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Paul Whelan

Visualizing the Decline of Empires: SIGGRAPH 2010 - 2 views

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    My professor showed this video in my Computer Graphics class. Had to share.
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    A little trippy, and very interesting.
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    1960-1980... Can't keep up!
Christopher Lioi

Satellite crash site, narrowing the probability | NowPublic News Coverage - 1 views

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    This article approaches probability axiomatically. The scientists first estimated how many of the fragments of satellite would burn up on reentry based on their size. Then, for the components they expect survived the reentry, they determined the probability that they would hit any populated area and cause damage. They reasoned that since most of the planet's surface is water, there is a greater probability for the satellite debris to land in the ocean rather than on land.
Derek Bruff

FiveThirtyEight: Live Coverage of South Carolina Primary - NYTimes.com - 1 views

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    Note the lack of pie charts here...
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    anyqs

    How was the chance of winning calculated based on the percent voting range? I feel like theres an easy formula for this, it's just not immediately obvious (to me anyway).
Derek Bruff

U.S. Science Degrees Are Up: Scientific American - 3 views

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    anyqs: The article says "more women are entering college, which in turn is changing the relative popularity of disciplines," but doesn't say exactly what percentage of degrees awarded in each discipline go to women. I'm wondering what that percentage is. It would have been nice to have seen the number of degrees awarded to women and men in each discipline visualized with the number of degrees awarded.
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    anyqs: It is true that more students are earning science degrees than they did twenty years ago, but it is also true that more students are earning degrees, period. Note the growth in arts, music, and business degrees awarded. It would be good to know the percentage of the total increase in degrees awarded for each discipline.
zachary sanicola

History of the USA in a circle - 7 views

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    anyqs

    Simple question really. What size did the designer of this chart intend it to be? It would have to be pasted onto the moon for anybody to be able to read the font. #thinkofyouraudience
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    anyqs

    Do the bubbles in the middle that account for the average national debt of the economy take anything else into account? For example, the percentage of GDP that the national debt is would be a better statistic, in my opinion.
Jon Getz

A Defense of Sudden Death Playoffs in Baseball » Skeptical Sports Analysis - 0 views

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    This is a cool argument for the new (next season) 1 game playoff between the top two wild-card teams in the NL and AL, and why it should work
Ted Lawrence

Urban Omnibus » Let's Talk About Maps 2 - 4 views

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    I think these maps are much nicer than the color maps that I found in my high school history classes. The 3D aspect of them is much nicer than the heat maps I have become accustomed to. They really allow you to see the how many more people live in some regions than in others. anyqs
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    The graph of the population distribution of the US is a very interesting statistical representation. There is one outlying area that I noticed. In southern Florida there seems to be a very sparsely populated area and this map brings up the question of why this would be the case. Most of the coast surrounding this area is densely populated, so is there a geographic barrier there that prevents dense human settlement? anyqs
Teddy Weaver

Vehicles involved in fatal crashes - 1 views

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    :)
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    I wonder how many were alcohol related since the days with the most wrecks were Fri, Sat, and Sun?
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    It would be interesting to compare the number of cars on the road to the number of fatal crashes, or even the total number of crashes to fatal crashes.
Seth Friedman

American Dudes and Fast Food - 7 views

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    Why are straws included in the most loved things at McDonalds? Wouldn't straws be included in Shakes? Although I guess you can eat a shake with a spoon :P
    Secondly, McDonalds is ubiquitous. How can they make conclusions about customer's "loyalty" when some people may not even have a chipotle, the restaurant with the lowest "loyalty", near them?

    anyqs
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    anyqs
    I'm curious about the socioeconomic status of the customers and how they order off the menu. From my experience as a McDonald's employee, the lower-income bracket orders off the dollar menu, while families order value-meals and kids-meals, but that's just personal observations. I am curious to see if there is an actual relationship between the two.
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    anyqs

    Im curious as how they can even begin to compare McDonalds and Chipotle in the first place? It would have been easier for them to just compare them to eating at a non fast food restaurant than a specific one. SOme of the people sampled might not even enjoy chipotle.

    Also, I dont understand why the hot sauce portion is even included in the data. It doesn't seem to correlate with the rest of the data.
James Booge

Where the Trees Are : Image of the Day - 7 views

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    anyqs

    How has the tree distribution has changed since 2002? It would be valuable to see areas of recent over-logging in red and areas of new growth in a lighter green.
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    anyqs

    This visualization is pretty interesting however I feel its lacking something to compare it to. I wonder how this tree distribution differs from the pre-industrial revolution distribution? Is today's tree distribution worse than before because of pollution and over-foresting? I also agree with Taylor, I think a different color like red to show recent over-logging would be very valuable to the viewer.

    anyqs
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    anyqs

    I wonder how the distribution of trees in the North West would change if we counted trees, not Biomass in tonnes, since so many of the trees there are large Redwoods which are considerably heavier trees due to their size.
Josh Jones

The Greatest Basketball Players of All Time | Tableau Software - 6 views

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    Statistically shows who should be considered the greatest basketball players of all time based on different accomplishments.
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    "anyqs"

    This is a very cool way to see how players from the past rack up to one another. One of my questions is how did they come up with a a methodology to rank the award achievement points, and do they believe this method can be used to rank all players versus one another? It seems like using this method, guys who have played with multiple championship teams who are not considered stars could then rank really highly, even though they might not have played a huge role in the championships won (NBA championships are the most achievement points). If all the NBA players were put on this chart, then some people could be mislead, as a guy like Charles Barkley could rank lower than say Derek Fisher, even though Fisher would is not considered on the same star level as Barkley.
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    anyqs

    How was the scoring of the achievement decided? For example, why is the pointage for Playoff Appearances 0? And it seems like there's a significant penalty for people who've never won a championship, despite their skill level. Is it fair to discount a player's all time greatness, if they were never on a team good enough to win a championship? Like John Stockton, one of the greatest point guards of all time. Leads the league in career assists by over 4000 (with 15,000+), but is given a very low ranking for his skill and effect on the game, because of his lack of rings. There's an odd skew, and while championship rings are a massive deal, they're not everything.
Robert Jackson

Pick your poison - 10 views

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    That's a pretty nice segmented bar chart on the right.
  • ...2 more comments...
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    anyqs
    How many people did they sample, and did they just find them at bars?
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    There seems to be a trend that the lower income bracket prefers beer and the higher income bracket prefers wine. What I find interesting is that all incomes prefer liquor equally. I wonder why this is true?

    Also it says that last year they surveyed people about their preferences but where did they get the data for previous years?

    Lastly, it states no information on how reliable the data is or what method of sampling was used.

    anyqs
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    anyqs: I would like to know how big the sample size was. Also, how many of the participants are actual college students? I'd like to see the data on purely college students.
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    anyqs: I would definitely like to see some more info on this, the things mentioned above as well as what N/A actually means. Does it mean non drinker? Also I'm guessing that they did not poll anyone under 21. I think there's more non-drinkers than drinkers under 21 but including that group would certainly change things (most likely lessen the wine numbers). Finally, it's not a big deal but the 36% for beer in 2011 appears higher up on the graph than the 36% in 2005.
ngould27

The Republican primary in one graph - 4 views

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    "anyqs"

    I'm very interested in how exactly the poll defines a "Republican-leaning independent". Was it self-reported? Were the subjects asked about their views on certain issues, and, if so, how was a "Republican" viewpoint determined?

    In addition, I'm curious as to what the sample size is for this data, as well as what a rough population number would be. For registered Republicans, I feel like this would be easy to calculate, but it would be rather difficult to determine the population size for "Republican-leaning independents" depending on what method was used.
James Trippe

The New York Times' Cascade: Data Visualization for Tweets [VIDEO] - 2 views

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    Has a couple of videos with very detailed data visualization techniques employed by the New York Times to monitor the way their social media articles propagate through the internet. It evolves with time and shows many variables including the number of user's reading it and their locations. 
Natalie Thoni

RealClearPolitics - 2012 Election Maps - Battle for White House - 2 views

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    anyqs

    What polling statistics were used and what were the cut-offs for each category?
Joseph Newman

Reducing Your Chances of Dying in a Plane Crash - 4 views

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    The question that really jumps out at me is in the section with the greyscale plane diagrams - Do the planes with the most fatalities also have more cumulative flights? The ratio of planes in service to accidents gives some scaling data, but it's entirely possible that the seemingly dangerous Boeing 737 family has made many more cumulative flights than its counterparts. "anyqs?"
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    anyqs

    For the safety record (fatal accidents by airline), does the bigger the font size represent the higher frequency of fatal accidents? Or is it represent the higher number of fatality? Its kinda define ambiguous because in an fatal accident, the fatality also depends on the size of aircraft and number of passengers. A 120 passengers aircraft with 10 fatal accidents is better than a 230 passengers aircraft with 6 fatal accidents.
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    anyqs

    For the bad month, I am so confuse with the circle. It only says January, May and August that had the most fatal accidents. Does that means that every other month no accident occur and what make these months so special? Is it because it is school holiday and people decided to go somewhere? I mean every other month have school holidays too or does this refer to America only because in Malaysia we have school holidays in June and Dec.
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    anyqs

    I don't understand why there're numbers for only 3 months in the "bad month" section. For the bad flight, how are they bad? Does it mean those flights have the most crashes?
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    In the display of the number of crashes by month, does the thickness of the circle represent anything in the data because some circles are thicker than others, or are the numbers being compared just based on the diameter of the circles?
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    anyqs

    In the second display, I'm confused with in ratio of the number of the planes in service to fatal accidents. The ratio is interpreted as an indicator of the safety factor of the plane. However, in my opinion, the larger plane is taking a higher risk of suffering more casualties rather than comparing their in service ratios.
Dan Hasday

Digg vs Reddit [Infographic] - Rate Rush - 1 views

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    anyqs

    This is a very interesting infographic because I use both diig and reddit and most of the information follows a pattern I have noticed. But I feel it could be better if it also shows the number of users that use both sites.
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