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John Evans

How Elementary School Teachers' Biases Can Discourage Girls From Math and Science - NYT... - 0 views

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    "We know that women are underrepresented in math and science jobs. What we don't know is why it happens.

    There are various theories, and many of them focus on childhood. Parents and toy-makers discourage girls from studying math and science. So do their teachers. Girls lack role models in those fields, and grow up believing they wouldn't do well in them.

    All these factors surely play some role. A new study points to the influence of teachers' unconscious biases, but it also highlights how powerful a little encouragement can be. Early educational experiences have a quantifiable effect on the math and science courses the students choose later, and eventually the jobs they get and the wages they earn."
John Evans

Writing Your Way to Happiness - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    "The scientific research on the benefits of so-called expressive writing is surprisingly vast. Studies have shown that writing about oneself and personal experiences can improve mood disorders, help reduce symptoms among cancer patients, improve a person's health after a heart attack, reduce doctor visits and even boost memory.

    Now researchers are studying whether the power of writing - and then rewriting - your personal story can lead to behavioral changes and improve happiness."
John Evans

Study Finds Reading to Children of All Ages Grooms Them to Read More on Their Own - NYT... - 0 views

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    "Cue the hand-wringing about digital distraction: Fewer children are reading books frequently for fun, according to a new report released Thursday by Scholastic, the children's book publisher.

    In a 2014 survey of just over 1,000 children ages 6 to 17, only 31 percent said they read a book for fun almost daily, down from 37 percent four years ago.

    There were some consistent patterns among the heavier readers: For the younger children - ages 6 to 11 - being read aloud to regularly and having restricted online time were correlated with frequent reading; for the older children - ages 12 to 17 - one of the largest predictors was whether they had time to read on their own during the school day."
John Evans

Privacy Concerns for ClassDojo and Other Tracking Apps for Schoolchildren - NYTimes.com - 4 views

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    "Many teachers say the app helps them automate the task of recording classroom conduct, as well as allowing them to communicate directly with parents.

    But some parents, teachers and privacy law scholars say ClassDojo, along with other unproven technologies that record sensitive information about students, is being adopted without sufficiently considering the ramifications for data privacy and fairness, like where and how the data might eventually be used."
John Evans

500 Prompts for Narrative and Personal Writing - NYTimes.com - 1 views

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    "Every school day since 2009 we've asked students a question based on an article in the New York Times. Five years later, we've collected 500 of them that invite narrative and personal writing and pulled them all together in one place. Consider it a companion to the list of 200 argumentative writing prompts we posted earlier this year."
John Evans

A Natural Fix for A.D.H.D. - NYTimes.com - 1 views

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    "ATTENTION deficit hyperactivity disorder is now the most prevalent psychiatric illness of young people in America, affecting 11 percent of them at some point between the ages of 4 and 17. The rates of both diagnosis and treatment have increased so much in the past decade that you may wonder whether something that affects so many people can really be a disease.

    And for a good reason. Recent neuroscience research shows that people with A.D.H.D. are actually hard-wired for novelty-seeking - a trait that had, until relatively recently, a distinct evolutionary advantage. Compared with the rest of us, they have sluggish and underfed brain reward circuits, so much of everyday life feels routine and understimulating.

    To compensate, they are drawn to new and exciting experiences and get famously impatient and restless with the regimented structure that characterizes our modern world. In short, people with A.D.H.D. may not have a disease, so much as a set of behavioral traits that don't match the expectations of our contemporary culture."
John Evans

How Brain Myths Could Hurt Kids - NYTimes.com - 4 views

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    "The idea that we only use 10 percent of our brains has been roundly debunked - but, according to Paul Howard-Jones, an associate professor of neuroscience and education, teachers don't necessarily know that. In an article in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, he reveals the disturbing prevalence of this and other "neuromyths" in classrooms around the world, and explains why they can be so damaging."
John Evans

How Brain Myths Could Hurt Kids - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    "The idea that we only use 10 percent of our brains has been roundly debunked - but, according to Paul Howard-Jones, an associate professor of neuroscience and education, teachers don't necessarily know that. In an article in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, he reveals the disturbing prevalence of this and other "neuromyths" in classrooms around the world, and explains why they can be so damaging"
John Evans

The Secret of Effective Motivation - NYTimes.com - 3 views

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    "THERE are two kinds of motive for engaging in any activity: internal and instrumental. If a scientist conducts research because she wants to discover important facts about the world, that's an internal motive, since discovering facts is inherently related to the activity of research. If she conducts research because she wants to achieve scholarly renown, that's an instrumental motive, since the relation between fame and research is not so inherent. Often, people have both internal and instrumental motives for doing what they do."
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