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Ryan Archer

The Distracted Classroom - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • Distraction occurs, the authors argue, when we are pursuing a goal that really matters and something blocks our efforts to achieve it.
  • They argue that distraction actually arises from a conflict between two fundamental features of our brain: our ability to create and plan high-level goals versus our ability to control our minds and our environment as we take steps to complete those goals.
  • cognitive control abilities
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  • Our cognitive control is really quite limited: We have a restricted ability to distribute, divide, and sustain attention; actively hold detailed information in mind; and concurrently manage or even rapidly switch between competing goals."
  • while older adults can fully retain their ability to focus their attention, their capacity to block out irrelevant distractions diminishes with age.
  • That’s one reason why older adults may have more trouble concentrating on a conversation in a crowded restaurant than younger people.
  • What goal had I established for Kate’s learning that day? How had I created an environment that supported her ability to achieve that goal? And perhaps most important — assuming that the class had a learning goal that mattered for her — did she know about it?
  • The more powerful the goals we establish for ourselves, and the more we feel ownership over those goals, the more we are able to pursue them in the face of both internal and external distractions.
  • Most of us can shut out distractions when we are pursuing something that really matters to us.
  • Who creates them? How much do they matter? And how well do students understand them?
garth nichols

Problem or opportunity? Depends on how you look at things. - The Principal of Change - 5 views

  • You cannot simply swap out the word, “problem” with “opportunity”; your thinking has to shift that way.  For example, a subtle change in the question, “When am I going to have time to do this?”, to, “How would I work this into my day in a meaningful way?”, changes the way we frame what is in front of us.  One question is looking for ways things won’t work, and the other is trying to find a way.

  • A subtle change in language, can change how we move forward, and how we tackle the challenges  embrace the opportunities in front of us.
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    Hey everyone, let's make a change in our language, so that we can make a real change in our schools!
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    I love the power of making subtle changes in our language. I am going to take this quote and post it in my office- so good to remember going forward.
    I've been trying to encourage my students (and my own children) to change from saying "have to" to "get" to help them see the opportunity in their everyday actions. While not always successful, it can have a profound effect on the way they see things.
ebdaigle

Grammar | Khan Academy - 1 views

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    Please let open software take care of this vital component of language learning, so I can teach 21st century skills. Thank you internet! Thank you Khan! Thank you @jmedved
ebdaigle

Has Your School Reached an Edtech Plateau? Here's the Key to Moving the Needle (EdSurge... - 1 views

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    Fantastic hyperlinks to classroom technology: Whether your role is as an administrator, teacher, parent, or student leader, if you're reading this, you are probably interested in helping other school community stakeholders understand the power of technology in a teaching and learning environment.
mrdanbailey61

Makerspaces in Libraries: Play, Discovery, and Collegiality | Whyte | The iJournal: Gra... - 1 views

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    This article is from the journal of U of T's School of Information Science. Based on research in public libraries, it speaks about the importance of promoting play, discovery, and collegiality in makerspaces. It offers some encouragement re: letting students mess around, after at least a little guidance!
mrdanbailey61

Educational Leadership:Relationships First:Fox Taming and Teaching - 1 views

  • Little Prince asks the fox to play with him—to enter his world. "I cannot play with you," says the fox. "I am not tamed."
  • The curious traveler asks what it means to be tamed.
  • "You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed."
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  • that's the essence of "real" teaching—the transformative kind that sends a young person forward on a journey they understand to be their own
  • It's about a teacher intending to see beauty—what is invisible to the eye—in the child who passes by.
  • It's about knowing that establishing ties must start the learning journey
  • John Hattie (2009) points to positive teacher-student relationships as one of the most potent catalysts for student achievement.
  • ne of the great satisfactions of teaching is that those of us who teach are the primary beneficiaries of the process. We are re-made each year
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    This article was referred to me by my colleague Nicole Davies as I was writing and thinking about making contact with students in more meaningful ways in the classroom. A neat metaphor...
garth nichols

6 Illustrations That Show What It's Like in an Introvert's Head - 5 views

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    Love these illustrations as a way to visualize what a quiet student is doing on the inside!
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    Very interesting article - the illustrations gave me a lot to think about. Knowing a bit of this now, it will be interesting to think about how to manage collaborative work, from grouping to helping students to find the right pacing so that everyone has time to figure out what they need to say and do. In short, getting the tortoise and the hare to the start line at roughly the same time?
lesmcbeth

MLTS Sparks - 3 views

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    A series of videos about the future of education...great food for thought, sparks for discussion, etc.
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    These look great - thank you. I partciularly like the idea of group testing near the end of in A Test of Value.
d_rutherford_8

5 Strategies to Deepen Student Collaboration | Edutopia - 2 views

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      In order to make collaborative tasks authentic, we have to make them complex enough that working together makes sense.
  • One way to do this is through rigorous projects that require students to identify a problem (for example, balancing population growth in their city with protection of existing green spaces) and agree—through research, discussion, debate, and time to develop their ideas—on a solution which they must then propose together.
  • We have to help students understand the what, why, and how of collaboration. We can do this in several ways:
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      It's not enough to just force student groups; we have to get them to see the benefits of collaboration and what successful collaboration looks like. It's important for us to teach them these skills.
  • Design meaningful team roles that relate to the content and to the task.
  • assessing students both individually and as a group.
  • individual accountability
  • small groups
  • evaluate their own participation and effort
  • Many group projects are based on efficiency, dividing labor to create a product in the most effective way possible. This focus on the product means that we often ignore the process of collaboration.
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      Focus on the process in addition to the product to see how students have benefitted from the collaborative process.
  • Collaboration should not just strengthen students’ existing skills but ensure that their interactions stretch existing knowledge and expand one another’s expertise.
  • we want to ensure that students don’t just occupy the same physical space but that they share an intellectual space—that they learn more, do more, and experience more together than they would alone.
lesmcbeth

A Lightning-Fast Way To Make A Digital Prototype | Co.Design | business + design - 3 views

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    How to prototype with Keynote
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    Finally, a use for Keynote ;)

    Make sure to export to PDF so the rest of the world can open it.
garth nichols

Math Teachers Should Encourage Their Students to Count Using Their Fingers in Class - T... - 2 views

  • This is not an isolated event—schools across the country regularly ban finger use in classrooms or communicate to students that they are babyish. This is despite a compelling and rather surprising branch of neuroscience that shows the importance of an area of our brain that “sees” fingers, well beyond the time and age that people use their fingers to count.
  • Remarkably, brain researchers know that we “see” a representation of our fingers in our brains, even when we do not use fingers in a calculation
  • Evidence from both behavioral and neuroscience studies shows that when people receive training on ways to perceive and represent their own fingers, they get better at doing so, which leads to higher mathematics achievement. The tasks we have developed for use in schools and homes (see below) are based on the training programs researchers use to improve finger-perception quality.
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  • The need for and importance of finger perception could even be the reason that pianists, and other musicians, often display higher mathematical understanding than people who don’t learn a musical instrument.
  • Teachers should celebrate and encourage finger use among younger learners and enable learners of any age to strengthen this brain capacity through finger counting and use. They can do so by engaging students in a range of classroom and home activities, such as:


    Give the students colored dots on their fingers and ask them to touch the corresponding piano keys:

  • Visual math is powerful for all learners. A few years ago Howard Gardner proposed a theory of multiple intelligences, suggesting that people have different approaches to learning, such as those that are visual, kinesthetic, or logical. T
  • To engage students in productive visual thinking, they should be asked, at regular intervals, how they see mathematical ideas, and to draw what they see. They can be given activities with visual questions and they can be asked to provide visual solutions to questions.
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    Great article on the strategies and rethinking of them in Math class for younger grades
lesmcbeth

GV guide to research - 2 views

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    Great resource on user testing.
Justin Medved

How Do I Differentiate Through Project-Based Learning? - TeachThought PD - 3 views

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    "There are many opportunities to differentiate from the start of a PBL unit to its climactic conclusion. In my book, So All Can Learn: A Practical Guide for Differentiation (February 2017), I explain that the key is to think of Differentiation as a lens that's used to view lessons and units for planned opportunities of supports that meet all learner needs. For PBL units, as with traditional units, lesson planning is where the learning experiences take shape. Here are some PBL strategies that can be differentiated to bring out the power of meeting learner needs, so all can learn.
    Strong PBL units include standard elements that make for rich experiences. They include:
    Authentic Purpose
    Entry Event
    Need to Know protocol
    Checkpoints
    Student Voice"
mrdanbailey61

Framework for 21st Century Learning - P21 - 4 views

  • “21st century student outcomes”
  • are the skills, knowledge and expertise students should master to succeed in work and life in the 21st century.
  • Disciplines include:

    English, reading or language arts
    World languages
    Arts
    Mathematics
    Economics
    Science
    Geography
    History
    Government and Civics

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  • In addition to these subjects,
  • promoting understanding of academic content at much higher levels by weaving 21st century interdisciplinary themes into curriculum:
  • Learning and innovation skills increasingly are being recognized as the skills that separate students who are prepared for increasingly complex life and work environments in the 21st century, and those who are not.
  • A focus on creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration is essential to prepare students for the future.
  • To be effective in the 21st century, citizens and workers must be able to create, evaluate, and effectively utilize information, media, and technology.
    • Today's students need to develop thinking skills, content knowledge, and social and emotional competencies to navigate complex life and work environments. P21's essential Life and Career Skills include::

      • Flexibility & Adaptability
      • Initiative & Self Direction
      • Social & Cross-Cultural Skills
      • Productivity & Accountability
  • Leadership & Responsibility
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    This page gives an overview of a framework for 21st century skills and learning. I like how it values all of the academic disciplines and gives links to different sites that focus on broader interdisciplinary themes, innovation skills, information, media, and technology skills, and life and career skills.
Lara Gee

DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP - SCREENAGERS - 3 views

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    This is a great resource - I particularly liked the link to the infographic. We just has a workshop on this for our students in grades 4-8 - I have sent it along to teachers at our school. They might get some good ideas for followup discussions.
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