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Joanne Kiernan

Infosearcher - 0 views

  • variety of technical, cognitive, social and emotional skills which users need in order to function effectively in a digital environment.
  • Graphic literacy, Navigation, Context, Skepticism, Focus, Ethical Behavior
  • Graphic literacy – thinking visually
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  • Graphic
  • Graphic literacy
  • Navigation – developing a sense of Internet geography
  • Context – seeing the connections
  • Focus – practicing reflection and deep thinking
  • Skepticism – learning to evaluate information
  • Ethical behavior – understanding the rules of cyberspace
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    Pam Berger's blog. This entry: learning in the Web2.0 world talks about skills to teach students - graphic literacy,navigation, context, skepticism, focus and ethical behavior
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J Black

When NOT to Use Social Media - ReadWriteWeb - 0 views

  • You fight with your employees: In some businesses, management and employees are constantly at odds. (An example was given of a unionized workforce where management-labor strife was common). This is also not the type of company that should encourage employees to communicate directly with customers via social media. Management skepticism: If management doesn't believe in social media, then employees who have been told for years that public communication needs to be filtered will be hesitant to try out a new medium which requires them to speak openly. In this scenario, management needs to encourage and reward participation to make social media work. If they don't, it will fail. Strategic Vacuum: Don't do social media just to do social media. If a company doesn't know what they're trying to accomplish, then there will be nothing to measure and no way to determine success. Just as with any other initiative a company takes on, there needs to be an objective...and that objective shouldn't be to distribute a press release.
  • only 2% of businesses are using Twitter as a marketing tool. Only 2% - can you believe that?
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    Educators would be wise to examine if these are some of the reasons email, admin blogging and other forms of social media are failing in the public school systems.
Paul Beaufait

10 Reasons Why I Want My Students to Blog - Getting Smart by Susan Lucille Davis - DigLN, edchat, EdTech - 42 views

  • For my money (which usually means free), blogging provides the best venue for teaching student writing.
  • This emphasis on process encourages reflection and re-thinking, doubling back on earlier posts and feedback to watch how the process of learning unfolds.
  • Transparency requires being comfortable in your own skin; it requires being who you say you are; it requires a healthy openness and an equally healthy sense of privacy armed with a modicum of skepticism.
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  • Being truly Internet savvy in today’s world means learning how to be honest about who you are, professional in your dealings with others, and willing to learn openly from mistakes as well as from successes.
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    Davis (2012.10.22) supports her assertion, "For my money (which usually means free), blogging provides the best venue for teaching student writing" ( ¶1).
erikerickson

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | MindShift - 41 views

  • pupils today can change the way they study to exploit the brain’s quirky learning processes, using the strategies revealed by memory and learning research
  • Students need to understand that learning happens not only during reading and studying, but in all sorts of ways, so that they can examine their own habits to know which ones may be helping or not, and make adjustments
  • We can be tactical in our schooling.
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  • forgetting serves as a powerful spam filter
  • when the brain has to work hard to retrieve a half-forgotten memory (such as when reviewing new vocabulary words you learned the day before), it re-doubles the strength of that memory.
  • The brain is a foraging learner.
  • The human brain evolved to pick up valuable pieces of information here and there, on the fly, all the time, and put it all together
  • and it’s not only during study or practice
  • By foraging in this way, the brain is “building knowledge continually
  • Forgetting isn’t always bad.
  • Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.
  • Varying the studying environment
  • can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.
  • A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.
  • Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it
  • Experimenting With Learning Tactics
  • benefits of sleep (which improves retention and comprehension of what you learn), perceptual learning modules and mixing up different kinds of related problems or skills in practice sessions instead of repetitively rehearsing just one skill at a time.
  • teachers see all sorts of reforms come and go, and they’re skeptical
  • Surviving the Modern Jungle
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    Chen sums up an interview about Benedict Carey's book, How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens, highlighting and exemplifying take-away messages for self-directed learners as well as teachers.
Nigel Coutts

Questioning our Assumptions and Considering Multiple Viewpoints - The Learner's Way - 5 views

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    In "Factfulness", Hans Rosling shares a valuable insight into why we must question our assumptions. In times when we are bombarded with information, when false claims abound, having a disposition towards scepticism seems vital. Rosling urges us to not only question the facts we are presented with but the internal biases which influence how we interpret these facts.
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