Skip to main content

Home/ Lecture et écriture du texte numérique/ Group items tagged littéracie

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Michel Roland-Guill

Matières Vivantes » Blog Archive » Les geeks sont-ils anti "intellectuels"? - 0 views

  •  
    Larry Sanger
Michel Roland-Guill

Rough Type: Nicholas Carr's Blog: Killing Mnemosyne - 1 views

  • Isidore, the bishop of Seville, remarked how reading “the sayings” of thinkers in books “render[ed] their escape from memory less easy.”
  • Shakespeare has Hamlet call his memory “the book and volume of my brain.”
    • Michel Roland-Guill
       
      Dante: "In quella parte del libro de la mia memoria, dinanzi a la quale poco si potrebbe leggere, si trova una rubrica la quale dice: In quella parte del libro de la mia memoria, dinanzi a la quale poco si potrebbe leggere, si trova una rubrica la quale dice: INCIPIT VITA NOVA."
  • Books provide a supplement to memory, but they also, as Eco puts it, “challenge and improve memory; they do not narcotize it.”
    • Michel Roland-Guill
       
      Voir chez Jack Goody comment la mémoire dite "par coeur" dépend de la textualité.
  • ...19 more annotations...
  • Erasmus, in his 1512 textbook De Copia, stressed the connection between memory and reading. He urged students to annotate their books
  • He also suggested that every student and teacher keep a notebook, organized by subject, “so that whenever he lights on anything worth noting down, he may write it in the appropriate section.”
    • Michel Roland-Guill
       
      Voir Darnton qui récemment voyait dans les livres d'extraits la preuve que les empans brefs ne dataient pas d'hier...
  • kinds of flowers
    • Michel Roland-Guill
       
      > "anthologie"
  • To him, memorizing was far more than a means of storage
  • Far from being a mechanical, mindless process, Erasmus’s brand of memorization engaged the mind fully
    • Michel Roland-Guill
       
      Il faudrait référer cette thématique érasmienne à la problématique plus large de la mémoire et de l'éducation à la Renaissance. Montaigne, Rabelais, "tête bien faite", vs "bien pleine".
  • “We should imitate bees,” Seneca wrote, “and we should keep in separate compartments whatever we have collected from our diverse reading, for things conserved separately keep better. Then, diligently applying all the resources of our native talent, we should mingle all the various nectars we have tasted, and then turn them into a single sweet substance, in such a way that, even if it is apparent where it originated, it appears quite different from what it was in its original state.”
  • Memory, for Seneca as for Erasmus, was as much a crucible as a container.
  • “commonplace books,”
  • Francis Bacon
  • “a gentleman’s commonplace book” served “both as a vehicle for and a chronicle of his intellectual development.”
  • The arrival of the limitless and easily searchable data banks of the Internet brought a further shift, not just in the way we view memorization but in the way we view memory itself.
  • Clive Thompson, the Wired writer, refers to the Net as an “outboard brain”
  • David Brooks
  • “I had thought that the magic of the information age was that it allowed us to know more,” he writes, “but then I realized the magic of the information age is that it allows us to know less. It provides us with external cognitive servants—silicon memory systems, collaborative online filters, consumer preference algorithms and networked knowledge. We can burden these servants and liberate ourselves.”
  • Peter Suderman
  • “it’s no longer terribly efficient to use our brains to store information.”
  • “Why memorize the content of a single book when you could be using your brain to hold a quick guide to an entire library? Rather than memorize information, we now store it digitally and just remember what we stored.”
  • Don Tapscott, the technology writer, puts it more bluntly. Now that we can look up anything “with a click on Google,” he says, “memorizing long passages or historical facts” is obsolete.
    • Michel Roland-Guill
       
      "Google" > inutilité des outils de mémorisation (signets) eux-mêmes!
  • When, in an 1892 lecture before a group of teachers, William James declared that “the art of remembering is the art of thinking,” he was stating the obvious.
1 - 2 of 2
Showing 20 items per page