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Gary Brown

Learning Assessment: The Regional Accreditors' Role - Measuring Stick - The Chronicle o... - 0 views

  • The National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment has just released a white paper about the regional accreditors’ role in prodding colleges to assess their students’ learning
  • All four presidents suggested that their campuses’ learning-assessment projects are fueled by Fear of Accreditors. One said that a regional accreditor “came down on us hard over assessment.” Another said, “Accreditation visit coming up. This drives what we need to do for assessment.”
  • Western Association of Schools and Colleges, Ms. Provezis reports, “almost every action letter to institutions over the last five years has required additional attention to assessment, with reasons ranging from insufficient faculty involvement to too little evidence of a plan to sustain assessment.”
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  • regional accreditors are more likely now than they were a decade ago to insist that colleges hand them evidence about student-learning outcomes.
  • The white paper gently criticizes the accreditors for failing to make sure that faculty members are involved in learning assessment.
  • “it would be good to know more about what would make assessment worthwhile to the faculty—for a better understanding of the source of their resistance.”
  • Many of the most visible and ambitious learning-assessment projects out there seem to strangely ignore the scholarly disciplines’ own internal efforts to improve teaching and learning.
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    fyi
Theron DesRosier

Tertiary21: 21st Century Assessment: The University of Farmville - 0 views

  • Carnegie Mellon University Professor Jesse Schell's talk on the future of gaming is thought provoking. It gives some interesting insights into what educational assessment might look like by mid 21st Century.
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    An interesting perspective on the future of assessment using the analogy of game design.
Theron DesRosier

Debate Over P vs. NP Proof Highlights Web Collaboration - NYTimes.com - 1 views

  • The potential of Internet-based collaboration was vividly demonstrated this month when complexity theorists used blogs and wikis to pounce on a claimed proof for one of the most profound and difficult problems facing mathematicians and computer scientists.
  • “The proof required the piecing together of principles from multiple areas within mathematics. The major effort in constructing this proof was uncovering a chain of conceptual links between various fields and viewing them through a common lens.”
  • In this case, however, the significant breakthrough may not be in the science, but rather in the way science is practiced.
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  • What was highly significant, however, was the pace of discussion and analysis, carried out in real time on blogs and a wiki that had been quickly set up for the purpose of collectively analyzing the paper.
  • Several of the researchers said that until now such proofs had been hashed out in colloquiums that required participants to be physically present at an appointed time. Now, with the emergence of Web-connected software programs it is possible for such collaborative undertakings to harness the brainpower of the world’s best thinkers on a continuous basis.
  • collaborative tools is paving the way for a second scientific revolution in the same way the printing press created a demarcation between the age of alchemy and the age of chemistry.
  • “The difference between the alchemists and the chemists was that the printing press was used to coordinate peer review,” he said. “The printing press didn’t cause the scientific revolution, but it wouldn’t have been possible without it.”
  • “It’s not just, ‘Hey, everybody, look at this,’ ” he said, “but rather a new set of norms is emerging about what it means to do mathematics, assuming coordinated participation.”
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    "The difference between the alchemists and the chemists was that the printing press was used to coordinate peer review," he said. "The printing press didn't cause the scientific revolution, but it wouldn't have been possible without it." "The difference between the alchemists and the chemists was that the printing press was used to coordinate peer review," he said. "The printing press didn't cause the scientific revolution, but it wouldn't have been possible without it."
Theron DesRosier

Learning from The Wisdom of Crowds | Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching - 1 views

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    In The New York Times article, "Scholars Test Web Alternative to Peer Review," Patricia Cohen writes that some humanities scholars are arguing "that in an era of digital media there is a better way to assess the quality of work. Instead of relying on a few experts selected by leading publications, they advocate using the Internet to expose scholarly thinking to the swift collective judgment of a much broader interested audience."
Joshua Yeidel

Start-Up Aspires to Make the World 'One Big Study Group' - Wired Campus - The Chronicle... - 2 views

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    A more modest attempt to "open up" education, using a study-group model rather than a course model like P2PU.
Joshua Yeidel

Mind - Research Upends Traditional Thinking on Study Habits - NYTimes.com - 2 views

  • “The contrast between the enormous popularity of the learning-styles approach within education and the lack of credible evidence for its utility is, in our opinion, striking and disturbing,” the researchers concluded.
  • “We have yet to identify the common threads between teachers who create a constructive learning atmosphere,” said Daniel T. Willingham, a psychologist at the University of Virginia and author of the book “Why Don’t Students Like School?”
  • psychologists have discovered that some of the most hallowed advice on study habits is flat wrong
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    "Evidence" that the "evidence" is not very effective to promote change.  Apparently the context is crucial to adoption.
Gary Brown

Brainless slime mould makes decisions like humans | Not Exactly Rocket Science | Discov... - 0 views

  • These results strongly suggest that, like humans, Physarum doesn’t attach any intrinsic value to the options that are available to it. Instead, it compares its alternatives. Add something new into the mix, and its decisions change.
  • But how does Physarum make decisions at all without a brain?  The answer is deceptively simple – it does so by committee. Every plasmodium is basically a big sac of fluid, where each part rhythmically contracts and expands, pushing the fluid inside back-and-forth. The rate of the contractions depends on what neighbouring parts of the sac are doing, and by the local environment. They happen faster when the plasmodium touches something attractive like food, and they slow down when repellent things like sunlight are nearby.
  • It’s the ultimate in collective decision-making and it allows Physarum to perform remarkable feats of “intelligence”, including simulating Tokyo’s transport network, solving mazes, and even driving robots.
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    This probably also apples to change theory....
Joshua Yeidel

The Creativity Crisis - Newsweek - 5 views

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    A "Creativity Gap" can be addressed through problem-based learning
Gary Brown

Op-Ed Contributor - Mind Over Mass Media - NYTimes.com - 5 views

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    Pinker sets the record straight, and we encounter these concerns regularly in our work. A good resource.
Joshua Yeidel

Six Things Your Hypothetical Kid's Coach Can Tell You about Teaching - ProfHacker - The... - 1 views

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    Common sense about teaching from a kid's coach perspective
Theron DesRosier

performance.learning.productivity: ID - Instructional Design or Interactivity Design in... - 1 views

  • The vast majority of structured learning is content-rich and interaction-poor. That’s understandable in the context of a 20th century mindset and how learning professionals have been taught to develop ‘learning’ events. But it simply isn’t appropriate for today’s world.
  • Dr Ebbinghaus’ experiment revealed we suffer an exponential ‘forgetting curve’ and that about 50% of context-free information is lost in the first hour after acquisition if there is no opportunity to reinforce it with practice.
  • The need to become Interactivity Designers. That’s what they need to do.
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  • We need designers who understand that learning comes from experience, practice, conversations and reflection, and are prepared to move away from massaging content into what they see as good instructional design. Designers need to get off the content bus and start thinking about, using, designing and exploiting learning environments full of experiences and interactivity.
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    "Dr Ebbinghaus' experiment revealed we suffer an exponential 'forgetting curve' and that about 50% of context-free information is lost in the first hour after acquisition if there is no opportunity to reinforce it with practice."
Joshua Yeidel

Can Learning Be Improved When the Budget Is in the Red? - Commentary - The Chronicle of... - 0 views

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    10 familiar strategies in neat bit-sized pieces
Joshua Yeidel

ILT - Dec 2009 issue - 2 views

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    How do you create a social learning enviornment for free, but wihtout a mish-mash of incompatible tools? Jane Hart investigates"... Google, which at least gives single signon, but other integrations are noteably lacking.
Joshua Yeidel

ILT - Nov 2009 issue - 0 views

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    "In three issues for Inside Learning Technologies, Jane Hart shares the rpos and cons of building three types of social learning environment, and how to deliver them at low or no cost."
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    Assessment is not even mentioned, but the series is still useful.
Theron DesRosier

Key Social Learning Roles « Daretoshare - 0 views

  • Premise:  Learning communities or networks thrive because its members possess certain skills and capabilities.  Community members should be able to perform one or more of the five roles described in the table that follows.
Theron DesRosier

An Interview with Anil Dash, Director of Expert Labs | techPresident - 1 views

  • Expert Labs is a new, independent non-profit effort that's trying at its most ambitious to improve the decisions policy makers make, by giving them the tools to tap into crowdsourcing in the same way that private companies do every day. We're part of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (the folks who publish the journal Science) and we're backed by the MacArthur Foundation.
Theron DesRosier

How Smartphones and Handheld Computers Are Bringing on an Educational Revolution | Fast... - 0 views

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    "As smartphones and handheld computers move into classrooms worldwide, we may be witnessing the start of an educational revolution. How technology could unleash childhood creativity -- and transform the role of the teacher. "
Jayme Jacobson

Blurring the Boundaries: Social Networking & ePortfolio Development - 2 views

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    Helen Barrett does a nice job of formally bringing together a number of threads we've been exploring. She weaves in Pink's new book "Drive," Csíkszentmihályi and Flow and many other popular but relevant voices. I think this is worth absorbing into some of our work.
Theron DesRosier

The Problem with the Data-Information-Knowledge-Wisdom Hierarchy - The Conversation - H... - 3 views

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    "But knowledge is not a result merely of filtering or algorithms. It results from a far more complex process that is social, goal-driven, contextual, and culturally-bound. We get to knowledge - especially "actionable" knowledge - by having desires and curiosity, through plotting and play, by being wrong more often than right, by talking with others and forming social bonds, by applying methods and then backing away from them, by calculation and serendipity, by rationality and intuition, by institutional processes and social roles."
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    An interresting take on assumptions about knowledge.
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    Really interesting quote, Theron. I wonder if it's a chunk that could be used as a prompt for a faculty discussion, to open up the dialogue about what is learning. And then how does a program design a curriculum and syllabi / assignments to teach and assess, towards a much broader understanding of knowledge (and skills)?
Gary Brown

Encyclopedia of Educational Technology - 1 views

  • The revised taxonomy (Anderson and Krathwohl, 2001) incorporates both the kind of knowledge to be learned (knowledge dimension) and the process used to learn (cognitive process), allowing for the instructional designer to efficiently align objectives to assessment techniques. Both dimensions are illustrated in the following table that can be used to help write clear, focused objectives.
  • Teachers may also use the new taxonomy dimensions to examine current objectives in units, and to revise the objectives so that they will align with one another, and with assessments.
  • Anderson and Krathwohl also list specific verbs that can be used when writing objectives for each column of the cognitive process dimension.
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    Bloom has not gone away, and this revision helps delimit the nominalist implications
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