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Brett Boessen

New Media Literacies - Learning in a Participatory Culture - 52 views

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    • Brett Boessen
       
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    I am interested in learning new techniques of teaching, a way to get learners attention.
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Bill Genereux

JMS to offer new digital media literacy course : School of Journalism & Media Studies - 21 views

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Bill Genereux

Technology Is Not Enough: Latest Master's in Knowledge Networks | HASTAC - 10 views

  • the Masters in Knowledge Networks requires that students have the technical expertise and project management skills to develop their own digital media projects.
Mike Wesch

Measuring Classroom Progress: 21st Century Assessment Project Wants Your Inpu... - 8 views

  • “21st Century Literacies” compiled by Cathy N. Davidson Media theorist and practitioner Howard Rheingold has talked about four “Twenty-first Century Literacies”—attention, participation, collaboration, and network awareness—that must to be addressed, understood and cultivated in the digital age. (see, http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/rheingold/category?blogid=108&cat=2538). Futurist Alvin Toffler argues that, in the 21st century, we need to know not only the three R’s, but also how to learn, unlearn, and relearn.  Expanding on these, here are ten “literacies” that seem crucial for our discussion of “This Is Your Brain on the Internet.” •  Attention:  What are the new ways that we pay attention in a digital era?  How do we need to change our concepts and practices of attention for a new era?  How do we learn and practice new forms of attention in a digital age? •  Participation:  Only a small percentage of those who use new “participatory” media really contribute.  How do we encourage meaningful interaction and participation?  What is its purpose on a cultural, social, or civic level? •  Collaboration:  How do we encourage meaningful and innovative forms of collaboration?  Studies show that collaboration can simply reconfirm consensus, acting more as peer pressure than a lever to truly original thinking.  HASTAC has cultivated the methodology of “collaboration by difference” to address the most meaningful and effective way that disparate groups can contribute. •  Network awareness:  What can we do to understand how we both thrive as creative individuals and understand our contribution within a network of others?  How do you gain a sense of what that extended network is and what it can do? •  Design:  How is information conveyed differently in diverse digital forms?  How do we understand and practice the elements of good design as part of our communication and interactive practices? •  Narrative, Storytelling:  How do narrative elements shape the information we wish to convey, helping it to have force in a world of competing information? •  Critical consumption of information:  Without a filter (such as editors, experts, and professionals), much information on the Internet can be inaccurate, deceptive, or inadequate.  Old media, of course, share these faults that are exacerbated by digital dissemination.  How do we learn to be critical?  What are the standards of credibility? •  Digital Divides, Digital Participation:  What divisions still remain in digital culture?  Who is included and who is excluded and how do basic aspects of economics, culture, and literacy levels dictate not only who participates in the digital age but how we participate? •  Ethics and Advocacy:  What responsibilities and possibilities exist to move from participation, interchange, collaboration, and communication to actually working towards the greater good of society by digital means in an ethical and responsible manner? •  Learning, Unlearning, and Relearning:  Alvin Toffler has said that, in the rapidly changing world of the twenty-first century, the most important skill anyone can have is the ability to stop in one’s tracks, see what isn’t working, and then find ways to unlearn old patterns and relearn how to learn.  This requires all of the other skills in this program but is perhaps the most important single skill we will teach.  It means that, whenever one thinks nostalgically, wondering if the “good old days” will ever return, that one’s “unlearning” reflex kicks in to force us to think about what we really mean with such a comparison, what good it does us, and what good it does to reverse it.  What can the “good new days” bring?  Even as a thought experiment—gedanken experiment—trying to unlearn one’s reflexive responses to change situation is the only way to become reflective about one’s habits of resistance.
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    ""21st Century Literacies" compiled by Cathy N. Davidson Media theorist and practitioner Howard Rheingold has talked about four "Twenty-first Century Literacies"-attention, participation, collaboration, and network awareness-that must to be addressed, understood and cultivated in the digital age. (see, http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/rheingold/category?blogid=108&cat=2538). Futurist Alvin Toffler argues that, in the 21st century, we need to know not only the three R's, but also how to learn, unlearn, and relearn. Expanding on these, here are ten "literacies" that seem crucial for our discussion of "This Is Your Brain on the Internet." * Attention: What are the new ways that we pay attention in a digital era? How do we need to change our concepts and practices of attention for a new era? How do we learn and practice new forms of attention in a digital age? * Participation: Only a small percentage of those who use new "participatory" media really contribute. How do we encourage meaningful interaction and participation? What is its purpose on a cultural, social, or civic level? * Collaboration: How do we encourage meaningful and innovative forms of collaboration? Studies show that collaboration can simply reconfirm consensus, acting more as peer pressure than a lever to truly original thinking. HASTAC has cultivated the methodology of "collaboration by difference" to address the most meaningful and effective way that disparate groups can contribute. * Network awareness: What can we do to understand how we both thrive as creative individuals and understand our contribution within a network of others? How do you gain a sense of what that extended network is and what it can do? * Design: How is information conveyed differently in diverse digital forms? How do we understand and practice the elements of good design as part of our communication and interactive practices? * Narrative, Storytelling: How do na
Mike Wesch

The Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Media Literacy Education -- Publications -- ... - 0 views

  • Media literacy is the capacity to access, analyze, evaluate, and communicate messages in a wide variety of forms.
  • Like literacy in general, media literacy is applied in a wide variety of contexts—when watching television or reading newspapers, for example, or when posting commentary to a blog. Indeed, media literacy is implicated everywhere one encounters information and entertainment content.
  • The foundation of effective media analysis is the recognition that: • all media messages are constructed • each medium has different characteristics and strengths and a unique language of construction • media messages are produced for particular purposes • all media messages contain embedded values and points of view • people use their individual skills, beliefs, and experiences to construct their own meanings from media messages • media and media messages can influence beliefs, attitudes, values, behaviors, and the democratic process Making media and sharing it with listeners, readers, and viewers is essential to the development of critical thinking and communication skills. Feedback deepens reflection on one’s own editorial and creative choices and helps students grasp the power of communication.
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    Media literacy is the capacity to access, analyze, evaluate, and communicate messages in a wide variety of forms.
Mike Wesch

Principles for a New Media Literacy - Center for Citizen Media - 0 views

  • An anonymous comment on a random blog, by contrast, starts with negative credibility, say –26 or –27. Why on earth should we believe anything said by someone who’s unwilling to stand behind his or her own words? In most cases, the answer is that we should not.
  • For all this, anonymity is essential to preserve. It protects whistleblowers and others for whom speech can be unfairly dangerous. But when people don’t stand behind their words, a reader should always wonder why and make appropriate adjustments.
Mike Wesch

YouTube - Reclaim Your Mind - 0 views

  • Catalysts to say what has never been said, to see what has never been seen. To draw, paint, sing, sculpt, dance and act what has never before been done. To push the envelope of creativity and language. And whats really important is, I call it, the felt presence of direct experience. Which is a fancy term which just simply means we have to stop consuming our culture. We have to create culture. Don't watch TV, don't read magazines, don't even listen to NPR. Create your own roadshow. The nexus of space and time, where you are now, is the most immediate sector of your universe. And if you're worrying about Michael Jackson or Bill Clinton or somebody else, you are disempowered. You are giving it all away to icons. Icons which are maintained by an electronic media, so that you want to dress like X or have lips like Y. This is shit-brained this kind of thinking. That is all cultural diversion. And what is real is you and your friends, your associations, your highs, your orgasms, your hopes, your plans, and your fears. And we are told no. We're unimportant, we're peripheral, get a degree, get a job, get a this, get a that, and then you're a player. You don't even want to play in that game. You want to reclaim your mind and get it out of the hands of the cultural engineers who want to turn you into a half-baked moron consuming all this trash that's being manufactured out of the bones of a dying world. Where is that at?"
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Mike Wesch

Participative Pedagogy for a Literacy of Literacies - Freesouls - 0 views

  • Does knowing something about the way technical architecture influences behavior mean that we can put that knowledge to use?
  • Can inhumane or dehumanizing effects of digital socializing be mitigated or eliminated by better media design?
  • in Coase's Penguin,[7] and then in The Wealth of Networks,[8] Benkler contributed to important theoretical foundations for a new way of thinking about online activity−"commons based peer production," technically made possible by a billion PCs and Internet connections−as a new form of organizing economic production, together with the market and the firm. If Benkler is right, the new story about how humans get things done includes an important corollary−if tools like the PC and the Internet make it easy enough, people are willing to work together for non-market incentives to create software, encyclopedias and archives of public domain literature.
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  • So much of what we take for granted as part of daily life online, from the BIND software that makes domain names work, to the Apache webserver that powers a sizable chunk of the world's websites, to the cheap Linux servers that Google stacks into its global datacloud, was created by volunteers who gave their creations away to make possible something larger−the Web as we know it.
  • Is it possible to understand exactly what it is about the web that makes Wikipedia, Linux, FightAIDS@Home, the Gutenberg Project and Creative Commons possible? And if so, can this theoretical knowledge be put to practical use?
  • "We must now turn our attention to building systems that support human sociality."
  • We must develop a participative pedagogy, assisted by digital media and networked publics, that focuses on catalyzing, inspiring, nourishing, facilitating, and guiding literacies essential to individual and collective life.
  • to humanize the use of instruments that might otherwise enable commodification, mechanization and dehumanization
  • By literacy, I mean, following on Neil Postman and others, the set of skills that enable individuals to encode and decode knowledge and power via speech, writing, printing and collective action, and which, when learned, introduce the individual to a community.
  • Printing did not cause democracy or science, but literate populations, enabled by the printing press, devised systems for citizen governance and collective knowledge creation. The Internet did not cause open source production, Wikipedia or emergent collective responses to natural disasters, but it made it possible for people to act together in new ways, with people they weren't able to organize action with before, in places and at paces for which collective action had never been possible.
  • If print culture shaped the environment in which the Enlightenment blossomed and set the scene for the Industrial Revolution, participatory media might similarly shape the cognitive and social environments in which twenty first century life will take place (a shift in the way our culture operates). For this reason, participatory media literacy is not another subject to be shoehorned into the curriculum as job training for knowledge workers.
  • Like the early days of print, radio, and television, the present structure of the participatory media regime−the political, economic, social and cultural institutions that constrain and empower the way the new medium can be used, and which impose structures on flows of information and capital−is still unsettled. As legislative and regulatory battles, business competition, and social institutions vie to control the new regime, a potentially decisive and presently unknown variable is the degree and kind of public participation. Because the unique power of the new media regime is precisely its participatory potential, the number of people who participate in using it during its formative years, and the skill with which they attempt to take advantage of this potential, is particularly salient.
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