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Rudy Garns

Similar brain cortex changes during human development and evolution - 0 views

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    Hill et al. show that expansion of the human cortex during development involves the same brain areas that have changed the most in the evolutionary expansion from monkey to human brains. They suggest that it is beneficial for regions of recent evolutionary expansion to remain less mature at birth, perhaps to increase the influence of postnatal experience on their development.
Rudy Garns

Does the Internet Change How We Think? - Sharon Begley - Newsweek.com - 0 views

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    The ways the Internet supposedly affects thought are as apocalyptic as they are speculative, since all the above are supported by anecdote, not empirical data. So it is refreshing to hear how 109 philosophers, neurobiologists, and other scholars answered, "How is the Internet changing the way you think?" That is the "annual question" at the online salon edge.org, where every year science impresario, author, and literary agent John Brockman poses a puzzler for his flock of scientists and other thinkers.
Rudy Garns

Synaesthesia induced by hypnosis - 0 views

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    Wired Science has an interesting preview of an upcoming study that used hypnosis to induce colour-number synaesthesia in highly hypnotisable participants. (Mind Hacks)
Rudy Garns

The Co-evolution of Language and the Brain - 0 views

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    The Co-evolution of Language and the Brain:
    A Review of two contrastive views (Pinker & Deacon).
    (Printed 2001 in Grazer Linguistische Studien GLS 55, 1-20)
    Ken Ramshøj Christensen
    Department of English, University of Aarhus
Rudy Garns

The Extended Mind (Andy Clark and David Chalmers) - 0 views

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    "Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin? The question invites two standard replies. Some accept the demarcations of skin and skull, and say that what is outside the body is outside the mind. Others are impressed by arguments suggesting that the meaning of our words "just ain't in the head", and hold that this externalism about meaning carries over into an externalism about mind. We propose to pursue a third position. We advocate a very different sort of externalism: an active externalism, based on the active role of the environment in driving cognitive processes." Published in Analysis 58:10-23, 1998. Reprinted in (P. Grim, ed) The Philosopher's Annual, vol XXI, 1998.
Rudy Garns

Primate brain evolution: Integrating multiple lines of evidence - 0 views

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    "One of the general characteristics that make primates unique are the larger brain sizes compared to body sizes in relation to other organism. His graph is limited in that it shows only the comparison of brain to body sizes of a tribe, within the family Hominidae, under a much larger taxonomic organization, the order Primates." (Primatology.net)
Rudy Garns

What will the neanderthal genome teach us about human brain evolution? - 0 views

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    "Palaeoanthropologists at the Max Planck Institute, in collaboration with scientists at 454 Life Sciences Corp., of Branford, Connecticut, have begun a two-year project to sequence the neanderthal genome. The start of the Neanderthal Genome Project coincides with the 150th anniversary of the discovery of the specimen-type Homo neanderthalensis fossil in the Neander valley near Dusseldorf, Germany." (Neurophilosophy)
Rudy Garns

Cognitive Evolution and the Definition of Human Nature (pdf) - 0 views

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    Cognitive Evolution and the Definition of Human Nature. Philosophy of Science Monographs, Morris Foundation, Little Rock, Arkansas, 2000, 31pp.
Rudy Garns

Evolutionary Origins of the Social Brain (pdf) - 0 views

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    Evolutionary Origins of the Social Brain. In O. Vilarroya, & F.F i Argimon, (Eds.) Social Brain Matters: Stances on the Neurobiology of Social Cognition. Rodopi, 2007, 18: 215-222.
Rudy Garns

Without Miracles: Brain Evolution and Development: The Selection of Neurons and Synapses - 0 views

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    "The most complex object yet discovered anywhere in the universe is the organ that fills the space between our ears. Although weighing only about 1300 to 1500 grams (three to four pounds), the human brain contains over 11 billion specialized nerve cells, or neurons, capable of receiving, processing, and relaying the electrochemical pulses on which all our sensations, actions, thoughts, and emotions depend.[2] But it is not the sheer number of neurons alone that is most striking about the brain, but how they are organized and interconnected. And to understand how neurons communicate with each other we first must consider their typical structure."
Rudy Garns

What it's like to be a bat - 0 views

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    "Not many people think about what it's like to be a bat, but for those who do, it's enlightening and potentially groundbreaking for understanding aspects of the human brain and nervous system. Cynthia Moss, a member of the Neuroscience and Cognitive Science program at the University of Maryland, College Park, Md., is one of few researchers who spend time trying to get into the heads of bats."
Rudy Garns

Complex Synapses Drove Brain Evolution - 0 views

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    "One of the great scientific challenges is to understand the design principles and origins of the human brain. New research has shed light on the evolutionary origins of the brain and how it evolved into the remarkably complex structure found in humans." Science Daily
Rudy Garns

Comparative Mammalian Brain Collections: Brain Evolution - 0 views

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    "Evidence of brain evolution can be seen in various fields of biology, such as paleontology, ethology, behavioral biology, cognitive psychology, molecular biology and genetics."
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