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Ashley W.

Word aversion: Hate moist? Slacks? Crevice? Why do people hate words? - Slate Magazine - 39 views

  • sexual connotations that are among the words that elicit this kind of reaction—moist being an obvious one,” he says. “But there are other words like luggage, and pugilist, and hardscrabble, and goose pimple, and squab, and so on, which I guess you could imagine phonic associations between those words and something sexual, but it certainly doesn’t seem obvious.”
    • Casey Doyle
       
      I feel like some gross words not only have sexual connotations, but also are gross sounding to the ear. For example, two words that I hate are crotch and groin (funny how similar they are!). They both are just awful to say, and seem to get stuck in your throat as you try to choke it out. But, they also have gross connotations! I wonder if they were named with a gross sound because they represent a gross meaning!
    • Taylor Brayce
       
      I feel that the word that i dislike the most would have to be "B*tch" i just feel like there is so much hate that is put behind the word when said, even when said with a nice tone. There is always the slight tinge of hate put in there. I really enjoy the word " rendezvous" , it nicely flows off the tongue. When i say it, it makes me happy just by the sound. I have noticed that French and Latin words seem to intrigue me the most.
    • Jamie s
       
      This is so true. I think that people just have sick minds and they take so many things in dirty ways. I dont understand why. I can say something simple and normal but they change it into something sexual.
    • Anna Dunham
       
      Many people hate or dislike certain words for certain reasons, for some reason it might be connected by the context of the first time we heard that word. Many people don't like the word moist, but I do because it reminds my of the cookies that I saw in the move Cinderella Story, where the mother described them as moist. Maybe because others have not heard this word in such a great context as fresh baked cookies creates it to be unpleasant for them when they hear a certain word.
    • Jasmine Baginski
       
      I think that prior knowledge and meanings of certain words definitely affect how we perceive words such as "moist" and other words that can also be determined as sexual. Even words that seem to have no connection to sexual meanings can be made sexual with the context in that they are used. People are just weird like that.
    • Briana Grenert
       
      I really like the word lackadaisical because it flows well, it is interesting and quirky. It is a word that looks like and feels like it means the exact opposite of what it does (Lacking enthusiasm and determination). It's a word tha I can't hold in my mind because it doesn't feel right, and I think that there's something beautiful about that. Of course, that's just me rationalizing (the same reasoning does not hold true for the word pulchritudinous, you see)
  • pimple
    • Briana Grenert
       
      Anatoly Liberman has a very interesting illustration of sound symbolism with the world pimple. In fact, I'd recommend reading that book if you're interested in why some words elicit a visceral reaction. 
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    • Zoe Cook
       
      I think it is really hard for us to separate words from their meanings and I think that, even unintentionally, we will always have some aversion to words whose meaning we dislike or find "gross". I think it would be really interesting to see a study in which the participants did not speak the target language and then judged how attractive sounding the words were. I think the results would be at least somewhat different than those studies done about English words with English speakers, who cannot fully disassociate the meaning from the word. On the other hand, maybe we give gross sounding names to gross things. Maybe our language reflects our preferences, instead of our preferences unfairly classifying our language.
  • “Afterwards she said she didn’t mind fu*k, but hated—wait for it—moist. Said it made her a little physically ill. Then I went on to Jackson, read there, and my sister Jane was in the audience—and had the same reaction. To moist.”
    • Cori Cummings
       
      I think the reason why so many people react so much to the word moist is because it's a visual word. The word f**k or any other bad word usually have that same vividly visual affect on people. 
  • “The word meal makes me wince. Doubly so when paired with hot.”
    • Cori Cummings
       
      When paired up with an adjective a the word meal can become a lot easier to visualize, thus creating an individual to crave this "meal". When we hear words we think of an image to fit with what the other person is telling us. For example, "hot meal" we visualize a nice warm meal, which is very comforting and may cause us to 'wince' because we long for that comfort of this type of meal.
  • “The [words] evoke nausea and disgust rather than, say, annoyance or moral outrage. And the disgust response is triggered because the word evokes a highly specific and somewhat unusual association with imagery or a scenario that people would typically find disgusting—but don’t typically associate with the word.”
    • Ashley W.
       
      I agree with the idea that people tend to associate their preferences with the meaning of words. More info is found on my wordpress: http://awong014.wordpress.com/2013/04/05/word-aversion/
  •  
    This is an intriguing article about word aversion - and really links Sense Perception with Language as a WOK. I'd like you all to read it and offer a comment or excerpt with comment. Perhaps you found a particular quote or idea thought-provoking, or you can offer a good question. What words to you feel an aversion to? How do you know?
  • ...21 more comments...
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    Moist is definiately one of the worst words that we have. I find it interesting that we generally find that monosyllable words more detesting than longer multisyllable words. However, I do not think sword is a bad word. Maybe I think this because I cannot disconnect the meaning of the word. To me, a sword represents nobility, honor, and courage, all of which are positive.
  •  
    It is very interesting how people dislike certain words just by the way they sound. I know I do it a lot where I will avoid using it or kind of cringe when people say it especially the word moist. I also feel the word moist is highly disliked because of the meaning as well for example when one is walking outside and it lightly starts to rain their clothing could be describes as moist which is a horrible feeling.
  •  
    This is a topic that I've actually talked about with my sister several times and I always laugh at how she freaks out in response to certain words. I don't really get bothered by much but she absolutely hates the words moist and puss not for their definitions but for the way that they sound. I can't think of any right now on the spot but I feel like typically the words that make me cringe are repulsive due to their definition rather than sound. I don't really like words that end in -shy like mushy or gushy because they just sound gross to me.
  •  
    The article suggests that there are some words that we dislike only because of what they sound like. But can we completely take away the meaning of the word without being influenced by it? It seems unlikely. We consciously or unconsciously connect a sequence of sounds to some image in our head. Even the article itself suggests that we dont like the word 'moist' because we associate it to a sexual situation. Maybe, then, we could ask a foreign person what she thinks of the word 'moist' without knowing its meaning? But still, she could relate it to another sequence of sounds that means something else in her language. We are biased by what we know already. There's nothing wrong with it; but we are.
  •  
    Whoa Whoa whoa, whats with all the hate for the word moist. I really don't understand why we hate certain words. I guess i get their reasoning for what the words mean and what they define, but it still weird. Why do we not like words? its completely counter productive for a species to hate the expansion of their own language. well anyways that was my rant. If you haven't guessed by now i dont really have any affiliations with any words, except moist. I like the word moist.
  •  
    In this article it discusses the effect that some words have on people and the distaste that they have. It discusses how some words when said by people make them feel uncomfortable. In the article it discusses how the word moist has a negative affects on people because it feels weird to say and has an uncomfortable sound. For me personally, I don't personally get too grossed out by words very often but there are certain ones that do make me cringe. Some of these words include ooze and slush. I positively can't stand those words. For me I personally find it really interesting how certain words affect certain people. My question that I have is whether or not we could train ourselves to cringe to certain words or be okay with certain words? Also I want to know whether certain words would have an affect on us in the same gross way even if we did not know the definition of them.
  •  
    It seems to me that many of these words do have meanings we associate with them that make them so repulsive. The article suggests that a lot of these words, "moist" included, have sexual connotations. Phlegm, mucus, and pus are all words with gross meanings. Other words, though it may not be immediately obvious, might have similar sounds to words with gross or sexual meanings, or we might associate them with some unpleasant experience in our past. This word aversion hypothesis should be tested on people who have never heard the word before/have no prior knowledge of its meaning. I think in Spanish the word "crotch" is actually onomatopoeia for a crunching sound so they probably do not have an aversion to the word.
  •  
    I think it is weird that we hate words by their sounds. I think that I personally tend to hate words because of their definition, or by the way I perceive it. Honestly when I hear the word moist, I don't hate it, I actually think of moist brownies, which are yummy!! Of course its just my opinion, but i think my point I am trying to get out of here is that I don't think people just hate words because of their sounds, there are also other factors like past experiences/memories and past contexts in which the words were used in
  •  
    In the article, when he mentioned that people hate words because of their sight, it made me start thinking about words that I don't like to see when reading. I realized that one thing I dislike the look of in a word is when there are multiple tittles (the dots above Is and Js) in a row. It looks very foreign and unnatural to me. For example, "jiggle". But, the multiple tittles isn't "jiggle"'s biggest problem.
  •  
    I agree with "The [words] evoke nausea and disgust rather than, say, annoyance or moral outrage. And the disgust response is triggered because the word evokes a highly specific and somewhat unusual association with imagery or a scenario that people would typically find disgusting-but don't typically associate with the word." There are many words that just look bad. Porcupine would be one of these words that just look bad.
  •  
    This article discusses the effect that some words have on people and the distaste that they have towards these certain words. Subconsciously, we as individuals are constantly visualizing images while we have conversations and with each word automatically popping and image into our heads. Some words have negative images connected with them, and as a result could cause one to feel distaste or evoke nausea. For example, the word "vomit" is harsh sounding and automatically puts the image of barf into our minds. Some words when typed seem to look unappealing because of how the letters look together. For example the word "Phlegm" uses letters that just look bad together. As a result, the word phlegm is looked at as unappealing and creepy. There are also negative connotations linked to the word phlegm because of the automatic mental images your mind conjures up.
  •  
    "Early in the story, there is a brief passage in which the narrator, describing a moment of postcoital amorousness, says, "Everything seemed moist, permeable, sayable."" I really am in a predicament with this article. I agree and disagree at the same time. I can imagine how we dislike a word, but hating a word is a whole different meaning. When you hate a word, to me, you hate the meaning and definition behind it. When you dislike a word, it seems more so that you dislike the sound of the word and the sayablility of the word. So I dont think its right to hate on the word, for you are hating on the definition behind it. So i feel we should use a less INTENSE word like hate to criticize the sayability of the word. "Being grossed out by the word moist is not beyond comprehension. It's squishy-seeming, and, to some, specifically evocative of genital regions and undergarments." This passage mentions its mainly the SOUND, not the word or definition itself, Which brings clarity to the article.
  •  
    I disagree with the premise of this article, which appears to be that some sounds are inherently distasteful. They're distasteful because they remind us of other words. As someone enrolled in french I don't hate certain words because they just sound wrong, I hate them because they're hard to say. My point being that the context of the word is what makes us shudder or cringe. The context for this cringe may not be so obvious. The example this article often cited was "moist", which stand alone the sound moy-st does not appear to be offensive. In a dirty or uncomfortable context it certainly creates an interesting reaction. As a whole I feel like this article is looking into something that isn't all there, but maybe I am just not personally afflicted with 'word aversion'.
  •  
    i don't really agree with this article, i don't hate or love any words based just on the way they sound. i like or dislike words based on the meaning. words with sexual connotations we think sound gross but is that because we know the meaning of the word or because the word its self sounds bad. we could just be rating words on how they sound based on their meaning. but one word i do hate more than anything though is Prius something about it gets on my nerves
  •  
    The premise of this article was a discussion on the idea of word aversion. "Word aversion is marked by strong reactions triggered by the sound, sight, and sometimes even the thought of certain words." This quote was quite thought provoking as it made me really wonder - what is it that makes a word unpleasant? Is it in fact the sound of the word (how it sounds when it it said), the sight of the word (its formation, how the letters look together), the thought of a certain word (the possibly unpleasant images that it brings to mind), or in fact even a combination? My belief is that in most cases, word aversions can be blamed on the human subconscious and the way in which, whether we like it or not, words are connected to certain images. When reviewing many common word aversions, i really couldn't help but notice that the most common ones are usually those to do with bottily fluids such as mucus, pimple, ooze, scab, pus, phlegm and even moist. This is a point also mentioned within the article.- "Many hated words refer to "slimy things, or gross things, or names for garments worn in potentially sexual areas." This would explain why certain word aversions create feelings of disgust, because when the word is heard, it can subconsciously provoke unpleasant images and experiences connected to that word.
  •  
    I personally dont dislike the word moist. People find words gross because of two things and that if it has a bad connotation to it and that makes us connect it to a bad or a gross words either intentionally or subconsciously. The other reason that i think people think some words are nice and others are bad because of the way it sounds. For example words that roll off the toungue easily will ussualy sound niceer than odd sounding words and when there is a mixture of this leaning towards a bad side or a good side that word will come off as such.
  •  
    In our society, not only as a national society, but as an international one, words are powerful. Our education systems thrive on words, whether it be the obligatory second language all students are now required to take, or punishment of the improper use of deemed "inappropriate" words, they are none the less, powerful. Some words are titled as beautiful, for me, some of these pretty words are amour, effervescent, enticing, arrivederci, and capricious, however, the list goes on. Now lets take a moment to find some commonalities of these words. All but one of the words begin with a vowel, meaning that the first sound has a softer pronunciation. Two of the five words are from the French and Italian vocabulary. And all of them are two or more syllables. They seem to roll off of the tongue effortlessly. Moist. One of most unappreciated and unliked words in the English dictionary begins with a consonant, is a single syllable, and has a hard ending. So it is possible that the construction of a word, which directly affects the sound of it, plays a huge role on how we categorize pretty and ugly words.
  •  
    With words that have sexual connotations you never really know what is going on with the word. You really don't think of the word very much (at least for me) you picture it instead. But for pretty words you also picture them so maybe it isn't about the meaning about the word, it is more about the soundings of the words, the harsh sounds or "fuck" and "crotch" and the smooth sounds of "blue" and "leaves" give you a picture. But when it comes to inappropriate words the harsh sounds really turn off the listener.
  •  
    I think that people dislike words because of the definition and the connotations that they get from hearing it. Not from the sound that they make when we say it out loud. For me, it was kind of difficult to come up with words that i like and dislike because of their meanings. So what i am trying to say is that the words sound is not the only thing that can make us like or dislike it; but it depends on our experiences and the definition of the word itself.
  •  
    The reason I think that people dislike words is because they usually have an image correlation in their head that they don't particularly like, or because they have a experience that has given a bad connotation to a word this. This correlation people have with words can be intentionally or subconsciously. Because of this people usually choose words that they like or dislike not based on the sound of it but from the image and experience correlation coming from the definition of that word and their experience with it. that is why i don't really agree with this article, i don't hate or love any words based just on the way they sound.
  •  
    I personal don't usually get offended by "harsh" or mean words. I feel that people dislike them because of the definition that they are given or an image that goes with the word. Also the sound of the words can be a reason too, some bad words are really bad sounding and are not good to hear. There are many words that i like and most of them are because of the meaning that they have, and there are some words that i just like to day because it is fun too or sounds cool to me.
  •  
    Some words just sound disgusting, and that's why some people hate them. Other words just have meanings that are too strong for common communication. Words that people find nice are ones that flow off the tongue naturally and sound good.
  •  
    I'm not bothered by a lot of these words as much as some people. But maybe that's because I love to say words like "moist" and "fluid" just to watch people cringe >:D But I do understand why people might be disgusted by certain words. Some, like flegm (I hate this one) sound slimy and squishy. Others, like "bitch" and "cunt" sound sharp and stinging, and they attack the listener.
Amy Burvall

'We will all share more and more: it's unstoppable" - 1 views

  •  
    LJ Rich explains the growing phenomenon of lifelogging and the implications it has for us all. PLEASE WATCH AND COMMENT IF YOU LIKE..THERE ARE A LOT OF KNOWLEDGE ISSUES EMBEDDED INTO THIS. What k.i. questions can YOU think of?
  •  
    I was intrigued by this quote: "the problem isn't technology...it grows on its own..it's it's own beast...the problem is probably our attitude"
Kristen Takenaka

Stop Stealing Dreams (the entire manifesto on the web), cleaned up HTML version - Stop ... - 89 views

  • Feel free to read
    • Amy Burvall
       
      We will be reading this and highlighting and annotating with your thoughts. It will help you process the Cheating Scandal presentations as well as prepare you for the upcoming project on Rethinking Education. Please think about issue of knowledge and learning, as Mr. Godin asks the big question: What is School For?
  • Dreams
  • Dreams
    • Haelee Tallett
       
      It was extremely interesting how schools kind of manipulate children to become certain things other than letting children becoming their own person and able to express their creativity and personality.
  • ...208 more annotations...
  • It wasn’t until 1918 that nationwide compulsory education was in place.
    • Jacob Steiner
       
      It's shocking that education (semi) as we know it was established less than 100 years ago. Just a century ago, children took their first steps and went straight to work in the factories.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      It's so close to us !!! It's incredible how fast we're evolving, and yet we have so many points to improve - like child labor all around the world.
    • mary mattingly
       
      i had no idea how much the system has developed since then!
    • Haelee Tallett
       
      It's crazy how only a hundred years ago education was established and how rapidly things are changing.
  • Large-scale education was not developed to motivate kids or to create scholars. It was invented to churn out adults who worked well within the system. Scale was more important than quality, just as it was for most industrialists.
    • Jacob Steiner
       
      It's really interesting that school was not creating for the students' benefits, but to mold these growing children into what they want. I've never thought about the concept of school like this.
    • Casey Doyle
       
      This is sounding like 1984 : its all about training us to obey! It doesn't matter what we're learning to do ,as long as we're learning to do it how we're told to.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Ok, but is there a way we can make it better ? It would be easy to stop going to school and not have all the negative part, but where would we get all the good stuff ?
    • Daniel Leong
       
      Like what I posted in Terrill's, we NEED a wider variety of classes so that we can find a passion. THAT is how we can make school better. Ex: Astronomy, Business, Engineering, Fashion, etc.
    • Daniel Leong
       
      Also, we need more field trips and hands-on experience
  • It’s often difficult to see that when you’re in the middle of it.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      It's so true for so many things !
    • Carly Pate
       
      In school kids don't seem to want to change things and stretch out into their own person because they have been trained to do the opposite, like stay in lines, and stay seated and be quiet. When a student is in the middle of the school system, and used to it, they will not stretch past the boundaries they have knows and grown up with.
  • here is some money
    • Zachary
       
      I think that money is a major problem of public and private schools...BUT if administrators were paid less or completely eliminated from schools. Maybe teachers should just elect other teachers as Principal and Vice prinispal.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Should they be paid more than regular teachers then ?
    • Claire Godenzi
       
      Administrators play a very important role in schools and i feel that eliminating them just to give more money to the teachers would prove more harm than good. On this note, teachers have so much on their plate as it is with grading, planning, and all their other responsibilities, i feel that adding the duties that come with being principle/VP would overload the teachers and eventually become too much for some. Teachers should stick to teaching, administrators to administrating. That's just my view, but i also see where you are coming from Zach, and it is a noteworthy opinion
    • Edward de Vries
       
      I agree that the leader of the school systems need to be elected, and should be more qualified than the normal teachers.
    • Haelee Tallett
       
      I feel that teachers should get a decent amount of money because they are the ones who shape children into success.
  • Our current system of teaching kids to sit in straight rows and obey instructions isn’t a coincidence—it was an investment in our economic future
    • katifarr
       
      I still think kids are an investment in our economic future. If the future isn't educated they can't improve society like every generation has managed to do. You give your children an education and you expect some sort of return on that down payment of sorts. But thankfully a good investment isn't a docile and obedient generation anymore.  
    • mary mattingly
       
      I think that we should rethink this work ethic to be honest, yes it may enforce discipline, but is this really going to be like the "real world"?
  • Is there any question that the first kind of job is worth keeping in our economy?
    • katifarr
       
      Doesn't someone need to do it? Or is technology advanced enough to do it without us? If not how are we supposed to get people to work in factories, because I don't want to and I don't know who would 
  • The method doesn’t matter to me, the outcome does
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Mmm, I don't know... I actually believe the opposite : it's not what you do but the way you do it that counts.
    • Ariana A.
       
      I agree with Iona but at the same time I feel as though what you do does count too. Just not as much as the way you do it...
    • Carly Pate
       
      Both matter. Method is the entire structure and base of the outcome. Its like a painting. There needs to be a method and structure under the beautiful outcome.
  • And yet our schools are churning out kids who are stuck looking for jobs where the boss tells them exactly what to do.
    • Casey Doyle
       
      It's crazy that they tell us that we're going to school so that we can get jobs. We think that we are being trained to have unique skills to do jobs and become irreplaceable workers, but it's really the opposite!
    • mary mattingly
       
      never thought of it like that casey!
    • Jamie s
       
      We learn things that we might not even use for our job or in the real world. In class I get so frustrated over that. Why do we learn things that we dont even use when we grow up?
  • School isn’t nearly as good at this as television is.
    • katifarr
       
      And now that television is becoming increasingly less popular we're probably much less culturally coordinated. Also the internet allows a lot of room for cultivating special interests 
  • we see ever more belief in unfounded theories
    • Zoe Cook
       
      Does he have any proof for this? I find it hard to believe that compulsory education INCREASES our belief in the irrational, especially as scientific study grows in depth and spread as time passes.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Or maybe going more in depth with the scientific studies make people want to step aside and believe there is something else that is less concrete and calculated.
  • It’s worth highlighting
  • The school is supposed to be an underfunded processing facility, barely functioning, with bad behavior, questionable security and most of all, very little learning.
    • danniblack
       
      Our mind has been comprised. We have been trained by movies to think that a normal school is "underfunded processing facility, barely functioning, with bad behavior, questionable security and most of all, very little learning." If we are supposed to "believe" in high school than why do they want us to look at high schools the way we do? 
  • As soon as we associate reading a book with taking a test, we’ve missed the point.
    • Casey Doyle
       
      I feel like school is turning everything that supposed tobe fun into work -- even art for me now is starting to turn into work!
    • Katie Dalgamouni
       
      I agree....I always prefer reading books in English that I normally wouldn't pick up on my own or else it gets ruined for me.
  • What’s the right price to pay for this car?
    • Kelly K
       
      I think that we should courses that will help us prepare for the responsiblities of being an adult. I think that in high school we should learn how to write checks, how to pay taxes, how to purchase houses and cars and how to set up retierment plans, to buy and sell stocks ect.
    • Kelly K
       
      I think that we should courses that will help us prepare for the responsiblities of being an adult. I think that in high school we should learn how to write checks, how to pay taxes, how to purchase houses and cars and how to set up retierment plans, to buy and sell stocks ect.
  • While the internet has allowed many of these changes to happen
    • Terrill Rohr
       
      the internet seems to be the base for everything.
    • David Awesome Cote
       
      even the base for my dreams? i think my wants arent confined to you and your internet terrill.
    • David Awesome Cote
       
      i dont need you and your expectations of the internet terrill. i think my wants are found elsewhere in addition to this idea of an over the world web
  • here are our expectations (very low)…
    • Terrill Rohr
       
      very low expectations set for these schools and they are expected not to thrive. why not invest a little money in them and give them a reason to thrive?
  • The few with passion. The few who care.
    • Terrill Rohr
       
      when students are given something they love they stick with it. where are all the students like that today?
    • Daniel Leong
       
      I think the problem is that schools do not offer as many classes as they can. For instance, how many schools have a robotics course? Or an Astronomy course? Schools are made to teach us the basics. However, they do not offer chances to find a career path, unless the path is in the basic areas. If people wanted to learn more about geology or astronomy or engineering, the have to wait until college or go out on their own. Schools need to offer a wider variety of courses to allow us to explore and to let us find something to stick with.
  • (take kids out of work so we can teach them to become better factory workers as adults
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Mmm... I really think school has evolved. It's basic to say the purpose is the same as a 100 years ago...
    • Ariana A.
       
      I completely agree with this comment. When you do something and you are not fully enthralled with it you tend to lose interest and drop it, but when you have something that you are passionate about you love doing it and you have the longing and drive to do more and excel and do the best you can at it.
    • Claire Godenzi
       
      I completely agree! When you don't have your heart in something, it is often hard to motivate yourself to stick with it. I can definitely relate to this comment
  • If school’s function is to create the workers we need to fuel our economy, we need to change school, because the workers we need have changed as well.
    • Ariana A.
       
      Haven't thought about this before but it makes a lot of sense....definitely sparked my mind for interesting thought processes!
  • The connection revolution is upon us
    • Ariana A.
       
      THis is a clever title. It is true thought with all the new forms of technology that are coming out it changes and creates new ways for us to connect with each other and gather information.
  • We don’t need more of what schools produce when they’re working as designed.
    • Casey Doyle
       
      Its so weird to think that school IS working... it needs to be completely reworked because its goal is not what is needed anymore.
  • mass production
    • Casey Doyle
       
      I feel like an inanimate product. This article makes me so frustrated because I'm already almost done with school and I know that it's too late to save me!
  • proof that his heart was ultimately in the right place, the man who industrialized the public schools he created left us with this admonition,

    …be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity.

    Unfortunately, that part of his curriculum is almost never taught in school.

    • Madeline St John
       
      I wish they taught this in school...people would be so much more proactive
    • Casey Doyle
       
      I like that he doesn't criticize the creator, and he shows that his heart was in the right place. It shows that at the time, school was appropriate, but it just doesn't make sense in modern times.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Yes, he stays pretty objective regarding the author, it's a good thing.
  • pointing out that it was an appropriate method to test only a tiny portion of what is actually taught and should be abandoned
  • would find their calling, then find a mentor, and then learn their craft
  • Jobs were invented before workers were invented
    • Edward de Vries
       
      There is always a need for something that doesn't exist yet
  • not enough
    • Katie Dalgamouni
       
      The more schools get, the more they will want to expand so who decides what is enough? Once they have more teachers and more money they will naturally want more.
  • students leaning forward in their seats, choosing to pay attention
    • Katie Dalgamouni
       
      Sounds like the teacher warned them about this visit because it's very rare to find an entire class "leaning forward in their seats, choosing to pay attention."
  • It’s difficult to generalize about a population this big, but household incomes are less than half of what they are just a mile away, unemployment is significantly higher
    • Cori Cummings
       
      I think most Americans have a negative stereotype towards people who live in Harlem because of the area's characteristics.
  • When we turn school into more than just a finishing school for a factory job, we enable a new generation to achieve things that we were ill-prepared for.
    • Cori Cummings
       
      This is very true. Most parents want this for their kids. They force their child to undergo their dreams, instead of their child following their own dreams. And that's why this generation hasn't really contributed in anything too revolutionary yet. Because they are put into a mindset where everyone succeeds and becomes successful in the same way. Graduating highschool and then graduating college. After that you get a good job, get married and buy a house. If all kids weren't subjected to this type of mindset maybe a child would create something new, something different for our generation.
  • And when we give students the desire to make things, even choices, we create a world filled with makers.
  • When we teach a child to love to learn, the amount of learning will become limitless.
  • the only good reason to teach trig and calculus in high school is to encourage kids to become engineers and scientists.
    • Cori Cummings
       
      That's not a very good reason. Math should honestly stop by the time a student is in 8th grade, by then they should be able to realize weather they enjoy it enough where they would see themselves using it in a future job. If they do then they should take math in highschool, but if they don't it's a waste of time and students shouldn't be obliged to take it. If students must take a math class they should take a math class with material in it that they will actually need. CONSUMER MATH! Why do we barely touch on it when it's the thing we will be using so much when we are adults??
    • Kelly K
       
      I totally agree with you on this! We should decide if we want to contiune a career in math, we should also learn more about consumer math! This is the type of math that will be useful to us and is important to us! We keep learing about these silly math concepts like logs, quadratic functions, matrices ect... that we will never use when we are older, except if you want to be a math teacher or a career in math.
  • A primary output of school should be to produce citizens who often choose the rational path. And that’s going to happen only if we’ve created enough situations for them to practice in.
  • It’s a place where middle school football coaches have their players do push-ups until they faint, but math teachers are scolded for giving too much homework.
  • We’re all going down the drain
    • Kelly K
       
      I totally agree with this, our generation is slowly starting to loose our grammar and English (at least for Americans). I actually tested this out and went to youtube and looked at several popular videos and music videos and I saw at least 4 of the 15 or so comments that appeared on the video were text "slang" (like instead of writing you, it says U). I think cell phones have contributed to this also because when you text, you want to abbreviate and be able to send a quick short message.
  • How do we know that these schools are good
    • Kelly K
       
      This is really interesting. I never really thought of this until just now reading this. Why does everyone say that Harvard, Stanford and all these IVY league and private schools are sooooo goooood!?!? There are many schools around the country that offer the same courses and have the same schools (like pre med, pre law ect.) but what makes Stanford, Harvard and these other schools "so great?" Is it just because famous people have attended that school? What makes these IVY league and famous private schools so popular and have such a good reputation of being this really hard and good school?
    • Kelly K
       
      This is really interesting. I never really thought of this until just now reading this. Why does everyone say that Harvard, Stanford and all these IVY league and private schools are sooooo goooood!?!? There are many schools around the country that offer the same courses and have the same schools (like pre med, pre law ect.) but what makes Stanford, Harvard and these other schools "so great?" Is it just because famous people have attended that school? What makes these IVY league and famous private schools so popular and have such a good reputation of being this really hard and good school?
  • And the flip side of this fear and conformity must be that passion will be destroyed.
    • Zoe Cook
       
      This guy really, really hates conventional schooling. Amplify fear and destroy passion? Is school really that much of an Orwellian dystopia? 
  • 43. How not to teach someone to be a baseball fan
    • Zoe Cook
       
      So we should only be taught and seek information that we are passionate about? Or we should only find the "fun" information? It's easy to make the analogy while talking about baseball, but try to apply it to some actual school subjects. If kids only do what they're passionate about, we'll have a country full of adults, some of which can't multiply and some of which don't know the significance of 1776. 
  • learning is not done to you. Learning is something you choose to do
    • Amy Burvall
       
      what do you all think about this?
    • Iona Unguran
       
      I think that school is just one of the places where you get to learn. It might not be the most important one, but still, we shouldn't take it away. It would be just like closing a good book because it's not the answer to how the universe works.
    • Claire Godenzi
       
      I think that this statement is very true. Even a lesson from the greatest teacher in the world could not make you learn a single thing unless you CHOSE to take the information in and learn it. I fully agree with this quote in that you and only you ultimately have the power to motivate yourself to chose the knowledge you want to learn
    • Casey Doyle
       
      I think that this is true. A stubborn person isn't going to retain the information that you're shoving down their throat! I think that the concept of learning is when you actually hold on to and understand the information presented to you, and you can't force that upon anyone.
    • katifarr
       
      I totally agree with this. If I don't think something is useful or fun I totally tune it out. And if I'm adamantly opposed to learning something I have like a personal boycott by refusing to pay attention to it. I boycott things by daydreaming instead of doing the work, or doing the work wrong on purpose. I hardly ever do this. And when I do it's usually in math. But I haven't done this in years because math is usually like a fun puzzle.
    • Michael Brutsch
       
      I think we all do choose to learn because if we didn't secretly want to learn then we wouldn't be learning, but because we do want to learn even the slightest bit we do learn things in school. We choose to learn. If we didn't, we wouldn't learn.
    • Zachary
       
      I totally agree with this! Learning is what the leaner makes of it. The more effort you put in the more you get out of it. I think learning is a test for real life. Think about it the more you put in to life the more you get out of it. 
    • danniblack
       
      I agree with what is said here. I mean in reality we are really choosing to learn. We could easily sit in the back of the room and choose not to do anything or we could just not go to school at all because then we would be choosing not to learn. With all considered, choosing to learn is really up to all different kinds of situations. It comes down to money, time and whether or not if you want to actually learn at all.
    • Jamie s
       
      I agree with this. We go to school 5 times a week but that doesnt mean I learn everyday. It something you choose. You can choose to learn and take in the information. But you can choose not to pay attention and not learn what the teachers are teaching you
    • Haelee Tallett
       
      I think that this is very accurate because in order for someone to learn something; they need to want to and need to try.
    • Edward de Vries
       
      If a person doesn't like the subject they will get distracted and will not pay attention, leading them to fall behind
    • Kristen Takenaka
       
      I totally agree! You choose to learn, if you are willing to learn, you learn. Learning is not done to you.
    • Katie Dalgamouni
       
      I actually don't fully agree with this comment because in order to get a good grade in school, you have to pay attention to what is being taught so not learning in school isn't really an option. I suppose in hindsight you choose to study and get a good grade so I guess you choose whether or not you want to learn but you don't get to choose what to learn in school.
    • Terrill Rohr
       
      I agree with this statement because people have to choose to learn something. If you are unwilling to learn a new skill then you will never learn it, but if you sit down and you really want to learn then you will not only learn that new skill, but you will learn it faster and have fun doing it.
    • Jordan Gonzales
       
      I think that's completely accurate! If you don't WANT to learn something, you're not going to. That's the bottom line. It's like you put up a barrier so that nothing is absorbed. You might be able to recall the information, or whatever it is, for a test but you won't remember it or be able to use it late on.
  • Often overlooked in the rush to waste time at Facebook and YouTube is the fact that the Internet is the most efficient and powerful information delivery system ever developed.
  • We need students who can learn how to learn, who can discover how to push themselves and are generous enough and honest enough to engage with the outside world to make those dreams happen
  • Instead, our chaotic world is open to the work of passionate individuals, intent on carving their own paths.
  • That’s the new job of school. Not to hand a map to those willing to follow it, but to inculcate leadership and restlessness into a new generation.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      how can we do this better? Ideas, anyone?
    • katifarr
       
      I like having a map sometimes. Or at least some sort of guidelines. Not everyone can be just a big ball of fearlessness and ready to tackle any task that is put in front of them. Sometimes I would like someone to hold my hand and take me through the steps of something. I think being able to lead effectively is a useful skill, but some people are more comfortable or find more pleasure in doing what's put in front of them, and there shouldn't be anything wrong with that.
    • Zachary
       
      I don't know about this idea... Personally I think of myself as more old fashion. I think that I like lectures more than I like this self taught learning. To me if something works don't change it, don't fix what ain't broke. My grandpa used to say that all the time! I don't think the school system is broken, it just is for the people who care.
    • Madeline St John
       
      I think kids would be more passionate if they had more responsibility (less hand-holding) and if they were given access to all kinds of information (the internet) and given problems to solve--relevant, real-world problems that require thinking.
    • Nichole Bowen
       
      I think that speech classes should be a top priority for schools all over the country. If we want to create leaders, that is the way to do it. Many people have great ideas. The problem is that many people do not know how to get the ideas to the public. Afterall, an idea is hardly an idea if nothing comes out of it.
  • value is not created by increasing the productivity of those manufacturing a good or a service. Value is created by connecting buyers to sellers, producers to consumers, and the passionate to each other.
  • n the connected world, reputation is worth more than test scores. Access to data means that data isn’t the valuable part; the processing is what matters.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      Great knowledge issue stated here! It's not about the info/data...it's about how you access it, interpret it, critique or analyze it, evaluate it, and use it. Are we doing this enough in school?
    • Iona Unguran
       
      It would be hard to study analysis more in depth in school, because we would get influenced by the others, and I don't know how we would make it objective enough.
    • Zachary
       
      I think we do this a lot in school! We do this a lot on standerised tests! Which I think it is a pretty important thing to learn how to interpret graphs because you do that in the real word.
    • danniblack
       
      The answer to this is really a double edged sword. Sometimes we are evaluating and putting our knowledge to work too much. We might end up just doing busy work and it will not help us at all in the long run. While in some classes we barely use the knowledge we learn. We don't really interpret what we are given, we are just doing it to just get it over with.
      So all in all, I think we need to really do more of this in most of our classes but also take a away a little in other classes.
    • Katie Dalgamouni
       
      I think IB is all about this because we have to do more than just memorize information, we have to apply it to unknown situations as well as make connections to other subjects, units, or even things outside of school.
  • Group projects are the exception in school, but they should be the norm. Figuring out how to leverage the power of the group—whether it is students in the same room or a quick connection to a graphic designer across the sea in Wales—is at the heart of how we are productive today.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      At LJA do you think we do enough collaborative work? What are some major issues that arise with collaborative or "group" projects? Is this a good way to assess your learning?
    • Casey Doyle
       
      I hate group projects because it usually only assesses the knowledge of one or two people in the group. But I know that is it necessary because that's how the real world works. But I think there is a difference between collaboration and group projects - a collaborated work could still be assessed on every individuals contribution? I consider collaboration more where everyone contributes, but that's not always true for group projects.
    • Zoe Cook
       
      I personally don't like collaborative work because I think that, for the most part, it isn't collaborative or a decent assessment of what anyone in the group knows. I think that though teachers often assign groups to prevent people goofing off with their friends, if we were allowed to choose groups, we would work with people who we know well and are willing to split the work evenly with.
    • katifarr
       
      Not everything is collaborative. I like reading alone. I like doing studio work in art alone. I like writing alone. I like thinking alone. I really enjoy doing things alone, and it's really satisfying doing something completely independently. Sure, we should learn how to cooperate with people, but it's not a good way to assess your knowledge, but it's a good way to assess how well you can work with others.
    • Jacob Steiner
       
      The big problem with collaborative work is that there is rarely enough collaboration. The tasks are just split up without discussion, making it less work for everyone. Or, the other case, one member does everything while their group members just latch on and take some of the credit for the work produced. In my opinion, collaborative work is good when it works, but it often doesn't go the way everyone plans.
    • Michael Brutsch
       
      I think we do enough collaborative work. I think sometimes one person does all the work and everybody else gets credit. I don't think this is a very good way of assessing a single person's learning. It doesn't really work that well in my opinion.
    • Zachary
       
      I think it has to much, if school projects with others are done correctly there needs to be something that ensures everyone does a large amount of  work. I hate group projects because I end up doing all the work.
    • Devin
       
      I think in certain subjects like tok or environmental systems, we have enough collaborative work, but in classes like English and Biology we do not. I think group projects is not a good way to assess your learning but rather it teaches you how to deal with a group, and you cannon t assess this accurately unless you see everything that happens in the group which is not possible.
    • Jamie s
       
      I personally like "group projects" because I only see or think about stuff a certain way when others might have another perspective. I think that more than one head is better than one. I dont think it should be the norm because those free loaders wont participate. Some times you should do projects on your own because you cant always work in a group and you should learn to do stuff by yourself. At lja i think we have a good amount of collaborative group work. Group projects by yourself is a better way to assess your learning because the project is all YOUR work. Group projects is a little harder to assess your learning because ts a group so who knows if you actually worked on it.
    • Madeline St John
       
      We do a lot more group work at LJA than we did at any other school that I've been at...When you're working on group projects, it seems like its only beneficial when all the other group members are contributing, which doesn't happen all the time...but I guess in the "real world" this is what working in a job is like. There are always freeloaders and you have to get used to it...so even though it might affect your grade if the other people in your group are freeloading and not accurately represent your personal knowledge the point of the task shouldn't be to get a good grade. but to learn and collaborate and succeed
  • The bottom of the pyramid stores the students, with teachers (middle managers) following instructions from their bosses.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      How can we empower students (and teachers) more? Ideas?
    • Casey Doyle
       
      We should have the power of impeachment or vetoing or some democratic control over the administration of schools!
    • Zoe Cook
       
      Maybe more flexibility in the curriculum, or types of projects and assessments? If teachers are just taught what is being handed down to them, what they aren't interested in, it will undoubtedly have an impact on the amount they are able to interest the students.
    • Michael Brutsch
       
      We can't. There's a system in place for a reason. It keeps things less chaotic.
    • Zachary
       
      I really think to ensure that the administrators don't get in the way they should all be fired. I think that each school should elect a prinicipal and vice principal and they should be elected by the teachers. They should serve a one year term. This would really help get more money to the students and get rid of the the administration that gets in the way.
    • danniblack
       
      A way to empower people is to give them new and important experiences. With new experiences you learn and improve your skills. For example, in a store you have many things: how to work a register, stacking foods, and bagging. With all of these different tasks comes power. Therefore to empower students and/or teachers we need to give them skills and new experiences. 
    • Anna Dunham
       
      We can give the students more independent projects and things that we are passionate about and create responsibilities for the students in a way that they think that they are significant
  • Not what a patron would say to a talented artist, though.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      I like this analogy using the artist/patron. What if we treated all students as artists and teachers/schools acted as patrons or even "masters" in the Renaissance connotation of the word?
    • Zachary
       
      No I really don't like this idea. Like I said above I think you really shouldn't fix something that isn't broken. They only thing I would change about schools is firing the administrators. 
  • the only people who excel are those who have decided to do so. Great doctors or speakers or skiers or writers or musicians are great because somewhere along the way, they made the choice.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      what do you think about this statement?
    • Briana Grenert
       
      I think that people need to be motivated in all they do. If you're not motivated and passionate, you won't excel in that particular field. I don't think you're going to be a famous author if you don't want to be because they won't try. People can be rich by inheritance, but only who actually desire to go places can get there.  I guess you can be dragged along for the ride, but in my idealistic view that doesn't happen. 
    • Zoe Cook
       
      I think that there are many external factors that play into what a person will excel in: parents, teachers, natural ability, resources available, etc. A person can make a choice to try to excel and fail, or perhaps excel without really trying.
    • Casey Doyle
       
      I think it's true. And I think forcing the choice upon us is making even the committed ones hate it! Forcing yes would of course make everyone choose no - maybe we should try reverse psychology instead?
    • katifarr
       
      I feel like a lot of people who are successful are the people who work really hard. Not necessarily the smartest or most talented, but those with the most drive and ambition to be something more than average. I wouldn't call it a "choice" persay, more like a lifestyle or a personality trait.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Unconditionally true ! If you have the will to do it, you're the only one who can stop you.
    • Jacob Steiner
       
      I disagree with this statement. It goes back to the classic "Nature vs. Nurture" argument because some people just aren't gifted enough to have "smart genes" in their DNA. It's not completely up to each person whether they are smart or not. Granted, you do have to persevere and push yourself, but that is not the only criterion of being smart.
    • Michael Brutsch
       
      I think this is semi true. A majority of the people that are the greatest are the greatest because they chose to and worked towards that goal. Some people just can't though like disabled people and it may be impossible for them to do so. Aside from people where it may be impossible for them to be like the greatest speaker example because they are mute. But for everyone else. The greatest ones are the ones who made the choice to be great and to work towards this.
    • danniblack
       
      I do not full agree with this statement for a few reasons. 1) Sometimes people do not decided to excel in something, they just might have the skill. Like when you can sing, you are usually born with the voice to sing with; and your not just deciding that you can sing.
      2) I also think you have to look at in the other way too. Some people decide that they want to be really good at something but they can't. No matter what they do, they will never excel in what they want. This is because somethings you cannot teach; somethings just come to someone.
    • Ariana A.
       
      I think that for the most part this statement is completely true. People who believe and want to excel, and put forth the effort to do so will excel. If there is a person who merely just wants to excel yet does nothing to actually excel, well, then they won't. In order to achieve what you would like to achieve and improve where you want to improve, you have to put forth some effort and make the choice to do so.
  • As the industrial age peters out, as the growth fades away, the challenge is this: training creative, independent, and innovative artists is new to us. We can’t use the old tools, because resorting to obedience to teach passion just isn’t going to work.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      given that, how should we change? What would be some interesting new courses? What skills should we teach?
    • Briana Grenert
       
      I think that courses should be more focused on critical thinking skills....and maybe on making connections between disciplines. I think that many of the "traditional school" conventions should remain. 
    • Kelly K
       
      I think that we need some courses that will be helpful for everyone, like economics and maybe a consumer math class (about how to write checks, how you pay for a car, loans, 401 K's; retierment funds, ect....) Because when you become an adult, there are a lot of important responsibilities that come with it and you want to live stress free life and not have to worry about not being able to afford to buy a house, or pay taxes.
    • Jacob Steiner
       
      Passion isn't something you can teach. Passion has to be felt by each person individually. I don't believe we can teach a class, no matter how badly we want to, to students to become passionate about a certain subject.
    • Ariana A.
       
      I feel that in school we should definitely add some new classes or maybe just change the curriculum for certain ones. For example, I really like Cori's idea on adding consumer math to the curriculum because in truth, most of the things we learn in math 90% of us won't use after we graduate schooling. I think that and other skills that would aid us in later life should definitely be added into our curriculum somehow.
    • Allie Ball
       
      I feel like we as students should only learn the skills that will be needed for our future. For example: I want to teach history so why should I have to learn how to find an inverse function? If we let children explore the different careers to find what interests them we can better plan the courses they should take. This can also be a problem because as humans, we tend to change our minds.
    • Edward de Vries
       
      Our school should teach skills that are needed for the future. And have one month where every class is about a different program or skill and then after that month each student studies and learns one of the options. this is better than trying to get a student to be really good at something in a really short time period (design tech).
    • Anna Dunham
       
      I feel that we DEFINITELY need to learn or have courses on the way politics work, we need to non biass information to prepare us to vote and so we will actually be able to understand what the heck the rest of the world is talking about. I also think that we need a economics course, where they teach us how to finance, do taxes, ect.
  • The obligation of the new school is to teach reasonable doubt. Not the unreasonable doubt of the wild-eyed heckler, but the evidence-based doubt of the questioning scientist and the reason-based doubt of the skilled debater.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      this is a bit what TOK is trying to do...critical thinking
  • We can teach kids to engage in poetry, to write poetry, and to demand poetry—or we can take a shortcut and settle for push-pin, YouTube, and LOLcats.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      Hmmmm...create not merely consume
  • Can risk-taking be taught?
    • Amy Burvall
       
      When's the last time you took a big risk? What did you learn? Did someone teach you to take risks?
    • Iona Unguran
       
      I don't know if 'teaching' is the appropriate word. There's a certain combination of what the people around you say, what they do, what you see them doing, that makes you want to take a risk once in a while. No 'risk-takers' lessons.
    • Zoe Cook
       
      I think that risk-taking isn't something that is taught by teachers. I think that the type of parents we have or the type of peer group we have are what determines what types of risks we are willing to take.
    • Jacob Steiner
       
      I don't think that risk-taking can be taught because it's up to the personality of the person. It can be forced that the students take a risk, but schools can't demand that because it's taking a risk.
    • Briana Grenert
       
      I was in Japan. It was dark outside. I was in Machida, in the park across the street from the church where we were staying. We had been playing link tag with a group of Japanese girls, and everyone was heading back to the church. I was bringing up the rear of our group, and I saw two college age joggers sitting on the playground. "Konbanwa," I said. They laughed and responded "hello". I guess my accent gave me away. Later, I was standing outside of the church talking with some shy people. I saw the joggers jogging by. I said "hello" and they laughed, and somehow (I have no idea how) I started a conversation with them. I ended up bringing them into the church and they ended up eating with us and staying until 9:00. Before I brought them in, I didn't know these people. At all. I have no fear of people or strangers, but even I have to admit that that was a big risk. No one single person taught me to take risk--it was a combination of people at church, Pastor Frank, Annelise...a lot of leaders and students from church advocate for audacity. 
      From that experience I learned that pulling random people off the street is a good idea. 
    • danniblack
       
      I really do not think that risk-taking can be taught to someone. You are either born being an introvert or an extrovert. As an introvert you do not really want to take chances because you are shy. While an extrovert would be willing to take risks because they do not really care what people think of them; they put themselves out there, ready for anything.
    • Allie Ball
       
      I'm not much of a risk taker however I was raised to do so. My father raised me to believe that we must to risks to get what we truly want. I risk something, big or small, everyday. I'm taking a big risk now for a drama project. Everyday is a risk that must be taken.
    • Terrill Rohr
       
      To me, risk taking is not something that someone can teach you. Risk taking is something you do by nature. Risk taking is when you are willing to put your neck on the line and go out there and be different. The last time I took a big risk it ended really well for me. I learned that if you step out and help out other people, not only will they be rewarded but you will to. Not in a physical way, but sometimes in a mental way.
    • Jamie s
       
      Im not sure what. But for risk taking you learn you boundaries. You learn how far you can push yourself. And taking risks can lead to something amazing. Most famous scientists, artists, etc. took risks with their work.
  • Education isn’t a problem until it serves as a buffer from the world and a refuge from the risk of failure.
  • It would be a mistake to say that scientific education doesn’t work. It does work. It creates what we test.

    Unfortunately, the things we desperately need (and the things that make us happy) aren’t the same things that are easy to test.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      what do you think about this statement? What are some things we need and that make us happy that are virtually impossible to test?
    • Jacob Steiner
       
      I disagree with this statement partially because what makes you happy changes between people. The same thing that makes one person happy doesn't necessarily make someone else happy. What I'm trying to say is that scientific education can make people happy and that is completely testable.
  • The good jobs of the future aren’t going to involve working for giant companies on an assembly line. They all require individuals willing to chart their own path, whether or not they work for someone else.
  • The jobs of the future are in two categories: the downtrodden assemblers of cheap mass goods and the respected creators of the unexpected.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      Will you be a "respected creator of the unexpected"?
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Hopefully ! But it's always been this way, hasn't it ?
    • Briana Grenert
       
      I hope so.
  • few who figure out how to be linchpins and artists. People who are hired because they’re totally worth it, because they offer insight and creativity and innovation that just can’t be found easily.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      Seth's "linchpin" is someone who is indispensable due to the fact that despite whatever title they hold, they rise above the occasion and do more than expected, connect and inspire others, and offer creative solutions
  • n artist is someone who brings new thinking and generosity to his work, who does human work that changes another for the better.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      A bit like Google's 20% time - spend 20% of your work week working on a free-choice project that will make either the world or the company better
  • The only way out is going to be mapped by those able to dream.
  • The Internet is making the role of content gatekeeper unimportant. Redundant. Even wasteful.
  • What we do need is someone to persuade us that we want to learn those things, and someone to push us or encourage us or create a space where we want to learn to do them better.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      Thinking about thinking...how can teachers persuade you why you want to learn something, and then help you to be more self-directed?
    • Zoe Cook
       
      I don't think that there is an easy solution to make someone WANT to learn something if they don't have a natural inclination towards it besides the occasional "fun" activities which either aren't any fun or don't teach very much. The system we have now isn't by any means perfect, but we can't just say "we need someone to persuade us to want to learn" without giving any possible way how.
    • Nichole Bowen
       
      I recently found this article about keeping people's attention in class, and it actually relates very closely to this question. Enjoy!

      http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-keep-someones-attention-2012-8
    • Amy Burvall
       
      thanks Nichole!
    • Jordan Gonzales
       
      maybe if teachers had to persuade us, more students would have a better idea of what direction they want to go in life after school.
  • I wouldn’t want to live in an uneducated world. I truly believe that education makes humans great, elevates our culture and our economy, and creates the foundation for the engine that drives science which leads to our well being. I’m not criticizing education.

  • No. But I am wondering when we decided that the purpose of school was to cram as much data/trivia/fact into every student as we possibly could.
  • aggressively testing for trivia.
  • Computers changed that. Now the receptionist can’t lose your messages, because they go straight into voice mail. The assembly-line worker can’t drop a tool, because it’s attached to a numerically controlled machine. The telemarketer who interrupts your dinner is unlikely to over-promise, because the pitch is carefully outlined in script form on paper.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      interesting, right?
  • LEGO isn’t the problem, but it is a symptom of something seriously amiss. We’re entering a revolution of ideas while producing a generation that wants instructions instead.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      I agree. And at our house, we throw away all instructions and just make stuff with Legos- no fear of failure or "staying in the lines"
    • Alex Tatum
       
      I agree no matter what it is i NEVER read instructions.
  • Make something different
    • Amy Burvall
       
      love this!
    • Jamie s
       
      Being different is good! Dont follow the crowd. Be unique.
  • Jeremy Gleick, a sophomore at UCLA, has devoted precisely an hour a day to learning something new and unassigned.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      why don't we all try this- even for 1 month!
    • Jamie s
       
      That's really interesting and very detected. You can learn so much more and be more knowledgeable.
  • Available resources and instruction have gone from scarce to abundant in less than a decade, and the only barrier to learning for most young adults in the developed world is now merely the decision to learn.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      Please take advantage of this!
  • Think of the art we haven’t seen, the jobs that haven’t been created, and the productivity that hasn’t been imagined because generations have been persuaded not to dream big.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      whoa. sad 
  • creative jobs lead to more creative jobs. Self-starting, self-reliant, initiative-taking individuals often start new projects that need new workers
    • Amy Burvall
       
      interesting point
  • short and brutish
    • Amy Burvall
       
      love the Hobbes reference.
  • These students are trained to dream small dreams.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      do you agree with this?
    • Allie Ball
       
      Yes. We are told to dream big, but then we constantly have our dreams challenged. We are told to never say "I can't do it," but they say we shouldn't. Dreams are dreams. I think the older we get, the more we forget about the dreams we had when we were little. The silly dreams that we really believed in, with all our hearts. The common mindset is "the older we get, the more serious we become. The smaller our dreams get."
    • Jamie s
       
      Semi. Teachers sometimes shut down your dreams or adults shut down your dreams because they say it is unrealistic. So your dreams become smaller more realistic dreams
    • leah qiu
       
      I don't believe what you dream can be trained. Dreams are the only thing we can keep personal anymore and can be but are not always affect by others.
    • Edward de Vries
       
      most students have small aspirations while those who dream big and can achieve are the ones who will be successful.
    • Terrill Rohr
       
      Students may be trained to "dream small dreams," but we are capable of doing anything we desire. If we want to dream big dreams then we can. Dreaming big is what keeps some people going. It helps them see that light at the end of the tunnel and that there is something that they can reach for. It's a goal that they can set. By dreaming small dreams you are setting yourself back, your holding yourself back from achieving greater things. I agree with this post, but I also think it's wrong.
  • Dreamers don’t have special genes. They find circumstances that amplify their dreams
  • As knowledge becomes networked, the smartest person in the room isn’t the person standing at the front lecturing us, and isn’t the collective wisdom of those in the room. The smartest person in the room is the room itself: the network that joins the people and ideas in the room, and connects to those outside of it
    • Amy Burvall
       
      poignant...what do you think?
  • knowledge is becoming inextricable from—literally unthinkable without—the network that enables it
    • Amy Burvall
       
      great Knowledge Issue..is knowledge changing due to connectivity and data overload?
  • notion that each of us can assemble a network (of people, of data sources, of experiences) that will make us either smart or stupid
    • Amy Burvall
       
      Who is your network is making you smarter? less intelligent?
  • only way for a student to get respect inside the system of school is to earn temporary approval from a teacher he won’t likely see again any time soon
    • Amy Burvall
       
      have you ever felt like this?
    • katifarr
       
      Not really. Because I go to a small school with teachers who genuinely seem to care about the students, I don't feel like I need to strategically win anyone over. The relationships forged with teachers at this school are legitimately enjoyable ones. Although when I went to Kahuku which was a much, much larger school I didn't really care for the teachers because they didn't really seem to be able to differentiate me from anyone else. Although I didn't feel any pressure to earn their approval. They were just doing their job and I was doing mine.
    • Kristen Takenaka
       
      I have felt like this. When you see a teacher once a week, for example, it is easier to please or get some sort of approval because you don't really know the teacher and the teacher doesn't know the student.
  • yet a cable TV–inoculated audience wants everything dumbed down to the Kardashian level.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      what do you think about this?
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Sad but true... I myself spent the afternoon watching people on TV who made me feel so much smarter.
  • If we spend more time training inquisitive humans, we’ll have to give up on the basics, and that will mean nothing but uneducated dolts who don’t even know who Torquemada was.”

    • Amy Burvall
       
      Counterargument: when we sacrifice content to focus on meta (thinking about thinking), what happens? And will it matter?
  • I’m concerned about fact ignorance and history ignorance and vocabulary ignorance.

    I’m petrified, though, about attitude ignorance.

  • If we teach our students to be passionate, ethical, and inquisitive, I’m confident that the facts will follow.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      do you think he is on the right track...or not?
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Most of the time, yes. But if we really want to improve that, the true answer is how far the student himself is willing to go.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      any thoughts?
    • Allie Ball
       
      I believe yes. We need to be passionate and curious. If we are, then we search for the facts ourselves.
  • Users type “Google” into Bing to get to Google so they can do a search (the very search they could have done in Bing, of course).

    And then, when they get to Google, one of the most popular terms? Facebook.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      this anecdote cracks me up all the time!
  • They self-describe as Dummies and give up, not for lack of genetic smarts, but for lack of initiative and because of an abundance of fear.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      I find this happens a lot- especially with people dealing with technology..instead of trouble-shooting, people give up and personalize it
  • The bad decisions we see every day aren’t the result of lack of data, or lack of access to data.

  • No, they’re the result of a schooling culture that is creating exactly what it set out to create.

    Along the way, we teach students to be open to and trusting of marketing messages

    • Amy Burvall
       
      This is the essence of TOK- to get you to question knowledge claims and examine perspectives
  • The way we save the written word, intellectual discourse, and reason is by training kids to care.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      and how do we do that? Is his theory valid?
  • should sell students on why.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      should every course start out with a unit on "Why should we study this?"
    • Ariana A.
       
      YES I do. Every year in basically every class there is also at least one student who asks the teacher, "Why do we have to learn about this? How will this help us in life?" It is because of this that I think units should start out with a brief description of why the students are learning about that particular thing in school. Knowing that we will later use it in life makes us want to pay attention that much more.
  • matters is that motivation is the only way to generate real learning, actual creativity, and the bias for action that is necessary for success.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      so if motivation is the key, should students only learn what they are passionate about? How do we open ourselves up to new passions?
  • contact lenses hooked up to the Internet.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      I want these!
  • skill of memorizing a fact for twelve hours (and then forgetting it) is not only useless, it’s insane.
  • synthesize complex ideas and to invent new concepts is far more useful than drill and practice
    • Amy Burvall
       
      love this....so what would that look like, for example, in one of your courses?
  • What we can’t do, though, is digitize passion. We can’t force the student to want to poke around and discover new insights online.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      good point
  • Find the best homework questions ever devised and create world-class tutorials in how to solve each one
    • Amy Burvall
       
      I think students should do this
  • When we free access to information from the classroom setting, the leverage of the great teacher goes way up
  • Mostly I’ve tried to point out to people that the very things we assumed to be baseline truths were in fact fairly recent inventions and unlikely to last much longer.
    • Justin Merck-Rocha
       
      Not only is this with the internet, but also with television
  • I’m arguing that the connection revolution sets the table for a return of emotional labor. For the first time in a century, we have the opportunity to let digital systems do work while our teachers do labor.
  • Isn’t it interesting that the movies we love about sports always feature the dark horse who dreams, the underdog who comes off the bench and saves the day?
  • In Hansen’s estimation, it’s easy for natural gifts to escape the notice of people who aren’t focused on finding them and amplifying them.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      does any one of you feel this has happened to you?
  • raise a generation of math hackers, literature hackers, music hackers and life hackers?

    • Amy Burvall
       
      interesting thought- create hackers for everything
  • Leadership isn’t something that people hand to you. You don’t do followership for years and then someone anoints you and says, “here.” In fact, it’s a gradual process, one where you take responsibility years before you are given authority.

  • the only thing holding us back is the status quo (and our belief in the permanence of status).
  • School serves a real function when it activates a passion for lifelong learning
  • Your work is worth more than mere congruence to an answer key
  • Fitting in is a short-term strategy, standing out pays off in the long run

  • Will the next generation know more facts than we do, or will it be equipped to connect with data, and turn that data into information and leadership and progress?
    • Amy Burvall
       
      knowledge issue question
  • School is at its best when it gives students the expectation that they will not only dream big, but dream dreams that they can work on every day until they accomplish them—not because they were chosen by a black-box process, but because they worked hard enough to reach them.
  • The challenge is that the connected economy demands people who won’t hide, and it punishes everyone else. Standing out and standing for something are the attributes of a leader, and initiative is now the only posture that generates results.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      think about this please..
  • If the dream is huge, we get applause from our peers and our teachers, but are able to hide out because, of course, the dream is never going to come true
    • Amy Burvall
       
      so...we should dream big but realistically?
  • We need more brave artists, too, and some poets. We need leaders and people passionate enough about their cause to speak up and go through discomfort to accomplish something. Can these skills be taught or amplified?
    • Amy Burvall
       
      can they?
  • reading and writing remain the two skills that are most likely to pay off with exponential results.
  • When we associate reading with homework and tests, is it any wonder we avoid it?

  • The effective writer in the connected revolution can see her ideas spread to a hundred or a million people. Writing (whether in public, now that everyone has a platform, or in private, within organizations) is the tool we use to spread ideas.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      think of every piece of writing you do as if was to be published to the entire world on the Internet
  • Katherine did what so many kids are capable of doing, but aren’t expected to do.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      do what is unexpected of you
  • how to figure things out and make them happen
    • Amy Burvall
       
      be a do-er not a dawdler....
  • Because we can see whom you know and what they think of you, because we can see how you’ve used the leverage the Internet has given you, because we can see if you actually are able to lead and actually are able to solve interesting problems—because of all these things, college means something new now.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      what does college mean now?
  • The definition of “best” is under siege.
  • The more applicants they reject, the higher they rank in U.S. News and other rankings. And thus the rush to game the rankings continues, which is a sign that the marketers in question (the colleges) are getting desperate for more than their fair share. Why bother making your education more useful if you can more easily make it appear to be more useful?
    • Amy Burvall
       
      University marketing system- exposed!
  • we’re about to see significant cracks in old-school schools with mass-market degrees.
  • Back before the digital revolution, access to information was an issue. The size of the library mattered. One reason to go to college was to get access. Today, that access is worth a lot less. The valuable things people take away from college are interactions with great minds (usually professors who actually teach and actually care) and non-class activities that shape them as people.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      great point - status of libraries once extremely important..now, not so much...so how does our perception of these universities change? What can they do for you?
  • Things like gap years, research internships, and entrepreneurial or social ventures after high school are opening doors for students who are eager to discover the new
    • Amy Burvall
       
      are any of you thinking about this?
  • How to be usefully wrong.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      do you know how to be usefully wrong?
  • If failure is not an option, then neither is success.
  • We can (and must) teach these skills, starting with kids who are happy to build towers out of blocks (and watch them fall down) and continuing with the students who would never even consider buying a term paper to avoid an essay in college.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      like we were discussing with the cheating projects
  • It’s essential that the school of the future teach music. The passion of seeing progress, the hard work of practice, the joy and fear of public performance—these are critical skills for our future.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      I've never thought about music courses in that way- maybe they are the key
  • Real learning happens when the student wants (insists!) on acquiring a skill in order to accomplish a goal.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      when has this last happened in your life?
  • When access to information was limited, we needed to load students up with facts. Now, when we have no scarcity of facts or the access to them, we need to load them up with understanding.

  • What if we put 80 percent of that effort into making huge progress in teaching every kid to care, to set goals, to engage, to speak intelligently, to plan, to make good decisions, and to lead?
    • Amy Burvall
       
      hmmm. what do you think about this?
  • Textbooks rarely teach us lessons we long remember. We learn about self-reliance when we get lost in the mall, we learn about public speaking when we have to stand up and give a speech.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      what is a lesson you will never forget and when or how did you learn it?
  • If you could add just one course

    Neil deGrasse Tyson, astronomer and head of the Museum of Natural History in New York, adds this one: “How to tell when someone else is full of it.”

    I’d augment that with: “And how to tell when you are.”

    • Amy Burvall
       
      i LOVE this!
  • Other topics that are just like computer programming
    • Amy Burvall
       
      courses built on problem solving...but what about problem finding?
  • Shepard Fairey,
    • Amy Burvall
       
      shout out to one of my favorite self-made street artists
  • And being cared about, connected with, and pushed is the platform we need to do the emotional heavy lifting of committing to learn.
  • our responsibility is to amplify drive, not use lack of talent as a cheap excuse for our failure to nurture dreams
  • Let’s define dumb as being different from stupid.

    Dumb means you don’t know what you’re supposed to know. Stupid means you know it but make bad choices.

    • Amy Burvall
       
      do you agree with his definitions?
  • Today, dumb is a choice, one that’s made by individuals who choose not to learn.

    If you don’t know what you need to know, that’s fixable. But first you have to want to fix it.

  • Give me a motivated block builder with a jumbled box of Legos over a memorizing drone any day. If we can’t (or won’t, or don’t want to) win the race to the bottom, perhaps we could seriously invest in the race to the top.
  • Because we’re in such a hurry to drill and practice the techniques on the SAT or Regents exam, we believe we don’t have time to have students spend a week to independently invent the method of completing the square.
  • “what did you figure out today?”
  • Is the memorization and drill and practice of advanced math the best way to sell kids on becoming scientists and engineers?

    If not, then let’s fix it.

  • Is there a better way to learn than by doing?
  • Davidson doesn’t use term papers in her class—instead, she has created a series of blog assignments as well as a rotating cast of student leaders who interact with each and every post. Her students write more, write more often, and write better than the ones down the hall in the traditional “churn it out” writing class.

    She is teaching her students how to learn, not how to be perfect.

  • It doesn’t matter if you’re able to do high-level math or analyze memes over time. If you’re unable or unwilling to build bridges between the real world and those symbols, you can’t make an impact on the world.
  • The shift now is this: school used to be a one-shot deal, your own, best chance to be exposed to what happened when and why. School was the place where the books lived and where the experts were accessible.
  • Want to watch a movie? Netflix is a better librarian, with a better library, than any library in the country. The Netflix librarian knows about every movie, knows what you’ve seen and what you’re likely to want to see. If the goal is to connect viewers with movies, Netflix wins.

  • Wikipedia and the huge databanks of information have basically eliminated the library as the best resource for anyone doing amateur research (grade school, middle school, even undergrad)
  • They need a librarian more than ever (to figure out creative ways to find and use data). They need a library not at all.

  • ost-Gutenberg, books are finally abundant, hardly scarce, hardly expensive, hardly worth warehousing. Post-Gutenberg, the scarce resources are knowledge and insight, not access to data.

  • The next library is filled with so many Web terminals that there’s always at least one empty. And the people who run this library don’t view the combination of access to data and connections to peers as a sidelight—it’s the entire point.

  • If we view the purpose of college as a stepping stone, one that helps you jump the line while looking for a good job, then a famous college is the way to go. The line for those good jobs is long, and a significant benefit of a famous college is more than superstition—associating with that fame may get you a better first job.
  • Access to information is not the same as education
  • Stanford University has put up many of their courses online for free, and some have more than 30,000 active students at a time.
    • Amy Burvall
       
      what will happen when all major universities do this?
  • A university delivers four things:

    Access to information (not perspective or understanding, but access)

    Accreditation/A scarce degree

    Membership in a tribe

    A situation for growth (which is where you’d file perspective and understanding)

  • Given that all the major universities ought to/should/will create a university of the people—giving access to information and great teachers to all (and if they don’t, someone should and will, soon)—which of the other three really matter?
    • Amy Burvall
       
      what do you think?
  • The best way to complain is to make things”

     

    • Amy Burvall
       
      one of my favorite quotes
  • if you don’t underestimate me, I won’t underestimate you
    • Briana Grenert
       
      How do you know if you're underestimating someone? How can you purposefully underestimate someone? And why would you do that? Or is Bob Dylan trying to say that only if people estimate him correctly and treat him as deserves can he see their true value? 
  • Higher ed is going to cha
    • Briana Grenert
       
      Ironic because, right now, I am digitally high lighting this document.
  • It’s not surprising that early on, many teachers found support in unions.
    • Zachary
       
      I think that Unions are the worst thing for schools. Unions only get in the way of teaching students. Most of the time Students can't learn because the teacher's unions are holding up the administration because they want more vacation or higher pay. 
  • The pursuit of knowledge for its own sake
    • Iona Unguran
       
      I believe he makes a point here : what's the point of being knowledgeable except for... being knowledgeable ?
  • Obedient
    • Iona Unguran
       
      This guy obviously hasn't read the IB objectives. Obedient ? Is that really the one thing school would teach us ?
  • The current structure, which seeks low-cost uniformity that meets minimum standards, is killing our economy, our culture, and us.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Low cost uniformity ? I feel like he's making it too general... First, 16000 bucks a year doesn't seem so low cost to me, and we can't focus on the schools in Harlem and omit the rest.
  • Our culture has a dreaming problem.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      I have to agree with that; but it might have been this way for ever; and more important, how do we fix "dreaming problems" ?
  • Access to any course, anywhere in the world
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Interesting ! But what about the language it's in ? The idea is kind of limited by that.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      I like the idea, bur language might be the limit...
  • “it is better to be a human being dissatisfied than a pig satisfied; better to be Socrates dissatisfied than a fool satisfied. And if the fool, or the pig, are of a different opinion, it is because they only know their own side of the question.”
    • Iona Unguran
       
      I like that quote. It implies many things, and among them the fact that maybe taking other points of view into consideration is the smart thing to do.
  • Is it too risky to do the right thing?
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Sometimes ; but it's still the right thing to do.
  • School needs to put us on the spot.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      I must disagree. I think we're the only ones who can put ourselves 'on the spot'. "Emancipate yourself from mental slavery, none but ourselves can free our mind" [Bob Marley]
  • Harlem is a big place, bigger than most towns in the United States.
  • Dreamers can be impatient, unwilling to become well-rounded, and most of all, hard to fit into existing systems.
    • Jasmine Baginski
       
      I strongly disagree with this statement. Dreamers are willing to do whatever it takes to reach their goals, and therefore they are willing to put in work. To work towards something, a result, may require a lot of patience. A dreamer will find that patience and make their dream a reality. As for being a well-rounded individual, I don't see how chasing dreams affects that area at all.
  • A million movies have trained us about what to expect from a school in East Harlem.
    • Claire Godenzi
       
      It is funny how easily media can create stereotypes about a place/person/thing and how much it influences our views and how we feel about them...
  • help them memorize something that someone else could look up, it’s time wasted
    • Iona Unguran
       
      I like that principle of trying to come up with your own ideas ! But I the meanwhile, learning what other people before you came up with is truly important for that.
  • And yet… most of us wing it. We make the same mistakes that many who came before us do, and we shy away from the hard (but incredibly useful) work of getting better at the things that matter.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Yes, but why give up what's already taught in school ? Why not just add everything together ?
  • Don’t wait for it. Pick yourself. Teach yourself.
    • Iona Unguran
       
      Wha, that's a concrete and interesting solution ! We should remember this.
  • Now that we’ve built an industrial solution to teaching in bulk, we’ve seduced ourselves into believing that the only thing that can be taught is the way to get high SAT scores.

    We shouldn’t be buying this.

    • Jasmine Baginski
       
      I agree! A good score on an SAT doesn't prove anything but the ability to memorize a bunch of facts; it is not a good indicator as to whether or not the test taker will be able to apply skills to real life situations.
  • It’s diffic
  • ociety is being fundamentally changed by the impact of the internet and the connection economy.
    • danniblack
       
      With the invention of the internet, humans have come to rely on looking something up, rather than finding the information for themselves. The impact of the internet has created a generation of humans that are very lazy; because we are able to do pretty much everything without even getting out of a seat.
  • Mass production desires to produce mass
  • were invented before w
  • g Dreams
  • passionate
    • Nate Hopper
       
      I like this sentence. I think schools should be less robotic about reading books.
  • If this sounds parallel to the notion of factories producing items in bulk, of interchangeable parts, of the notion of measurement and quality, it’s not an accident.
    • Nate Hopper
       
      Reminds me of Pink Floyd. He illustrates the idea of kids going into a factory and coming out all the same in his album "The Wall"
  • “The best way to complain is to make things”

     

    • Madeline St John
       
      This quote is pretty awesome and I think its true. People tend to listen more if you actually have some work and creativity in your complaints. Like Banksy, making art about problems in society. I think satire is also a good way to complain about things. It gets people's attention. The point of complaining is to highlight the problem. Then we have to do something about it.
  • values customization
    • Madeline St John
       
      This reminds me of the customization of technology that we have and how people can set their desktop background and bookmark things and have their own accounts on pretty much everything. Everything is customizable and when things are more customizable, people become more attached to them, I think, and value them more. So customizing school could only be a good thing. There is something about everyone learning the same thing, though, that builds community (albeit not a very divers one...).
  • Being surrounded by educated people makes democracy stronger
  • Being surrounded by educated people makes democracy stronger
  • Being surrounded by educated people makes democracy stronger
    • Madeline St John
       
      If people are educated pursue knowledge and think for themselves...yes.
  • If the goal was to raise the standards for rational thought, skeptical investigation, and useful decision making, we’ve failed for most of our citizens.
    • Madeline St John
       
      I think because we are spoon-fed a lot of stuff in school and taught to believe whatever our teachers tell us a lot of people will just end up believing whatever people tell them, even if its tv or a chain email or someone on a web forum.
  • Goal-setting
  • be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity.
  • …be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity.
  • …be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity.
  • …be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity.
    • Ashley W.
       
      "Low-wage kids were taking jobs away from hard-working adults." Before, kids would work with a low- wage, and now are receiving education to work for a higher pay. This demonstrates how there are sooo much changes that occur throughout time. Adults used were insensed and intimitated from kids working for a low- wage (child labor) as kids were taking over jobs, but now it is more reliant on education and not age groups.
  • The world has changed, of course. It has changed into a culture fueled by a market that knows how to mass-customize, to find the edges and the weird, and to cater to what the individual demands instead of insisting on conformity.
    • Ashley W.
       
      It is interesting seeing how the world changes so quickly in which everything just sums up to a main topic in which it changed for. While reading this, it sounds rather selfish to see the world change to "cater to what the individual demands."
  • Dreams
  • handy PDF
  • go do your best
    • Kristen Takenaka
       
      In our society, people in stereotypical towns like Harlem, think that the schools are bad and poor. The amount of teachers are low, money to fund the schools is "not enough" and "our expectations are very low". And when society says that, they still want us to believe that the students can do/try their best. How can the students do their best if there is no hope in the schools? Why would they in the first place?
  • To train people to become productive workers.
    • Kristen Takenaka
       
      Schools way back when didn't train people to become workers. Like the TED talk about what is school for?, schools for the past 200 years (?) have been teaching students to become obedient to the teachers. How did schools come to that conclusion, that students have to become "productive workers"?