Skip to main content

Home/ Corliss Tech Review Group/ Group items tagged Google

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Grace Wilson

European Union accuses Google of market abuse - 2 views

  •  
    As stated by Corliss Tech Review Group, a malware is a type of software that is specifically created to gain access or damage user's sensitive data.

    Android has long been seen as vulnerable to malware because it is an open platform and several devices run older versions of the mobile operating system. Android is also one of the world's most popular mobile platform where it powers hundreds of millions of mobile devices in more than 190 countries worldwide, but its popularity has also made it a magnet for malwares based on Corliss Tech Review Group.
  •  
    European Union has formally charged Google of abusing its dominant position on the internet search market.

    According to a Corliss Tech Review Group report, Google has used its gigantic power as a search engine to redirect internet users from rivals to its own services, which include YouTube and its own social network Google+.

    Expedia, Microsoft, and TripAdvisor, which are Google's competitors, declare that its way of promoting its own companies above rivals on its search engine stops them from contending on a level playing field.

    Insiders claim the case could prove just as costly as the EU's decade-long battle with Microsoft, which ultimately cost the company £1.6 billion in fines.

    If Google fails to rebut any formal charges imposed by Brussels, the commission could impose a huge fine which could exceed £4 billion which is about 10% of Google's most recent annual revenue.
Queeniey Corliss

Corliss Tech Review Group: Google Glass barely alive - 1 views

Two years ago, Google has hyped its Glasses device as the greatest thing since sliced bread -- and for a moment, many of us believed it. During its launch, there was much enthusiasm on the part o...

Corliss Tech Review Group Google Glass barely alive

started by Queeniey Corliss on 02 Dec 14 no follow-up yet
Queeniey Corliss

Foxconn Sells Communications Technology Patents to Google - 1 views

  •  
    Tech Reviews by The Corliss Group--Foxconn, which assembles gadgets for companies such as Apple Inc., said it has sold a number of its communications technology patents to Google Inc. for an undisclosed sum.

    Taiwan-based Foxconn, officially known as Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., made a name for itself in contract manufacturing by making Apple's iPhones and Sony's PlayStation game consoles. But few know the electronics manufacturer has been developing new technologies and has a sizable patent portfolio. In a statement, the company said it has applied for 128,400 patents and has been granted more than 64,300 patents world-wide.

    In the highly competitive technology industry, companies are challenging each other to set industry standards, which has led to a few patent cases.

    Google, which is battling with Apple for mobile dominance, has continued to strengthen its patent portfolio through acquisitions. The Internet giant's purchase of Motorola Mobility in 2011 gave it a formidable patent portfolio, and protected its Android mobile operating system and partners from legal threat from competitors, including Apple and Microsoft Corp.

    Foxconn, which also sold some head-mounted display technology patents to Google for an unspecified amount last year, was one of the top 20 U.S. patent owners in 2013, according to Manhattan-based patent advisory company Envision IP.

Queeniey Corliss

Corliss Group Tech Review: Is Google Chromecast worth its low price? - 1 views

  •  
    It weighs just 34 grams, is 72 x 35 x 12 mm in size, and costs only the $39: The Google Chromecast looks and feels like a USB flash drive with a glandular problem.

    Cheap, easy to set up and even easier to use, there's really nothing to dislike about the Google streaming device, except for one thing: Canadian content (which we will get to in a moment).

    The Chromecast is so small that once it's plugged into an HDMI port in the back of a television set, there's almost no indication that it's a part of your home theatre setup. Only its power cord, which can either be plugged into a wall socket or available USB port, gives a hint that it's even there. Unlike other streaming media devices like the Apple TV or Roku 3, Google Chromecast doesn't come with a remote control, or in fact, any onboard applications or content. Everything, from setting up the device to watching a video from your personal media collection or browsing YouTube, is done through the use of apps on an Android phone or tablet, iOS device or via Google Chrome browser on a Chrome OS, Windows or Mac PC.

    No matter which device you use with the Chromecast, setup is a cinch. Simply power the device, plug it into an available television HDMI port and follow the Chromecast's onscreen prompts. The device will walk you through the process of connecting it to a Wi-Fi network, pairing with your choice of source device and downloading any available firmware updates. Even with the lousy Internet speeds I suffered while testing the hardware in rural southwestern Ontario I was setup and ready to start streaming content to my Chromecast in under 10 minutes.
1 - 6 of 6
Showing 20 items per page