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Enoch Hale

Home - Leading Lines - 0 views

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    Podcast by Derek Bruff and his Vanderbilt center team. A podcast on educational technology in higher education.
Enoch Hale

How Teaching is Like Composting | Faculty Focus - 1 views

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    "I started composting at our summer place in 2009, and now I'm a convert. In the summer, we live on an island that's mostly rock covered with something the locals call "organic matter." Growing anything this far north on this soil base is challenging, but compost has made a big difference. My bleeding hearts, campanulas, delphinium, phlox, and coral bells are far more impressive than they used to be."
Enoch Hale

ReducingStereotypeThreat.org - 0 views

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    "Reducingstereotypethreat.org was created by two social psychologists as a resource for faculty, teachers, students, and the general public interested in the phenomenon of stereotype threat. This website offers summaries of research on stereotype threat and discusses unresolved issues and controversies in the research literature. Included are some research-based suggestions for reducing the negative consequences of stereotyping, particularly in academic settings."
Enoch Hale

Understanding Project-Based Learning in the Online Classroom - 1 views

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    "In reality, the main value of project-based learning is that it teaches students to ask the right questions. Traditional assignments predefine the information that the students will use. Project-based learning puts students into the position of having to determine what information they need by asking the right questions."
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    PBL and Online Learning
Enoch Hale

Broadening Pedagogical Knowledge by Learning from Other Disciplines - Faculty Focus - 1 views

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    "The bulk of scholarship on teaching and learning continues to be embedded in our disciplines. It ends up there because that's where it counts (if it does) and because there's a long-standing and still fairly widely held belief that the teaching needed for a particular kind of content is unique. Unless you know the content, you can't know how to teach it."
Enoch Hale

Higher education for a hyper-connected world - University World News - 1 views

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    "In many respects the world has become a global knowledge society of interconnected and interdependent human activity that shares increasingly common ways to communicate and interact politically, economically and socially. Yet, at the same time, the world continues to be highly diverse in these areas as well as linguistically and culturally. "
Enoch Hale

New effort aims to standardize faculty-driven review of student work | InsideHigherEd - 0 views

  • Campbell also said that the project will be much more significant if it ultimately shows whether students' skills improve over time. "If you don't have some kind of comparison of change, showing what they could do when they came in and when they left," she said, "it may do exactly what the rankings do: reinforce the reality that great students produce great work, and great institutions have great students."
  • Arum said the AAC&U/SHEEO approach has the potential to be one of "multiple indicators" that higher education institutions and policy makers eventually embrace to understand student learning. "No one measure is going to be sufficient to capture student learning performance outcomes," he said. "Responsible parties know there's a place for multiple measures, multiple approaches."

    Campbell, of Teachers College, agrees that "because [student learning] is such a complicated issue, any one method is going to have complications and potential limitations"

  • The Results

    The faculty participants scored the thousands of samples of work (which all came from students who had completed at least 75 percent of their course work) in three key learning outcome areas: critical thinking, written communication and quantitative literacy. Like several other recent studies of student learning, including Academically Adrift, the results are not particularly heartening.

    A few examples:

    • Fewer than a third of student assignments from four-year institutions earned a score of three or four on the four-point rubric for the critical thinking skill of "using evidence to investigate a point of view or reach a conclusion."
    • Nearly four in 10 work samples from four-year colleges scored a zero or one on how well students "analyzed the influence of context and assumptions" to draw conclusions.
    • While nearly half of student work from two-year colleges earned a three or four on "content development" in written communication, only about a third scored that high on their use of sources and evidence.
    • Fewer than half of the work from four-year colleges and a third of student work from two-year colleges scored a three or four on making judgments and drawing "appropriate conclusions based on quantitative analysis of data."
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  • After her training in using the VALUE rubrics, Mullaney gathered nine faculty members on her campus to be the core of the two-year college's project group. They were previously unfamiliar with the rubrics, she says, but together they "went through them with a fine-toothed comb" and agreed "that these rubrics do represent an accurate way to assess these skills." The professors brought in their own (and their colleagues') assignments to see how well (or poorly) they aligned with the rubrics, Mullaney said. "Sometimes their assignments were missing things, but they could easily add them in and make them better."

    The last step of the process at the institutional level, she said, was gathering a representative sample of student work, so that it came from all of CCRI's four campuses and 18 different disciplines, and mirrored the gender, racial and ethnic demographics and age of the community college's student body. Similar efforts went on at the other 60-odd campuses.

  • "I might have thought so before, but through this process our faculty has really connected with the idea that this is about student learning," she said. "When they see areas of weakness, I think they'll say, 'Wow, OK, how can we address this? What kinds of teaching strategies can we use?'"
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    Assessment: What are students really learning?
Enoch Hale

The Dark Side of Music - Pacific Standard - 3 views

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    Interesting. My first thought: if music can throw off one's moral compass, what does that mean for listening to music while driving.
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