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Rudy Garns

The Moral Behavior of Super-Duper Artificial Intelligences - 0 views

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    David Chalmers gave a talk today (at the Toward a Science of Consciousness conference in Tucson) arguing that it is fairly likely that sometime in the next few centuries we will create artificial intelligence (perhaps silicon, perhaps biological) considerably more intelligent than ourselves -- and then those intelligent creatures will create even more intelligent successors, and so on, until there exist creatures that are vastly more intelligent than we are. The Splintered Mind
Rudy Garns

Ned Block on Consciousness - 0 views

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    Ned Block explores some of the philosophical problems of consciousness in conversation with Nigel Warburton in the latest episode of the Philosophy Bites podcast. Block believes that not all phenomena of consciousness are directly available to us. Sound contradictory?
Rudy Garns

The origin of concepts - 0 views

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    This lecture is part of the special series of lectures 'The Study of Cognition and Culture Today' supported by the LSE Annual Fund, organised by the department of anthropology of the LSE and the International Cognition and Culture Institute.
Rudy Garns

Beyond Human Talks - 0 views

shared by Rudy Garns on 11 Feb 10 - Cached
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    On March 27, 2009 the Center for the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin Madison held a symposium titled "What is Human?" devoted to "exploring the limits and excesses of the human across the division of the humanities and the sciences." These are some of the talks from that seminar.
Rudy Garns

Some Questions on Heterophenomenology - 0 views

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    From the blog Brains
Rudy Garns

Making Sense of Dennett's Views on Introspection - 0 views

  • our judgments about our experience
  • what's in stream of experience behind those judgments
  • One can be wrong about what he sees, but can't be wrong about what he thinks he sees.
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    Dan Dennett and I have something in common: We both say that people often go grossly wrong about even their own ongoing conscious experience (for my view, see here). Of course Dennett is one of the world's most eminent philosophers and I'm, well, not. But another difference is this: Dennett also often says (as I don't) that subjects can no more go wrong about their experience than a fiction writer can go wrong about his fictions (e.g., 1991, p. 81, 94) and that their reports about their experience are "incorrigible" in the sense that no one could ever be justified in believing them mistaken (e.g., 2002, p. 13-14). - The Splintered Mind:
Rudy Garns

How to Improve on Heterophenomenology - 0 views

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    When these changes are made, heterophenomenology turns into the self-measurement methodology of first- person data that I have defended in previous papers.
Rudy Garns

Algorithmic Inelegance - 0 views

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    There's something deeply appealing about making logic manifest and producing tools that do intense computational work for you at the click of a button; there can also be something deeply obsessive about being able to hone software to make it more elegant and efficient and, to the programmer's eye, more beautiful. The designers of software usually aspire to economy of code, clarity in its operation, and powerful algorithms that, with mathematical and logical beauty, do the work of generating a sophisticated result. We tend to look down on the "kludge," the clumsy addition to fix a problem, or the brute force approach of working case by case to force a desired result (although, to be sure, I've seen enough code to know that the awkward hack is ubiquitous). § SEEDMAGAZINE.COM
Rudy Garns

The Evolution of Language - 0 views

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    Language is an innate faculty, rather than a learned behavior. This idea was the primary insight of the Chomskyan revolution that helped found the field of modern linguistics in the late 1950s, and its implications are both simple and profound. If innate, language must be genetic. It is hardwired within us from conception and evolved from structures and genes with analogues existing throughout the animal kingdom. In a sense, language is universal. Yet we humans are the only species with the ability for what may rightly be called language and, moreover, we have specific linguistic behaviors that seem to have appeared only within the past 200,000 years-an eye-blink of evolution.
Rudy Garns

Evolution of Adaptive Behaviour in Robots by Means of Darwinian Selection - 0 views

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    These examples of experimental evolution with robots verify the power of evolution by mutation, recombination, and natural selection. In all cases, robots initially exhibited completely uncoordinated behaviour because their genomes had random values. However, a few hundreds of generations of random mutations and selective reproduction were sufficient to promote the evolution of efficient behaviours in a wide range of environmental conditions. The ability of robots to orientate, escape predators, and even cooperate is particularly remarkable given that they had deliberately simple genotypes directly mapped into the connection weights of neural networks comprising only a few dozen neurons. PLoS Biology
Rudy Garns

What the small-brained hobbit reveals about primate evolution - 0 views

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    Is bigger always better? When it comes to brain size, that has long been the prevailing theory-at least among big-brained humans. But a new analysis shows that in the course of primate evolution, brains and brawn haven't always been on the rise.
Rudy Garns

Does the Internet Change How We Think? - Sharon Begley - Newsweek.com - 0 views

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    The ways the Internet supposedly affects thought are as apocalyptic as they are speculative, since all the above are supported by anecdote, not empirical data. So it is refreshing to hear how 109 philosophers, neurobiologists, and other scholars answered, "How is the Internet changing the way you think?" That is the "annual question" at the online salon edge.org, where every year science impresario, author, and literary agent John Brockman poses a puzzler for his flock of scientists and other thinkers.
Rudy Garns

How is the internet changing the way you think? - 0 views

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    EDGE 2010
Rudy Garns

Gorillas 'ape humans' over games - 0 views

  • Dr Tanner said: "Though the age at which gorilla games begin may be later in gorillas than in humans, and may depend on the challenges and artefacts available in a particular group's habitat, gorillas definitely enjoy the same kind of sporting competition we do."
Rudy Garns

Feet hold the key to human hand evolution - 0 views

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    Scientists may have solved the mystery of how human hands became nimble enough to make and manipulate stone tools.
Rudy Garns

Warneken Laboratory for Developmental Studies - 0 views

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    child & chimp cooperation
Rudy Garns

Meat may be the reason humans outlive apes - 0 views

  • humans apparently evolved unique variants in a cholesterol-transporting gene, apolipoprotein E, which regulates chronic inflammation as well as many aspects of aging in the brain and arteries.
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    Chimps and apes are genetically so similar to humans - and their human-like gestures do remind us how close we are on the family tree - that scientists have long been puzzled why they don't live as long as we do. Diet-related evolutionary changes may explain it.
Rudy Garns

The Human Spark, episode 1 | john hawks weblog - 0 views

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    Hawks provides a brief summary/commentary of the PBS Human Spark, ep. 1
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