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Vicki Davis

Parenting Style May Worsen Toddler Aggression | Psych Central News - 4 views

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    New longitudinal study. "University of Montreal researchers now believe parental behavior may play a factor in the link between verbal frustrations and aggression. Physical aggression in toddlers includes frequent hitting, kicking, and a tendency to bite or push others. "Since the 1940s, studies have observed an association between physical aggression problems and language problems among children and adolescents. It was also demonstrated around ten years ago that physical aggression problems arise in early childhood when language develops."
Vicki Davis

Parent's Day - 3 views

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    Great resources for Parent's day. Review these and plan ahead.
Vicki Davis

Parent's Day Activities - 0 views

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    Parents Day is July 28th. Here are 15 ways to incorporate parents into your classroom with some great ideas. You start off the school year trying to establish a positive, encouraging relationship with parents. It is one of the most important things you do. You each have a role with children. Plan NOW how you are going to relate to and encourage parents in your classroom this year - here are some ideas.
Vicki Davis

Kids-In-Mind: Movie Ratings That Actually Work - 7 views

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    My Friend Anne Truger recommended this site as a place to go for movie reviews for kids. You have to be careful not to read too much of it or you'll hit spoilers. I like this - it hits the different areas: sex and nudity, violence and gore, and profanity. I've had a couple of movies that I've felt were over the top on profanity and trash talk lately and am going to be checking out websites like this one from now on. This is one to share with parents.
Dave Truss

Cyberbullying needs its own treatment strategies - 4 views

  • Traditional bullying, she says, is often associated with three main characteristics — a power differential between bully and victim, proactive targeting of a victim and ongoing aggression.Research is beginning to show that cyberbullying doesn’t necessarily involve those characteristics. In the case of a power differential between aggressor and victim — often based in the schoolyard on size and popularity — those qualities don’t apply
  • Another unique element of cyberbullying is that adolescents online often find themselves playing all the roles in what could be described as a traditional schoolyard bullying drama.
  • “We are looking at the impact of the child-parent relationship. If parents have an open relationship with their children and are able to discuss their online activities with them we find incidents of cyber-aggression are reduced and children are less likely to engage in cyberbullying or be the recipient of it,”
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    "We are looking at the impact of the child-parent relationship. If parents have an open relationship with their children and are able to discuss their online activities with them we find incidents of cyber-aggression are reduced and children are less likely to engage in cyberbullying or be the recipient of it,"
Vicki Davis

Create a personal video for your family this Christmas - 1 views

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    (Hat tip to Larry Ferlazzo for this gem) - put your pictures and house into the video and have a customized video created where Santa visits your house. Talk about a great way to excite the kids! So cool.
Vicki Davis

100 Activities for Parents and Kids to do over the break - 0 views

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    Although this was designed for summer, the list has a lot of ideas that parents can do with children over the break. While I do leave time for my kids to have a break, I do try to find things that will encourage their love of learning that I sneak in there kind of like sneaking vegetables into things without them knowing. Have a great break! Teachers might want to download and share with parents headed on break.
Marilyn Mossman

Welcome to the Age of Overparenting - Boston Magazine - bostonmagazine.com - 7 views

  • asks us to think back to the childhood moment when we were the happiest. “Okay, now raise your hand if there was an adult with you in that moment,” he says.
  • You don’t gain self-esteem first, then achieve great things. You work hard, fail, pick yourself up, try again, accomplish something new, and then feel pretty good about yourself.
Vicki Davis

Success Starts at Home - Part 2 « The Balancing Act - Show Blog - 1 views

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    The second part in the series for lifetime. It will be on my blog next week but if you read part one yesterday, here is part two!
Dave Truss

Parenting in the Digital Age by David Truss - Our School.ca - 11 views

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    Kim Caise pointed me to Raising Digital Kids wikispace created by David Truss. This is a really solid resource for both parents and teachers to us to work together around parenting and parenting in a digital age. You will want to review Parents as Partners: Questions and Advice
Vicki Davis

Parental Involvement and Student Achievement: A Meta-Analysis / Browse Our Publications... - 10 views

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    Parent involvement is highly correlated with student success. Here is an overview of some meta analysis done through Harvard's school of education.
Ed Webb

How to Land Your Kid in Therapy - Magazine - The Atlantic - 11 views

  • Meanwhile, rates of anxiety and depression have also risen in tandem with self-esteem. Why is this? “Narcissists are happy when they’re younger, because they’re the center of the universe,” Twenge explains. “Their parents act like their servants, shuttling them to any activity they choose and catering to their every desire. Parents are constantly telling their children how special and talented they are. This gives them an inflated view of their specialness compared to other human beings. Instead of feeling good about themselves, they feel better than everyone else.” In early adulthood, this becomes a big problem. “People who feel like they’re unusually special end up alienating those around them,” Twenge says. “They don’t know how to work on teams as well or deal with limits. They get into the workplace and expect to be stimulated all the time, because their worlds were so structured with activities. They don’t like being told by a boss that their work might need improvement, and they feel insecure if they don’t get a constant stream of praise. They grew up in a culture where everyone gets a trophy just for participating, which is ludicrous and makes no sense when you apply it to actual sports games or work performance. Who would watch an NBA game with no winners or losers? Should everyone get paid the same amount, or get promoted, when some people have superior performance? They grew up in a bubble, so they get out into the real world and they start to feel lost and helpless. Kids who always have problems solved for them believe that they don’t know how to solve problems. And they’re right—they don’t.”
  • I asked Wendy Mogel if this gentler approach really creates kids who are less self-involved, less “Me Generation.” No, she said. Just the opposite: parents who protect their kids from accurate feedback teach them that they deserve special treatment. “A principal at an elementary school told me that a parent asked a teacher not to use red pens for corrections,” she said, “because the parent felt it was upsetting to kids when they see so much red on the page. This is the kind of self-absorption we’re seeing, in the name of our children’s self-esteem.”
  • research shows that much better predictors of life fulfillment and success are perseverance, resiliency, and reality-testing
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  • “They believe that ‘average’ is bad for self-esteem.”
  • Jane told me that because parents are so sensitive to how every interaction is processed, sometimes she feels like she’s walking on eggshells while trying to do her job. If, for instance, a couple of kids are doing something they’re not supposed to—name-calling, climbing on a table, throwing sand—her instinct would be to say “Hey, knock it off, you two!” But, she says, she’d be fired for saying that, because you have to go talk with the kids, find out what they were feeling, explain what else they could do with that feeling other than call somebody a “poopy face” or put sand in somebody’s hair, and then help them mutually come up with a solution. “We try to be so correct in our language and our discipline that we forget the true message we’re trying to send—which is, don’t name-call and don’t throw the sand!” she said. “But by the time we’re done ‘talking it through,’ the kids don’t want to play anymore, a rote apology is made, and they’ll do it again five minutes later, because they kind of got a pass. ‘Knock it off’ works every time, because they already know why it’s wrong, and the message is concise and clear. But to keep my job, I have to go and explore their feelings.”
  • “The ideology of our time is that choice is good and more choice is better,” he said. “But we’ve found that’s not true.”
  • Kids feel safer and less anxious with fewer choices, Schwartz says; fewer options help them to commit to some things and let go of others, a skill they’ll need later in life.
  • Most parents tell kids, ‘You can do anything you want, you can quit any time, you can try this other thing if you’re not 100 percent satisfied with the other.’ It’s no wonder they live their lives that way as adults, too.” He sees this in students who graduate from Swarthmore. “They can’t bear the thought that saying yes to one interest or opportunity means saying no to everything else, so they spend years hoping that the perfect answer will emerge. What they don’t understand is that they’re looking for the perfect answer when they should be looking for the good-enough answer.”
  • what parents are creating with all this choice are anxious and entitled kids whom she describes as “handicapped royalty.”
  • When I was my son’s age, I didn’t routinely get to choose my menu, or where to go on weekends—and the friends I asked say they didn’t, either. There was some negotiation, but not a lot, and we were content with that. We didn’t expect so much choice, so it didn’t bother us not to have it until we were older, when we were ready to handle the responsibility it requires. But today, Twenge says, “we treat our kids like adults when they’re children, and we infantilize them when they’re 18 years old.”
  • too much choice makes people more likely to feel depressed and out of control
Vicki Davis

DimensionU - Educational Video Game Technology for the 21st Century Student - 15 views

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    For parents who want fun things for their students to do over the summer that will help students learn more and move forward in math and literacy skills - this is a website to check out. "Students enter the tournament by going to www.DimensionU.com/SummerChallenge. Once registered (parental permission is required) they will compete in math- and literacy-based games for a chance to win gift cards and summer-related prizes like inline skates, inflatable pools, beach volleyball sets, or tents. Five lucky players will be randomly selected to win an iPod Nano each. New this year is a social networking component that encourages students to build online "learning communities" of friends, family, community members, or even teachers - basically anyone who wants to help support the child's academic efforts during the summer. Participants who earn the highest number of social network points in each tournament round will win prizes separate from those awarded for game play performance."
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    Suggest this to parents.
Dave Truss

Cyberbullying: the research reveals school itself is (a lot) more problematic than the ... - 19 views

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    When we perceive of risk in sharing publicly and interacting online we nearly always risk obscuring huge benefits with our own inflated fear of the unknown. Research shows that digital risks are far outweighed, in fact, by challenges more close to home and school.
Dave Truss

Welcome to the Reach Out Pro blog - Blame the technology - 6 views

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    The purpose of this article is to establish a reasonable level of understanding that there are underlying mental health factors that could possibly cause young people to become either perpetrators or victims of cyber bullying and unwanted sexual solicitation. This is a more constructive view for the purpose of prevention, compared to one that seeks only, to blame technology.
Yoon Soo Lim

Raising 'Digital' Kids - Parent Workshop by David Truss - home - 11 views

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    Parent workshop
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