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globalwrobel

Digital Natives: Do They Really THINK Differently? - 41 views

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    by Marc Prensky Our children today are being socialized in a way that is vastly different from their parents. The
    numbers are overwhelming: over 10,000 hours playing videogames, over 200,000 emails and
    instant messages sent and received; over 10,000 hours talking on digital cell phones; over 20,000
    hours watching TV (a high percentage fast speed MTV), over 500,000 commercials seen-all
    before the kids leave college. And, maybe, at the very most, 5,000 hours of book reading. These
    are today's ―Digital Native‖ students.
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    In Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants: Part I, I discussed how the differences between our Digital
    Native students and their Digital Immigrant teachers lie at the root of a great many of today's
    educational problems. I suggested that Digital Natives' brains are likely physically different as a
    result of the digital input they received growing up. And I submitted that learning via digital
    games is one good way to reach Digital Natives in their ―native language.‖
    Here I present evidence for why I think this is so. It comes from neurobiology, social psychology, and from studies done on children using games for learning.
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    by Marc Prensky Our children today are being socialized in a way that is vastly different from their parents. The
    numbers are overwhelming: over 10,000 hours playing videogames, over 200,000 emails and
    instant messages sent and received; over 10,000 hours talking on digital cell phones; over 20,000
    hours watching TV (a high percentage fast speed MTV), over 500,000 commercials seen-all
    before the kids leave college. And, maybe, at the very most, 5,000 hours of book reading. These
    are today's ―Digital Native‖ students.
    1
    In Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants: Part I, I discussed how the differences between our Digital
    Native students and their Digital Immigrant teachers lie at the root of a great many of today's
    educational problems. I suggested that Digital Natives' brains are likely physically different as a
    result of the digital input they received growing up. And I submitted that learning via digital
    games is one good way to reach Digital Natives in their ―native language.‖
    Here I present evidence for why I think this is so. It comes from neurobiology, social psychology, and from studies done on children using games for learning.
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    Hi.

    I wrote a paper about digital natives as part of an anthropology assignment for a doctoral course. Researchers from around the world have empirically proven that Prensky's theories are false. Additionally, while neuroscience has shown that brains do change as a result of neuroplasticity, to argue that it is generational is also a false claim.

    Though cognitive theory shows that learners bring their prior experiences to the interpretation of new educational opportunities - impacting attention and interpretation - all generations have had this occur. There is merit to the point that we should take learner's prior experience into consideration when designing instruction; however, Prensky's digital native claims may have done more to create tension between students and teachers than to provide instructional support.

    If you would like any of the scholarly studies, I have a published reference list at http://brholland.com/reference-list.

    Beth
Donal O' Mahony

Exaggeration… | eLearning Island - 26 views

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    A short contribution to the debate on immigrant and native, skeptic and enthusiast....
Donal O' Mahony

An Immigration once again… | eLearning Island - 26 views

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    How many of us have that heart-sinking experience when a presenter talks at us older people as immigrants and the younger as natives, when in fact, we are all in this together.
Kelvin Thompson

Fallacy of Digital Natives - 103 views

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    A robust rebuttal of Prensky, Tapscott, et al's assertions that contemporary generations are more technologically proficient than their predecessors. The counter-argument is that our society has become more technological and individuals are more or less well adapted to this change. The author of this rebuttal (Pontefract) makes a case based upon logic, personal experience, and several recent research studies.
Marc Safran

Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants - 1 views

  • Our students have changed radically. Today’s students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.
  • today's students think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors
  • we can say with certainty that their thinking patterns have changed
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • The importance of the distinction is this: As Digital Immigrants learn - like all immigrants, some better than others - to adapt to their environment, they always retain, to some degree, their "accent," that is, their foot in the past.
  • There are hundreds of examples of the digital immigrant accent. 
  • our Digital Immigrant instructors, who speak an outdated language (that of the pre-digital age), are struggling to teach a population that speaks an entirely new language
  • Digital Immigrant teachers assume that learners are the same as they have always been, and that the same methods that worked for the teachers when they were students will work for their students now. But that assumption is no longer valid. Today's learners are different.
  • So what should happen?  Should the Digital Native students learn the old ways, or should their Digital Immigrant educators learn the new? 
  • methodology
  • learn to communicate in the language and style of their students
  • it does mean going faster, less step-by step, more in parallel, with more random access, among other thing
  • kinds of content
  • As educators, we need to be thinking about how to teach both Legacy and Future content in the language of the Digital Natives.
  • Adapting materials to the language of Digital Natives has already been done successfully.  My own preference for teaching Digital Natives is to invent computer games to do the job, even for the most serious content.
  • "Why not make the learning into a video game!
  • But while the game was easy for my Digital Native staff to invent, creating the content turned out to be more difficult for the professors, who were used to teaching courses that started with "Lesson 1 – the Interface."  We asked them instead to create a series of graded tasks into which the skills to be learned were embedded. The professors had made 5-10 minute movies to illustrate key concepts; we asked them to cut them to under 30 seconds. The professors insisted that the learners to do all the tasks in order; we asked them to allow random access. They wanted a slow academic pace, we wanted speed and urgency (we hired a Hollywood script writer to provide this.)   They wanted written instructions; we wanted computer movies. They wanted the traditional pedagogical language of "learning objectives," "mastery", etc. (e.g. "in this exercise you will learn"); our goal was to completely eliminate any language that even smacked of education.
  • large mind-shift required
  • We need to invent Digital Native methodologies for all subjects, at all levels, using our students to guide us.
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    Our students have changed radically. Today's students are no longer the people our educational system was designed to teach.
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