Skip to main content

Home/ SLAVConnects/ Group items tagged ethics

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Rhondda Powling

Cool Cat Teacher Blog - Be a Better Teacher. Live a Meaningful Life. - 0 views

  •  
    David Raymond @dnomyard is part of equipping Virginia high school students to defend themselves from cyber attacks. With knowledge in digital forensics and current technology, the Virginia Cyber Range is working to lead the world in educating its students on cyber security. Learn how in this wide-ranging conversation about modern security.
Rhondda Powling

Finding copyright-friendly photos for the Google Images generation - eClassroom News - 1 views

  •  
    "Searching and citing usable images is easy once students learn the basics
    Teaching students to respect the intellectual property of others is important in this digital "cut and paste" world we live in. One great project to share with students that can better help them understand how and when they may use images created by others is the Creative Commons project.
    Creative Commons is designed to span the gap between full copyright and the public domain. The Creative Commons project provides content creators the opportunity to state ahead of time how their images may (or may not) be used."
Rhondda Powling

Did I Plagiarize? The Types and Severity of Plagiarism Violations - 1 views

  •  
    Good infographic on plagiarism. It would be a useful document to use with students to teach them about plagiarism: what constitutes an act of plagiarism and the different types of copyright violations that can occur. The image is not free. You read it online as large version by clicking on the image but you will need to purchase it if you want a copy to put up onto a wall. If you are looking for what web tools are available to help detect plagiarism this list is a good place to start.
Camilla Elliott

Copyright in a Copy Paste World - 0 views

  •  
    "Plagiarism comes from the same root word as the word "kidnap". Whether you take someone's work intentionally or unintentionally and claim it as your own, you are plagiarizing."
  •  
    "Plagiarism comes from the same root word as the word "kidnap". Whether you take someone's work intentionally or unintentionally and claim it as your own, you are plagiarizing."
1 - 4 of 4
Showing 20 items per page