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dr tech

Google records your location even when you tell it not to | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Google says that will prevent the company from remembering where you've been. Google's support page on the subject states: "You can turn off Location History at any time. With Location History off, the places you go are no longer stored." That isn't true. Even with "Location history" paused, some Google apps automatically store time-stamped Location data without asking."
dr tech

Meet Jack. Or, What The Government Could Do With All That Location Data | American Civil Liberties Union - 0 views

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    "Now that we have finalized our systems for the acquisition and processing of Americans' location data (using data from cell phone and license plate readers as well as other sources), I wanted to give you a quick taste of our new system's capabilities in the domestic policing context."
dr tech

North Dakota's COVID-19 contact tracing app leaks location data to Foursquare and a Google Ads ID: Report / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "The app, called Care19, and produced by a company called ProudCrowd that also makes a location-based social networking app for North Dakota State sports fans, generates a random ID number for each person who uses it. Then, it can "anonymously cache the individual's locations throughout the day," storing information about where people spent at least 10 minutes at a time, according to the state website. If users test positive for the coronavirus, they can provide that information to the North Dakota Department of Health for contact-tracing purposes so that other people who spent time near virus patients can potentially be notified."
amenosolja

A Smile Detector and Other Apps You Need to Be Using | WIRED - 0 views

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    "RECHO DOES ONE very simple, little thing: It lets you leave a voice message tied to a location. When other people using the app hit those coordinates, Recho will tell them there's something to listen to. You can use the app to discover different "rechoes" around you, if you actively want to listen in on someone's location-aware thoughts. You can also share interesting soundbytes with your Recho followers. It's a little weird and novel, but ultimately a new way to think about digital exploring a place."
dr tech

'Dalek' commands can hijack smartphones - BBC News - 0 views

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    "Researchers have demonstrated how garbled speech commands hidden in radio or video broadcasts could be used to control a smartphone. The clips, which sound like the Daleks from Doctor Who, can be difficult for humans to understand but still trigger a phone's voice control functionality. The commands could make a smartphone share its location data, make calls and access compromised websites."
dr tech

MIT's 'Kinect of the Future' Device Tracks People Through Walls [VIDEO] - 0 views

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    "The device tracks a single person with an accuracy of plus or minus 10 centimeters - about the size of an adult hand. Apart from the ability to "see" through a wall, its main advantage is that the person being tracked isn't required to wear a transmitter. While other location systems depend on Wi-Fi, this device can track a person's movements within the radius of its radio waves."
dr tech

The Met's helicopter snap of Michael McIntyre is a wake-up call to all of us | James Ball | Comment is free | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "On the surface of it, the incident is entirely trivial: in a thoughtless moment, a police officer on a surveillance helicopter decides to tweet a photo of a celebrity he's spotted (in this case Michael McIntyre), briefly adding the Metropolitan police to the ranks of London paparazzi. The Met's snap had a few features a standard press photo lacks, though, including an exact timestamp, location data, and a vantage point from an expensive and taxpayer-funded aerial spot. Online reaction to the photograph was predictably bad - why are police invading the privacy of someone who's doing nothing wrong? - and was followed by questioning whether the photo breached the Data Protection Act, which it may well have done."
dr tech

When data gets creepy: the secrets we don't realise we're giving away | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Creepy grabs all this geo-location data and puts pins on a map for you. Most of the time, you probably remember to get the privacy settings right. But if you get it wrong just once - maybe the first time you used a new app, maybe before your friend showed you how to change the settings - Creepy will find it, and your home is marked on a map"
dr tech

Revealed: how Whisper app tracks 'anonymous' users | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The company behind Whisper, the social media app that promises users anonymity and claims to be "the safest place on the internet", is tracking the location of its users, including some who have specifically asked not to be followed. The practice of monitoring the whereabouts of Whisper users - including those who have expressly opted out of geolocation services - will alarm users, who are encouraged to disclose intimate details about their private and professional lives."
dr tech

British mobile phone users' movements 'could be sold for profit' | World news | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Many people unwittingly sign up to be location-tracked 24/7, unaware that the highly sensitive data this generates is being used and sold on for profit. Campaigners say that if this information were stolen by hackers, criminals could use it to target children as they leave school or homes after occupants have gone out."
dr tech

Being human: how realistic do we want robots to be? | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Anouk van Maris, a robot cognition specialist who is researching ethical human-robot interaction, has found that comfort levels with robots vary greatly depending on location and culture. "It depends on what you expect from it. Some people love it, others want to run away as soon as it starts moving," she says. "The advantage of a robot that looks human-like is that people feel more comfortable with it being close to them, and it is easier to communicate with it. The big disadvantage is that you expect it to be able to do human things and it often can't.""
dr tech

Researchers find mountains of sensitive data on totalled Teslas in junkyards / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Teslas are incredibly data-hungry, storing massive troves of data about their owners, including videos of crashes, location history, contacts and calendar entries from paired phones, photos of the driver and passengers taken with interior cameras, and other data; this data is stored without encryption, and it is not always clear when Teslas are gathering data, and the only way to comprehensively switch off data-gathering also de-activates over-the-air software updates for the cars, "
dr tech

Chinese companies using GPS tracking device smartwatches to monitor, alert street cleaners - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) - 0 views

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    "Following backlash, the company said it removed the alarm function from the smartwatch, but reports maintain the employees are still being required to wear the device so their location can be tracked."
dr tech

The Trump 2020 app is a voter surveillance tool of extraordinary power | MIT Technology Review - 0 views

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    "Data collection-as Parscale's comment suggested-is perhaps the most powerful thing the Trump 2020 app does. On signing up, users are required to provide a phone number for a verification code, as well as their full name, email address, and zip code. They are also highly encouraged to share the app with their existing contacts. This is part of a campaign strategy for reaching the 40 to 50 million citizens expected to vote for Trump's reelection: to put it bluntly, the campaign says it intends to collect every single one of these voters' cell-phone numbers. This strategy means the app also makes extensive permission requests, asking for access to location data, phone identity, and control over the handset's Bluetooth function."
dr tech

Please Rob Me - 0 views

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    Can you believe this - major social and ethical issue and if this website can do it - then so can those burglars!
BOB SAGET

GPS Obsessed » Blog Archive » William Wales nearly gets blown away by F-16 fighter jets due to faulty GPS - GPS, Location-Based Apps, And Everything Else Navigational - 0 views

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    Dude almost dies from fault in a GPS
maxresnikoff

BBC News - Data haul by Android Flashlight app 'deceives' millions - 0 views

  • GoldenShores Technologies took ID and location data from the millions using its Brightest Flashlight app.
  • poor privacy policy,
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