Skip to main content

Home/ LearningwithComputers/ Group items matching "information" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Benjamin Jörissen

rre : Message: [RRE]The Social Life of Information - 0 views

  • The importance of people as creators and carriers of knowledge is forcing organizations to realize that knowledge lies less in its databases than in its people.
  • Learning to be requires more than just information. It requires the ability to engage in the practice in question. Indeed, Bruner's distinction highlights another, made by the philosopher Gilbert Ryle. He distinguishes "know that" from "know how".
  • This claim of Polanyi's resembles Ryle's argument that "know that" doesn't produce "know how," and Bruner's that learning about doesn't, on its own, allow you to learn to be. Information, all these arguments suggest, is on its own not enough to produce actionable knowledge. Practice too is required.
  • ...20 more annotations...
  • Despite the tendency to shut ourselves away and sit in Rodinesque isolation when we have to learn, learning is a remarkably social process. Social groups provide the resources for their members to learn.
  • Learning and Identity Shape One Another
  • Bruner, with his idea of learning to be, and Lave and Wenger, in their discussion of communities of practice, both stress how learning needs to be understood in relation to the development of human identity.
  • In learning to be, in becoming a member of a community of practice, an individual is developing a social identity.
  • So, even when people are learning about, in Bruner's terms, the identity they are developing determines what they pay attention to and what they learn. What people learn about, then, is always refracted through who they are and what they are learning to be.
  • In either case, the result, as the anthropologist Gregory Bateson puts it neatly, is "a difference that makes a difference". 29 The importance of disturbance or change makes it almost inevitable that we focus on these.
  • So to understand the whole interaction, it is as important to ask how the lake is formed as to ask how the pebble got there. It's this formation rather than information that we want to draw attention to, though the development is almost imperceptible and the forces invisible in comparison to the drama and immediacy of the pebble. It's not, to repeat once more, the information that creates that background. The background has to be in place for the information to register.
  • The forces that shape the background are, rather, the tectonic social forces, always at work, within which and against which individuals configure their identity. These create not only grounds for reception, but grounds for interpretation, judgment, and understanding.
    • Benjamin Jörissen
       
      kulturelle Muster, die qua Sozialisation erworben werden, und die in Bildungsprozessen verändert werden.
  • A Brief Note on the "Social"
  • It took Karl Marx to point out, however, that Crusoe is not a universal. On his island (and in Defoe's mind), he is deeply rooted in the society from which he came
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • We need not watch long before we can explain it: he is playing at being a waiter in a cafe . . . . [T]he waiter plays with his condition in order to realize it
  • So while people do indeed learn alone, even when they are not stranded on desert islands or in small cafes, they are nonetheless always enmeshed in society, which saturates our environment, however much we might wish to escape it at times.
  • For the same reason, however, members of these networks are to some degree divided or separated from people with different practices. It is not the different information they have that divides them.
  • Rather, it is their different attitudes or dispositions toward that information -- attitudes and dispositions shaped by practice and identity -- that divide. Consequently, despite much in common, physicians are different from nurses, accountants from financial planners.
  • two types of work-related networks
  • First, there are the networks that link people to others whom they may never get to know but who work on similar practices. We call these "networks of practice"
  • Second, there are the more tight-knit groups formed, again through practice, by people working together on the same or similar tasks. These are what, following Lave and Wenger, we call "communities of practice".
  • Networks of Practice
  • The 25,000 reps working for Xerox make up, in theory, such a network.
robert smith

CNA Training Programs - 0 views

  •  
    CNA Certification Training Classes provides useful information about CNA Training. It Also Gives Idea about CNA Salary, and Job information
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    CNA Certification Training Classes provides useful information about CNA Training. It Also Gives Idea about CNA Salary, and Job information
  •  
    CNA Certification Training Classes provides useful information about CNA Training. It Also Gives Idea about CNA Salary, and Job information
  •  
    CNA Certification Training Classes provides useful information about CNA Training. It Also Gives Idea about CNA Salary, and Job information
Paul Beaufait

5 Instructional Shifts to Promote Deep Learning - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - DigLN, edleaders, EdTech - 14 views

  • The seamless integration of technology into the Common Core-aligned curriculum supports learning through active participation and increases opportunities for all students to have access to the tools and information they need for success.
  •  
    Oxnevad suggests, "Students can develop transferrable knowledge and skills as they engage in learning experiences that require them to construct knowledge" (¶1). She argues for "seamless integration of technology" that will enable "students students to have access to the tools and information they need for success" (¶2), and proposes five instructional strategies for teachers to use to achieve those ends, namely: 1. Preparing "complex questions that require students to use higher level thinking skills" (Help students uncover knowledge, ¶2); 2. Facilitating learning from engaging and online resources, rather than delivering content (Eliminate the front of the classroom); 3. Creating opportunities for real world collaboration (Encourage collaboration); 4. Exploiting classroom and online opportunities for "frequent [and] informal assessment to gauge the effectiveness of your instruction and make adjustments to maximize the learning experience for each student" (Informally assess students [and instructional practices]); and 5. Preparing and publishing screencast tutorials for students to peruse whenever necessary, "...[i]Instead of spending valuable instructional time teaching the same tech skills over and over again to individual students" (Provide students with built in tech support). This October 30, 2012, post ends with an illustration comprising focus questions and a ThingLink product of fifth grade students' work. A list of links to related posts follows.
David Wetzel

Top 10 Tips for Pursuing Lifelong Learning with an Informal Lens - 8 views

  •  
    The top 10 tips for pursuing lifelong learning focus on ways you can continue education through informal learning experiences, as opposed to attending formal class settings. Why this approach? Enrolling in formal continuing education courses and classes is difficult at times, considering life's tugs and pulls by everyday commitments. These obligations are why informal learning methods offer a viable option for continuing your education.
Zaid Mark

Registry Recycler - Free Registry Cleaner - 0 views

  •  
    The persistent use of applications on Windows ends up with specific information accumulated at a point of storage called Windows Registry. Registry retains and arranges such information in order to align the operations. Beside, being vital for proficient operations, this pack of information can cause hurdles in smooth functioning of OS.
IN PI

Nine Notable Uses for Social Bookmarking - 0 views

    • IN PI
       
      "Therefore, if you can attach an URL to a document, then you could use social bookmarking to organize any kind of document. This change of thinking can provide almost limitless opportunities for information management."
    • IN PI
       
      Nine uses - A use Information for yourself 1. Create a calendar of upcoming events 2. use bookmarks as a people data base 3. Maintain an on-line folder of research materials and reference sites 4. Create a file indexing system - images, video, audio - for items that are on line: organize them and also graphics and written documents: any kind of file on the Web can be classified and stored. 5. Determine the popularity or a website or a link: if certain bookmarks are being saved by many users, it may be an indication that the material is worth while. B - Share Information with other people 6. Create a public on-line portfolio: you can use bookmarks to create a tagged index of your on-line creative work. These groupings of your content may be shared with others in social bookmarking sites. 7. use bookmarks to make new contacts: discover the profile IDs or those who created the bookmarks: you may contact a person that bookmarks a lot of sites that you are looking for too. 8. Become an expert in giving opinions about specific websites. 9. Bookmarks may organize documents by multiple criteria within a single application; but you may use several different bookmarking applications: 9.1. Delicious - large number of users - great sharing. 9.2. Magnoia - with social features making it easier to share ideas. 9.3. Netvouz - powerful search and tagging
  •  
    first Web2.0 Wednesday Using social bookmarking to share and organize information; to manage an on-line portfolio
andrew bendelow

Millennials: Social Media and the Idea Web | Social Media Today - 1 views

  • It's about ethics. If I have information, it is my job to give it to someone who needs it, and I expect the same from my friends. This is the Idea web – it's a web of information and we are all tied together.”
  •  
    a new social media ethic emerging with the millenial generation--my obligation is to share my information--niceties be damned
susana canelo

Week 1 - Any Questions or Comments about Social Bookmarking? | Diigo - 0 views

    • Joao Alves
       
      The idea of bundling tags in weeks is a very good and simple one. Students feel there is a guidance and that they don't need to waste time searching for relevant information. It's like in webquest where you give certain sites to students to explore about a specific topic.
  • Besides, I created a tutorial with the most important features in Delicious.
  • Another aspect is that I think that online bookmarking should make us guilty-free instead of guilty because we don't check all the links we've bookmarked.
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • Who said we need to look at them all?
  • As for information overload, I consider bookmarking a way to dribble information overload. Why? If you have tons of bookmarks together with tons of people's bookmarks being tagged, you can use those bookmarks to create meaning whenever needed.
  • If you consider Diigo for that matter, you could easily set up a group and you could have the bookmarks for your students to start with and encourage them to share their bookmarks with the group. Also, I'd consider specific tags
  • I think the comments feature and the sticky notes have great potential in the classroom!
  • Working with bookmarks to make a digital portfolio sounds very creative.
  • I thought the idea of a digital portfolio using tags a very interesting one, even more with the webslides. You can keep track of all the online artifacts you've been creating. Interesting for busy educators!
  • I think a really big thing is to change one's way of thinking.
  • First, add tags that are meaningful for you, for your private retrieval, and also tags that have been suggested by the group that will help others browse through the treasures you find online.
  • Handling more information and sharing it with our colleagues should make us better teachers.
  • Every online resource we explore is bookmarked and shared with the group. I used to do that in delicious. Now, I'll have to see how to do that here. In delicious I could easily organize my tags in Weeks (bundling tags). Here, I think you can use the "lists" to organize your tags in a meaningful way to the group. I'll check that.
    • Joao Alves
       
      This would be interesting to explore further.
  •  
    You are such a competent teacher using technologies, Carla. Congratulations!
IN PI

Coding In Paradise: Creating a Personal Research Agenda - 0 views

  • If you do not work on an important problem, it's unlikely you'll do important work.
  • It's not the consequence that makes a problem important, it is that you have a reasonable attack
  •  
    1.About having a research agenda: 1.1."It is a list of questions to focus on, the organizing principle around which you work" 1.2.Benefits from having a personal research agenda: Keeps the track of meaning like following a thread while your thought mules over those questions. 2. Sharing of personal research questions: They turn around the future web - The Editable Web: finding "a web browser that deeply embeds collaboration and editing." 3. The fabulous "Web-utopia": "people, collaboration and usability are first class citizens; ... seamless community as a major component of the browser...unifying editing and community (Tim Berner)...collaborative hypertext... 4."How can we create communication technologies that provide ever greater levels of interpersonal connection...? 5. "How can we create information technologies of focus and minimal distraction...?" ("The law of conservation of attention") 6. On search systems 7. On transforming how we link and talk about information and docs 8. Lightening the handling of events 9. On effectiveness at creating ideas 10. On creating technologies as important as writing
David Wetzel

Google Search Tips and Tricks for Science and Math Classes - 11 views

  •  
    Google is not just useful for conducting searches for information on the Internet. In fact, it can be used and manipulated with cool and tricks in ways which help you and your students search for information about science and math with more effectiveness. Along with all subject areas students are engaged in school. The tips and tricks designed to help you and your science or math students take advantage of Google's search engine.
mikee4444

HP printer Technical Support, 18007909186 Help, and Troubleshooting | HP printer Customer - YouTube - 0 views

  •  
    hp printer driver installation and Support @ 1800-790-9186 hp printer support phone number Find support options including software, drivers, manuals, how to install drivers and troubleshooting information for your HP Printers.We offer Hp support for the suite of Hp products.Hp printer drivers to Hp laptop support and Hp printer Support we've got you covered. How can we help you today? hp Printer and hp Laptop Support information on installing your printer and the printer driver that matches your operating system. Download drivers, software, firmware and manuals and get access to online technical support resources and troubleshooting. Please call us @ 18007909186 for your Hp printer driver or all-in-one below in order to access the latest downloads including software, manuals, drivers or firmware.
David Wetzel

Top 10 Online Tools for Teaching Science and Math - 18 views

  •  
    Why use Web 2.0 tools in science and math classes? The primary reason is they facilitate access to input and interaction with content through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. These tools offer enormous advantages for science and math teachers, in terms of helping their students learn using Web 2.0 tools. For example: * Most of these tools can be edited from any computer connected to the Internet. Teachers can add, edit and delete information even during class time. * Students learn how to use these tools for academic purposes and, at the same time, can transfer their use to their personal lives and future professional careers. * RSS feeds allow students to access all the desired research information on one page. * Students learn to be autonomous in their learning process.
Paul Beaufait

How can I tell if a website is credible? - 11 views

  •  
    This webpage suggests six factors to consider when assessing website credibility, and adds, "If you are unsure whether the site you're using is credible, verify the information you find there with another source you know to be reliable" (retrieved 2016.12.22).
Lords Baronets

Online Teaching and Education Degrees | Master Education Degree | Online Teaching Degrees - 0 views

  •  
    Are you looking for the information on online degree post? If yes, look no further. Here, you will get exact information that you want on online degree programs. So what are you looking for? Browse our website and get the information on online college degree and university online degree as well.
Walter Antoniotti

Free Business Software - 0 views

  •  
    free software to help with accounting, statistics, communication, information management, mathematics, spreadsheets, suits,
Carla Arena

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them.)
  • They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.
  • “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read
  • Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace
  • Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
    • Carla Arena
       
      So, how can we still use "power browsing" and teach our students to interpret, analyze, think.
  • The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. People used to think that our mental meshwork, the dense connections formed among the 100 billion or so neurons inside our skulls, was largely fixed by the time we reached adulthood. But brain researchers have discovered that that’s not the case
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's what a student of mine, who is a neurologist, calls neuroplasticity.
  • Still, their easy assumption that we’d all “be better off” if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling. It suggests a belief that intelligence is the output of a mechanical process, a series of discrete steps that can be isolated, measured, and optimized. In Google’s world, the world we enter when we go online, there’s little place for the fuzziness of contemplation. Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. The human brain is just an outdated computer that needs a faster processor and a bigger hard drive.
    • Carla Arena
       
      Scary...
  • It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.
    • Carla Arena
       
      more hyperlinking, more possibilites for ads, more commercial value to others...
  • The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained, undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
  • If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content,” we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
  • I come from a tradition of Western culture, in which the ideal (my ideal) was the complex, dense and “cathedral-like” structure of the highly educated and articulate personality—a man or woman who carried inside themselves a personally constructed and unique version of the entire heritage of the West. [But now] I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self—evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the “instantly available.”
  • As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”
  •  
    I bought the Atlantic just because of this article and just loved it. It has an interesting analysis of what is happening to our reading, questions what might be happening to our brains, and it inquires on the future of our relationship with technology. Are we just going to become "pancake people"? Would love to hear what you think.
Joao Alves

Mentoring and 21st Century Skills » Evolve - 0 views

  • key for lifelong learning and ongoing further development, not only to learn about ICT skills, but actually to learn with and from others in an continuum process of peer mentoring and support.
    • Joao Alves
       
      I can only agree with this.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Absolutely!
  • Another key thought of this session was the idea that the skills 21st Century learners need doesn’t rely so much on acquiring information, but actually making sense of that information. Anne states that “knowing a fact is no longer impressive; rather important is how we add some critical thinking to it.” In this sense how we manage the abundance of information available these days on the we web is crucial. And that implies new skills, like networking and collaborative work.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Absolutely!
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Learning Technologies should not play a predominant role in the 21st Century learning and mentoring approach as not to overshadow the pedagogical strategy. Technologies should therefore be used to support new learning opportunities and enable different learning contexts. Still the emphasis has to be on the individual and on learning.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Agree. Many of us, including me, often tend to put the emphasis on technology instead on the the individual and on learning.
Carla Arena

Folksonomies - Cooperative Classification and Communication Through Shared Metadata - 0 views

  • A user on Flickr, Andrew Lowosky, began posting pictures of doorbells in Florence, along with a brief piece of fiction about the doorbell in the description of the photograph. He dubbed this combination of photograph and short story “flicktion,” and tagged it as such. (Lowosky, 2004.) Some other users have been tagging photographs with “flicktion” and writing short fiction to accompany it
    • Carla Arena
       
      Interesting use of tags.
  • the most used tags are more likely to be used by other users since they are more likely to be seen
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's our idea, isn't it? Providing more tags that will be useful for individual use and for the group.
  • A folksonomy represents simultaneously some of the best and worst in the organization of information. Its uncontrolled nature is fundamentally chaotic, suffers from problems of imprecision and ambiguity that well developed controlled vocabularies and name authorities effectively ameliorate. Conversely, systems employing free-‍form tagging that are encouraging users to organize information in their own ways are supremely responsive to user needs and vocabularies, and involve the users of information actively in the organizational system. Overall, transforming the creation of explicit metadata for resources from an isolated, professional activity into a shared, communicative activity by users is an important development that should be explored and considered for future systems development.
    • Carla Arena
       
      imprecision and ambiguity x free-form tagging - user-generated communicative activity. We should see how our community semantic building evolves.
  •  
    reference from Folksonomies: Tidying up Tags?
  •  
    Thanks, Paul, for bookmarking this site. Interesting reading that points out to what we've been experiencing, the strengths and weakenesses of folksonomies. If we learn about them, we can try to minimize a bit ambiguity problems in tagging, though they will always be there!
Paul Beaufait

Educational Leadership:Reading Comprehension:Making Sense of Online Text - 11 views

  • The following strategy lesson invites students to stop, think, and anticipate where important information about a Web site's content might be found
  • To move students beyond simply cutting and pasting their notes directly into their final projects, teachers can provide students with a word-processing document (see fig. 3) that serves as a template to help them organize their research
  •  
    Coiro, Julie. (2005). Making sense of online text. Educational Leadership 62(2), 30-35. Retrieved September 21, 2011, from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/oct05/vol63/num02/Making-Sense-of-Online-Text.aspx "Four challenges face students as they use Internet technologies to search for, navigate, critically evaluate, and synthesize information. Here ... [Coiro] pose[s] each challenge as a question and suggest a corresponding activity that models effective strategies to help students meet that challenge" (A New Kind of Literacy, ¶3).
robert smith

CNA Training Classes - 1 views

  •  
    CNA Certification Classes is very helpful guide provides you best CNA Training Information Like CNA Salary and Jobs Details
  •  
    CNA Certification Classes is very helpful guide provides you best CNA Training Information Like CNA Salary and Jobs Details
  •  
    CNA Certification Classes is very helpful guide provides you best CNA Training Information Like CNA Salary and Jobs Details
1 - 20 of 153 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page