin Hodgson uses Diigo annotate to make sense of Susan Watson's post
Terry Elliott

touches of sense...: Doodling in Latin... - 1 views

  • I just couldn't be bothered.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      I was bothered. I never rose above it.  I stepped outside of it as soon as I finally understood my abuser.
  • I am the one at the back that the teacher gives stern looks to.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      I was a good boy.  I liked school.  I memorized my catechism.  I pleased my parents and my teachers.
  • I am the archetypal distracted student.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      I paid attention.
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • This class has got nothing to do with me.
    • Terry Elliott
       
      I know better.  You are obsessed with the rhizomatic meme.  I am, too. Not that I get it.
  • left me feeling a little frustrated
    • Terry Elliott
       
      left me feeling...a bit manipulated again by that teacher who does that fucking Socratic thing.
  • subjectives
    • Terry Elliott
       
      gotta love a word like 'subject' that is itself a placeholder nothing turned into an even vaguer noun and whose first meaning it to be submissive, subjugated, quite literally sub-jected.
  • lump of concrete just under the surface
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Many rhizomes are serious disrespecters of the concrete, irony that.  Bamboo--irreconcileable with any other plant.  Johnson grass--unless eaten back by my sheep, will run rampant.  And that doesn't even get at kudzu.  Rhizomes are in the dark and partake of the dark.  Don't ever forget.
  • I chose three posts which marked me from the first days of rhizo15:
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Of note: I wrote a post today before I read this that explored 3 ways of looking at 1 walk:  http://rhetcompnow.com/tools/one-walk-three-ways/
    • Terry Elliott
       
      Not sure I want to be told what not to be (raptor, troll) and what to be (swarm).  Isn't ethical action an exercise of will and choice?  Perhaps I need to learn to be in the swarm or maybe the swarm can be just as unethical?
  • uses language
    • Terry Elliott
       
      "unique as a fingerprint, and impeded upon by the scars we have collected throughout our coarses and courses and curses"--I love this because of the word 'impeded' literally to shackle the feet. In this case I see experience as shackle.  Too true and poetic as all 'get-out'.
  • exudes energy in her writing
    • Terry Elliott
       
      "Those who can meander freely through such a course as #rhizo15, whether it be maze-like or cloud-like or layers-deep or miles-wide, should consider this choice, this freedom, this perquisite of economy and culture and opportunity as an entryway into possibility."  This is the work of more than just facility, this is flexing and breathing and working repetition to serve a larger purpose--that of pointing to the nature of contingency in the world of free agent.  We open the doors of adjacency one after the other and here she points to our agency as a working through and through mazes and more mazes. Sweet metaphor.
  • one of the games that I prefer.
    • Terry Elliott
  • Dejected
    • Terry Elliott
       
      dejected, ppl. a.




      (dɪˈdʒɛktɪd) 




      [f. deject v.] 




      1.1 lit. Thrown or cast down, overthrown. arch. 




         1682 Wheler Journ. Greece vi. 427 Buried in the Rubbish of its dejected Roof and Walls.    1881 H. James Portr. Lady xxvi, Looking at her dejected pillar.




      b.1.b Allowed to hang down. 




         1809 Heber Passage of Red Sea 12 The mute swain‥With arms enfolded, and dejected head.




      c.1.c Of the eyes: Downcast. 




         1600 [see 3 b].    1663 Cowley Pindar. Odes, Brutus ii, If with dejected Eye In standing Pools we seek the Sky.    1715-20 Pope Iliad ix. 626 With humble mien and with dejected eyes Constant they follow where Injustice flies.




      d.1.d Her. Cast down, bent downwards; as dejected embowed, embowed with the head downwards. 




         1889 Elvin Dict. Her., Dejected, cast down, as a garb dejected or dejectant.




      †2.2 Lowered in estate, condition, or character; abased, humbled, lowly. Obs. 




         1605 Shakes. Lear iv. i. 3 The lowest and most deiected thing of Fortune.    1641 Milton Reform. ii. (1851) 71 The basest, the lowermost, the most dejected‥downe-trodden Vassals of Perdition.    a 1680 Butler Rem. (1759) II. 14 Able to reach from the highest Arrogance to the meanest, and most dejected Submissions.    1721 [see dejectedness].




      3.3 Depressed in spirits, downcast, disheartened, low-spirited. 




         1581 Marbeck Bk. of Notes 115 So that he was deiected and compelled to weepe for very many, which had fallen.    1608-11 Bp. Hall Medit. & Vows i. §39, I marvell not that a wicked man is‥so dejected, when hee feeles sicknes.    1667 Pepys Diary (1879) IV. 369 Never were people so dejected as they are in the City.    1793 Cowper Lett. 8 Sept., I am cheerful on paper sometimes, when I am absolutely the most dejected of all creatures.    1835 Lytton Rienzi x. viii, Thus are we fools of Fortune;-to-day glad-to-morrow dejected!




      b.3.b transf. (Of the visage, behaviour, etc.
  • Adjacent
    • Terry Elliott
       
      adjacent, a. and n.




      (əˈdʒeɪsənt) 




      [ad. L. adjacent-em pr. pple. of adjacē-re to lie near; f. ad to + jacē-re to lie. Cf. Fr. adjacent, 16th c. in Littré.] 




      A.A adj. 




      1.A.1 Lying near or close (to); adjoining; contiguous, bordering. (Not necessarily touching, though this is by no means precluded.) adjacent angles, the angles which one straight line makes with another upon which it stands. Also fig. in Logic of nearness in resemblance. 




         c 1430 Lydg. Bochas v. xiii. (1554) 132 a, There wer two cuntries therto adiacent.    1509 Barclay Ship of Fooles (1570) 104 [He] warred on other realmes adiacent.    1606 Shakes. Ant. & Cl. ii. ii. 218 A strange inuisible perfume hits the sense Of the adiacent Wharfes.    1663 Gerbier Counsel 6 The Houses adjacent, and those which are opposite.    1745 De Foe Eng. Tradesm. XI. xxxiv. 72 Those parts of Essex, Surrey, and Kent, which lie adjacent to London.    1789-96 J. Morse Amer. Geog. I. 302 The adjacent inhabitants had assembled in arms.    1827 Hutton Course of Math. I. 317 The sum of the two adjacent angles dac and dab is equal to two right angles.    1846 Mill Logic iii. xxi. §4 (1868) II. 108 With a reasonable degree of extension to adjacent cases.    1860 Tyndall Glaciers i. §2. 20 Furnishing ourselves with provisions at the adjacent inn.




      †B.B n. That which is adjacent, or lies next to anything; an adjoining part; a neighbour. Obs. 




         1610 Healey St. Aug., City of God 721 The LXX rather expressed the adjacents, then the place it selfe.    1635 Shelford Disc. 220 (T.) He hath no adjacent, no equal, no corrival.    1725 De Foe Voy. round World (1840) 224 The whole place and its adjacents.
  • Conject
    • Terry Elliott
       
      I would go on but nobody is going to read these OED references.
  • Rhizomatic learning in rhizo15 is about making connections.
H DeWaard

A #Rhizo15 Song Takes Root (And We Find Our Way Through) - 0 views

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    SONG - We Find Our Way Through
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