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Michel Roland-Guill

How the net traps us all in our own little bubbles | Technology | The Observer - 3 views

  • The basic code at the heart of the new internet is pretty simple. The new generation of internet filters looks at the things you seem to like – the actual things you've done, or the things people like you like – and tries to extrapolate. They are prediction engines, constantly creating and refining a theory of who you are and what you'll do and want next.
    • Michel Roland-Guill
       
      Externalisation de la construction de l'identité
  • you're the only person in your bubble
  • the filter bubble is a centrifugal force, pulling us apart.
  • ...18 more annotations...
  • the filter bubble is invisible
  • from within the bubble, it's nearly impossible to see how biased it is
  • you don't choose to enter the bubble
  • the filter bubble can affect your ability to choose how you want to live. To be the author of your life, professor Yochai Benkler argues, you have to be aware of a diverse array of options and lifestyles. When you enter a filter bubble, you're letting the companies that construct it choose which options you're aware of
  • You can get stuck in a static, ever- narrowing version of yourself – an endless you-loop.
  • Bowling Alone, his book on the decline of civic life in America, Robert Putnam
  • major decrease in "social capital" – the bonds of trust and allegiance that encourage people to do each other favours
  • our virtual neighbours look more and more like our real-world neighbours, and our real-world neighbours look more and more like us.
  • We're getting a lot of bonding but very little bridging
  • It's easy to push "Like" and increase the visibility of a friend's post about finishing a marathon or an instructional article about how to make onion soup. It's harder to push the "Like" button on an article titled "Darfur sees bloodiest month in two years".
  • "It's a civic virtue to be exposed to things that appear to be outside your interest," technology journalist Clive Thompson told me.
  • More and more, your computer monitor is a kind of one-way mirror, reflecting your own interests while algorithmic observers watch what you click.
  • Starting that morning, Google would use 57 signals – everything from where you were logging in from to what browser you were using to what you had searched for before – to make guesses about who you were and what kinds of sites you'd like. Even if you were logged out, it would customise its results, showing you the pages it predicted you were most likely to click on.
  • With Google personalised for everyone, the query "stem cells" might produce diametrically opposed results for scientists who support stem-cell research and activists who oppose it.
  • on 4 December 2009 the era of personalisation began
  • What was once an anonymous medium where anyone could be anyone – where, in the words of the famous New Yorker cartoon, nobody knows you're a dog – is now a tool for soliciting and analysing our personal data.
  • "You're getting a free service, and the cost is information about you. And Google and Facebook translate that pretty directly into money."
  • Acxiom alone has accumulated an average of 1,500 pieces of data on each person on its database – which includes 96% of Americans – along with data about everything from their credit scores to whether they've bought medication for incontinence.
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    il est temps de proposer une critique - francophone ! - de ce social web que l'on nous propose, et l'on alimente, et qui structure nos vies de plus en plus; indispensable littéracie au delà du search et de l'identité numérique; merci pour ce signet
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