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Michel Roland-Guill

How people read online: Why you won't finish this article. - Slate Magazine - 0 views

  • The more I type, the more of you tune out. And it’s not just me.
  • lots of people are tweeting out links to articles they haven’t fully read.
  • There’s a very weak relationship between scroll depth and sharing.
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  • articles that get a lot of tweets don’t necessarily get read very deeply.
Michel Roland-Guill

Sapiens : "Claire Sergent : « Quand la conscience empêche de voir »" - La Rec... - 0 views

  • Deux théories s'affrontent en effet sur la différence entre perception consciente et non consciente. L'une, alimentée surtout par les études en IRM, prédit qu'il y a une sorte de continuité entre les deux types de traitement : le non-conscient correspondrait à l'activation des mêmes aires cérébrales que le conscient mais avec une intensité moindre. L'autre prédit qu'il existe au contraire une rupture. Nous avons déjà obtenu dans notre laboratoire des résultats allant dans le sens de cette deuxième théorie.
  • Nous avons trouvé que la perception consciente du deuxième mot dépend de la vitesse à laquelle est traité le premier. Nous avons identifié une différence dans la dynamique d'une onde appelée P300 correspondant à l'activité d'un réseau fronto-pariétal. Lorsque le sujet voit le deuxième mot, c'est que cette onde a été rapide pour le premier mot, avec un pic élevé très tôt. Mais, s'il ne voit pas le deuxième mot, l'onde P300 a été moins intense et plus longue pour le premier mot, et elle est carrément absente pour le deuxième mot. C'est donc que le traitement plus long de l'onde P300 pour le premier mot empêche le second d'être perçu.
Michel Roland-Guill

The End of Solitude - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • The camera has created a culture of celebrity; the computer is creating a culture of connectivity. As the two technologies converge — broadband tipping the Web from text to image, social-networking sites spreading the mesh of interconnection ever wider — the two cultures betray a common impulse. Celebrity and connectivity are both ways of becoming known. This is what the contemporary self wants. It wants to be recognized, wants to be connected: It wants to be visible.
  • I once asked my students about the place that solitude has in their lives. One of them admitted that she finds the prospect of being alone so unsettling that she'll sit with a friend even when she has a paper to write. Another said, why would anyone want to be alone?

  • Man may be a social animal, but solitude has traditionally been a societal value. In particular, the act of being alone has been understood as an essential dimension of religious experience, albeit one restricted to a self-selected few. Through the solitude of rare spirits, the collective renews its relationship with divinity.
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  • Communal experience is the human norm, but the solitary encounter with God is the egregious act that refreshes that norm.
  • Like other religious values, solitude was democratized by the Reformation and secularized by Romanticism.
  • The child who grew up between the world wars as part of an extended family within a tight-knit urban community became the grandparent of a kid who sat alone in front of a big television, in a big house, on a big lot. We were lost in space.

    Under those circumstances, the Internet arrived as an incalculable blessing

  • For Emerson, "the soul environs itself with friends, that it may enter into a grander self-acquaintance or solitude; and it goes alone, for a season, that it may exalt its conversation or society."
  • Modernism decoupled this dialectic. Its notion of solitude was harsher, more adversarial, more isolating. As a model of the self and its interactions, Hume's social sympathy gave way to Pater's thick wall of personality and Freud's narcissism — the sense that the soul, self-enclosed and inaccessible to others, can't choose but be alone. With exceptions, like Woolf, the modernists fought shy of friendship. Joyce and Proust disparaged it; D.H. Lawrence was wary of it; the modernist friendship pairs — Conrad and Ford, Eliot and Pound, Hemingway and Fitzgerald — were altogether cooler than their Romantic counterparts.
  • Protestant self-examination becomes Freudian analysis, and the culture hero, once a prophet of God and then a poet of Nature, is now a novelist of self — a Dostoyevsky, a Joyce, a Proust.
  • Romantic solitude existed in a dialectical relationship with sociability
  • My students told me they have little time for intimacy. And of course, they have no time at all for solitude.

    But at least friendship, if not intimacy, is still something they want.

  • In fact, their use of technology — or to be fair, our use of technology — seems to involve a constant effort to stave off the possibility of solitude, a continuous attempt, as we sit alone at our computers, to maintain the imaginative presence of others.
  • The more we keep aloneness at bay, the less are we able to deal with it and the more terrifying it gets.
  • the previous generation's experience of boredom
  • The two emotions, loneliness and boredom, are closely allied. They are also both characteristically modern. The Oxford English Dictionary's earliest citations of either word, at least in the contemporary sense, date from the 19th century.
  • Boredom is not a necessary consequence of having nothing to do, it is only the negative experience of that state. Television, by obviating the need to learn how to make use of one's lack of occupation, precludes one from ever discovering how to enjoy it. In fact, it renders that condition fearsome, its prospect intolerable. You are terrified of being bored — so you turn on the television.
  • consumer society wants to condition us to feel bored, since boredom creates a market for stimulation.
  • The alternative to boredom is what Whitman called idleness: a passive receptivity to the world.
  • Loneliness is not the absence of company, it is grief over that absence.
  • Internet is as powerful a machine for the production of loneliness as television is for the manufacture of boredom.
  • And losing solitude, what have they lost? First, the propensity for introspection, that examination of the self that the Puritans, and the Romantics, and the modernists (and Socrates, for that matter) placed at the center of spiritual life — of wisdom, of conduct. Thoreau called it fishing "in the Walden Pond of [our] own natures," "bait[ing our] hooks with darkness." Lost, too, is the related propensity for sustained reading.
  • Solitude, Emerson said, "is to genius the stern friend." "He who should inspire and lead his race must be defended from traveling with the souls of other men, from living, breathing, reading, and writing in the daily, time-worn yoke of their opinions." One must protect oneself from the momentum of intellectual and moral consensus — especially, Emerson added, during youth.
  • The university was to be praised, Emerson believed, if only because it provided its charges with "a separate chamber and fire" — the physical space of solitude. Today, of course, universities do everything they can to keep their students from being alone, lest they perpetrate self-destructive acts, and also, perhaps, unfashionable thoughts.
  • The last thing to say about solitude is that it isn't very polite.
  • the ability to stand back and observe life dispassionately, is apt to make us a little unpleasant to our fellows
Michel Roland-Guill

Larry Sanger Blog » How not to use the Internet, part 2: the pernicious desig... - 0 views

  • The way that the Internet is designed—not graphic design, but overall habits and architecture—encourages the widespread distractability that I, at least, hate.
  • I learned it from Nicholas Carr
  • Interconnectivity: information that is of some inherent public interest is typically marinated in meta-information: (a) is bathed in (b). It is not enough to make the inherently interesting content instantly available and easy to find; it must also be surrounded by links, sidebars, menus, and other info, and promoted on social media via mail. This is deliberate, but it has gotten worse in the last ten years or so, with the advent of syndicated blog feeds (RSS), then various other social media feeds. This is, of course, supposed to be for the convenience and enlightenment of the user, and no doubt sometimes it is. But I think it usually doesn’t help anybody, except maybe people who are trying to build web traffic.

    Recency: the information to be most loudly announced online is not just recent, but the brand-spanking-newest, and what allegedly deserves our attention now is determined democratically, with special weight given to the opinions of people we know.

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  • soon after we surf to a page of rich media, its interconnections lead us away from whatever led us to the page in the first place,
  • I think there is something really wrong with this design philosophy. We ought to try to change it, if we can.
Michel Roland-Guill

Q10 - 0 views

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    Q10 runs under Windows.
    No version for Linux or Mac is planned.

    Q10 is a simple but powerful text editor designed and built with writers in mind.
Michel Roland-Guill

Dark Room | they.misled.us - 0 views

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    Dark Room is a full screen, distraction free, writing environment. Unlike standard word processors that focus on features, Dark Room is just about you and your text.
Michel Roland-Guill

FocusWriter - Gott Code - 0 views

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    FocusWriter is a simple, distraction-free writing environment. It utilizes a hide-away interface that you access by moving your mouse to the edges of the screen, allowing the program to have a familiar look and feel to it while still getting out of the way so that you can immerse yourself in your work. It's available for Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X, and has been translated into many different languages.
Michel Roland-Guill

Information Architects - Writer for iPad - 0 views

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    The key to good writing is not that magical glass of Bordeaux, the right kind of tobacco or that groovy background music. The key is focus. What you need to write well is a spartan setting that allows you to fully concentrate on your text and nothing but your text. Many professional writers use SimpleText or Textedit because these are the only writing programs that are totally distraction free. But text editors are not perfect. That's why we made Writer.
Michel Roland-Guill

WriteRoom - Distraction free writing software for Mac & iOS - 0 views

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    For Mac iPhone, iPod, & iPad users to write without distractions. WriteRoom is a full screen writing environment. Unlike the cluttered word processors you're used to, WriteRoom lets you focus on writing. Requires Mac OS X 10.7+ or iOS 4.0+
Michel Roland-Guill

It's All Text! :: Add-ons for Firefox - 0 views

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    Edit textareas using an external editor, because it's all text!

    Right click on a textarea, select "It's All Text!" and edit the text in the editor of your choice.
Michel Roland-Guill

Le Figaro - Santé : Les smartphones modifient le fonctionnement du cerveau - 0 views

  • Les développements récents des neurosciences cognitives permettent maintenant d'envisa­ger de véritables programmes d'éducation de l'attention, renseignant sur ses limites et son bon usage. Dans cet univers de multitâche permanent, ce bon usage ne va plus de soi et il est peut-être temps d'envisager une véritable éducation de l'attention, notamment en milieu scolaire, qui prépare dès l'enfance à la vie connectée.
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