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Joshua Yeidel

Students Know Good Teaching When They Get It, Survey Finds - NYTimes.com - 2 views

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    ... as measured by student evals and "value-added modeling".  Note some of the student eval items, though... e.g., students agree or disagree with "In this class, we learn to correct our mistakes."
Joshua Yeidel

Evaluating Teachers: The Important Role of Value-Added [pdf] - 1 views

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    "We conclude that value-added data has an important role to play in teacher evaluation systems, but that there is much to be learned about how best to use value-added information in human resource decisions."

    No mention of the role of assessment in improvement.
Joshua Yeidel

Teaching for America - NYTimes.com - 1 views

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    Tom Friedman reports (approvingly) on Arne Duncan's plans to upgrade the teaching profession.  Any gueses how this might apply to "higher" education?
Theron DesRosier

The Future of Work: As Gartner Sees It - 3 views

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    "Gartner points out that the world of work will probably witness ten major changes in the next ten years. Interesting in that it will change how learning happens in the workplace as well. The eLearning industry will need to account for the coming change and have a strategy in place to deal with the changes."
Joshua Yeidel

Higher Education: Assessment & Process Improvement Group News | LinkedIn - 2 views

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    So here it is: by definition, the value-added component of the D.C. IMPACT evaluation system defines 50 percent of all teachers in grades four through eight as ineffective or minimally effective in influencing their students' learning. And given the imprecision of the value-added scores, just by chance some teachers will be categorized as ineffective or minimally effective two years in a row. The system is rigged to label teachers as ineffective or minimally effective as a precursor to firing them.
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    How assessment of value-added actually works in one setting: the Washington, D.C. public schools. This article actually works the numbers to show that the system is set up to put teachers in the firing zone. Note the tyranny of numerical ratings (some of them subjective) converted into meanings like "minimally effective".
Matthew Tedder

Accountable Talk: (Un)intended Consequences - 2 views

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    Nutty method of teacher evaluation
Corinna Lo

Why Did 17 Million Students Go to College? - Innovations - The Chronicle of Higher Educ... - 0 views

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    "Over 317,000 waiters and waitresses have college degrees (over 8,000 of them have doctoral or professional degrees), along with over 80,000 bartenders, and over 18,000 parking lot attendants. All told, some 17,000,000 Americans with college degrees are doing jobs that the BLS says require less than the skill levels associated with a bachelor's degree."
Joshua Yeidel

Mind - Research Upends Traditional Thinking on Study Habits - NYTimes.com - 2 views

  • “The contrast between the enormous popularity of the learning-styles approach within education and the lack of credible evidence for its utility is, in our opinion, striking and disturbing,” the researchers concluded.
  • “We have yet to identify the common threads between teachers who create a constructive learning atmosphere,” said Daniel T. Willingham, a psychologist at the University of Virginia and author of the book “Why Don’t Students Like School?”
  • psychologists have discovered that some of the most hallowed advice on study habits is flat wrong
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    "Evidence" that the "evidence" is not very effective to promote change.  Apparently the context is crucial to adoption.
Nils Peterson

Dave's Educational Blog - 0 views

  • If all of our students are remembering the same things, the things that they learned for their standards test, the collaborative work between those students will only differ insofar as they have lived different lives OUTSIDE of school. In this sense, the education system plays NO part whatsoever in contributing to the creative economy.
    • Nils Peterson
       
      Recalling Bransford and the amout of time in our lives we are learning vs the amount of time in school
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    portfolio implications: In the rhizomatic model of learning, curriculum is not driven by predefined inputs from experts; it is constructed and negotiated in real time by the contributions of those engaged in the learning process. This community acts as th
Joshua Yeidel

5 Non-Western Teaching Strategies - Commentary - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 1 views

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    Methods and attitudes from other cultures can enliven the classroom.
Nils Peterson

Response to critiques of Open Course Educause article and the free economy generally @ ... - 1 views

  • what is the difference between the MOOC model and the commodity model.
    • Nils Peterson
       
      And what is the difference between a Massively Open Online Course and a community exploring a shared problem? There is a time factor (perhaps) but communities may run hot and fast. There is a leadership role (perhaps) but a community could galvanize around a leader for its work. There is an institution and a tie to the historical other meanings of course.
  • Earlier this year, while George Siemens and I were working our way through teaching the Edfutures course, we were contacted by the fine folks at the Educause review and asked to contribute an article on ‘the open course.
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    Cormier shares a back channel to the Edcause Review article
Gary Brown

What's Wrong With the American University System - Culture - The Atlantic - 3 views

  • But when the young superstar sat down with the department chair, he seemed to have only one goal: to land a tenure-track position that involved as many sabbaticals and as little teaching as possible
  • Hacker and his coauthor, New York Times writer Claudia Dreifus, use this cautionary tale to launch their new book, a fierce critique of modern academia called Higher Education? "The question mark in our title," they write, "is the key to this book." To their minds, little of what takes place on college campuses today can be considered either "higher" or "education."
  • They blame a system that favors research over teaching and vocational training over liberal arts.
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • Tenure, they argue, does anything but protect intellectual freedom
  • Schools get status by bringing on professors who are star researchers, star scholars. That's all we really know about Caltech or MIT or Stanford. We don't really know about the quality of undergraduate teaching at any of these places. And it's the students who suffer.
  • Claudia and I were up at Harvard talking to students, and they said they get nothing from their classes, but that doesn't matter. They're smart already—they can breeze through college. The point is that they're going to be Harvard people when they come out.
  • So tenure is, in fact, the enemy of spontaneity, the enemy of intellectual freedom.
  • Good teaching can't be quantified at the college level.
  • or instance, Evergreen College, a sweet little state school in Olympia, Washington. We spent three days there and it was fantastic. They don't give grades, and they don't have academic departments. There are no faculty rankings. Almost all the classes we saw were taught by two professors—say, one from philosophy and one from psychology, teaching jointly on Henry and William James. Even though they don't give grades, the professors write out long evaluations for students. And the students have no problem getting into graduate schools.
  • I like Missouri Western State. It's a third-tier university, but the faculty realize they're going to stay there, they're not going to get hired away by other colleges, so they pitch in and take teaching seriously. At a school like that, you have a decent chance of finding a mentor who will write you a strong recommendation, better than you would at Harvard.
  • We believe the current criteria for admissions—particularly the SAT—are just so out of whack. It's like No Child Left Behind. It really is. It's one of the biggest crimes that's ever been perpetrated.
  • Professor X. He argued that some students just aren't ready for college. What's your view on that?

    Our view is that the primary obligation belongs to the teacher. Good teaching is not just imparting knowledge, like pouring milk into a jug. It's the job of the teacher to get students interested and turned on no matter what the subject is. Every student can be turned on if teachers really engage in this way. We saw it at Evergreen and other places that have this emphasis.
  • This is the hand I was dealt this semester. This is my job." Some people say to me, "Your students at Queens, are they any good?" I say, "I make them good." Every student is capable of college. I know some people have had difficult high school educations. But if you have good teachers who really care, it's remarkable how you can make up the difference.
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    In case you haven't already seen this.  While don't deny higher education needs attention, I personal wish there'd be far more attention paid to lower education and regressive education (my own term for, redressing and improving the education of all U.S. citizens).  We are in the process of destroying our country and our world.  Education as at the very heart of any solution.
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    More of the discussion in the news--the Atlantic
Gary Brown

Teacher-Education Programs Are Unaccountable and Undemanding, Report Says - Government ... - 2 views

  • Most states are doing little or nothing to hold teacher-education programs accountable for the quality of their graduates, according to a new report that also criticizes colleges for setting low standards for education majors.
  • Colleges, by contrast, are largely not selective enough in accepting students for education programs, lack a rigorous curriculum, and don't give teaching candidates enough classroom training.
  • the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, said that the report was timely and that her association was working to unify its members on the theme of accountability.
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    Apparently NCATE is not sufficient according to some.
Joshua Yeidel

The Creativity Crisis - Newsweek - 5 views

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    A "Creativity Gap" can be addressed through problem-based learning
Nils Peterson

Charles Leadbeater: Education innovation in the slums | Video on TED.com - 0 views

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    You remember Hole in the Wall project, this guy is also looking at learning in urban slums and the challenges to traditional institutions
Joshua Yeidel

A Classical Education: Back to the Future - Opinionator Blog - NYTimes.com - 1 views

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    Professor Stanley Fish reports approvingly on three books that emphasize "Classical" (as in Latin and Greek) education, memorization, drill, and so on. But what do we do when "worked for me" is not enough?
Joshua Yeidel

Op-Ed Columnist - History for Dollars - NYTimes.com - 1 views

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    Conservative columnist David Brooks makes a case for the importance of liberal arts and humanities, first in economic contexts, but later (more interestingly and importantly) in the context of human living.
Joshua Yeidel

Op-Ed Contributor - Why Charter Schools Fail the Test - NYTimes.com - 1 views

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    Charles Murray of the Amertican Enterprise Institute waves a conservative flag for _abandoning_ standardized tests in education-- from a consumer's (parent's) standpoint
Theron DesRosier

Critical Thinking as a Distributed Course - 2 views

  • Drawing from two years of experience offering the 'Connectivism and Connective Knowledge' course in a distributed online environment, the National Research Council's Personal Learning Environment (PLE) project is expanding the model to courses outside the discipline of education. Specifically, Stephen Downes and Rita Kop - who have both offered Critical Thinking courses through more traditional online and offline means, are adapting this material to the distributed model.

    The purpose of this course is two-fold. First, the design of the course is based on an understanding of the skills and capacities required to effectively learn using a PLE. Second, the offering of the course is intended to test whether learners can employ a PLE environment in order to develop those capacities. Thus, combined, the objectives of the course are intended to demonstrate whether learning may be self-directed with a PLE, or whether an additional pedagogy is required prior to the use of a PLE. Research will form an integral component of the course.

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    "This course attempts to teach the literacies I believe are needed to flourish in a connectivist environment."
    --Downes
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