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K Epps

Medieval Travel Guides - Medieval Histories - 0 views

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    "Wish to go travelling medieval style? Here is a list of books, which will tell you all about how people in the Middle Ages went about it

    What time of the year should you venture out? Which mounts should you choose? Or should you go by the sea? Where to cross rivers? What inns were safe? Where to find food? Anyone living in the Middle Ages had to have a good working knowledge of what was both reasonable and feasible. At a time when people had to move around in order to trade, to learn, to fight - or just to connect, practical knowledge about landscapes, food, hostile strangers and friendly hospices might often mean the difference between life and dead.

    Here is a list of books, which will introduce you to the field in general. Further literature may be found in the generous bibliographies, they are all fitted with."
K Epps

Italian city-states of Venice, Milan, Florence and Genoa (10th - 13th c.) - Medieval Times - 0 views

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    "The Northern Italian cities achieved wide autonomy by the end of 10th century and chosen their sovereigns or elected their own chief of state - the doge. Besides Venice that elected doges since 762, doges also ruled Genoa and Amalfi. German Kings who were weakened by the Investiture Controversy were unable to subdue the Northern Italian cities which gained great wealth during the economic progress in the 11th century and the period of Crusades."
K Epps

The Battle for Antioch in the First Crusade (1097-98) according to Peter Tude... - 0 views

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    "The Battle for Antioch in the First Crusade (1097-98) according to Peter Tudebode
    by DRM_PETER posted on NOVEMBER 21, 2013

    Peter Tudebode was a Poitevin priest who was part of the First Crusade, perhaps with forces of the count of Toulouse. He wrote his account, the Historia de Hieroslymitano Itinere, by at least 1111, which was after many of the other important accounts of the First Crusade were written. Tudebode offers some new insights into the First Crusade, including a description of the death of one of his brother's during the siege of Antioch. The following section begins with the Crusader army approaching the city of Antioch."
K Epps

The Presentation of the Franks in Selected Muslim Sources from the Crusades o... - 0 views

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    "The Presentation of the Franks in Selected Muslim Sources from the Crusades of the 12th Century 

    By Niall G. F. Christie

    Submitted for the Degree of M.Litt. in the University of St. Andrews (September, 1996)"
K Epps

The Crusades: A Very Brief History, 1095-1500 - 0 views

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    "Introduction: Between the mid-11th and late-15th centuries, an historically specific configuration of material and ideational factors gave rise to a constellation of religious wars that have come to be known as "the crusades". This constellation included Church-organized wars in the Holy Land, Iberia and along the Baltic frontier as well as within Latin Christendom itself.[1] The Crusades to the Holy Land were "wars of liberation" initially launched by the Church to restore Jerusalem to Christian rule. Following the First Crusade and the establishment of the crusader principalities (the County of Edessa, the Principality of Antioch, the County of Tripoli, and the Kingdom of Jerusalem - collectively known as Outremer), these expeditions were conducted primarily to defend the Holy Places against Muslim attempts at reconquest or, following its loss in 1187 and again in 1244, to recover Jerusalem for Latin Christendom. While authorized by, and fought on behalf of, the Church these wars were prosecuted by princes, nobles and knights from every corner of Latin Christendom as well as by so-called "para-crusaders" (milites ad terminum), and members of military orders such as the Templars, Hospitallers and Teutonic Knights.[2] They were fought primarily against a range of Muslim powers, although the Fourth Crusade ended up being waged largely against adherents to the Greek Orthodox rite. Although the idea of launching additional expeditions to liberate Jerusalem persisted for a considerable time, the Crusades to the Holy Land effectively came to an end with the fall of the last Christian stronghold in Palestine - Acre - in 1291.[3]"
K Epps

Medieval Sourcebook: Urban II: Speech at Council of Clermont, 1095, according to Fulche... - 0 views

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    "This text is part of the Internet Medieval Source Book. The Sourcebook is a collection of public domain and copy-permitted texts related to medieval and Byzantine history."
K Epps

It's too hot! I'm hungry! : The Challenges of Going on Crusade - 0 views

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    "It's too hot! I'm hungry! : The Challenges of Going on Crusade

    The journey to the Holy Land by crusaders was often a perilous trip. However, the biggest fear for many crusaders was that the climate would be dangerously hot for them."
K Epps

Jerusalem Explained - YouTube - 0 views

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    "Archaeology grad student Nir Ortal explains the brief 3000 year old history of The Temple Mount, one of the most important religious sites in the world."
K Epps

BOOK REVIEW: A King's Ransom - Sharon Kay Penman - 0 views

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    "A King's Ransom is the follow up to Lionheart and tells the story of King Richard I's imprisonment in Germany at the hands of Duke Leopold of Austria and Emperor Heinrich VI and of his battle to win back his Kingdom from his rapacious brother John."
K Epps

Story of medieval England 19/36 Richard the Lionheart and the Third Crusade -... - 0 views

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    "Story of medieval England 19/36 Richard the Lionheart and the Third Crusade" VIDEO
International School of Central Switzerland

Peter the Hermit: Straddling the boundaries of lordship, millennialism, and heresy - 0 views

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    "Abstract: Peter the Hermit: Straddling the Boundaries of Lordship, Millennialism, and Heresy demonstrates how eleventh and early twelfth century wandering preachers established millennial spiritual lordship over their popular movements. Peter the Hermit's Popular Crusade exemplifies this."
International School of Central Switzerland

God, Gold, or Glory: Norman Piety and the First Crusade - 0 views

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    The actions of a Norman knight, Bohemond, and a Frankish crusader, Raymond of Toulouse, exemplify this fact. The comparison of these two, as well as the rest of the crusade leaders, demonstrate that the Norman crusaders were driven by a complex and sometimes conflicting mix of pious and secular motivations, no different from their Frankish counterparts.
International School of Central Switzerland

Nomadic Violence in the First Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem and the Military Orders - 0 views

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    This study argues that in addition to protecting the kingdom of Jerusalem against perceived enemies from without, these strongholds are evidence of the military orders' involvement in policing nomads roaming within and traversing through the kingdom.
International School of Central Switzerland

Crusaders in Crisis: Towards the Re-assessment of the Origins and Nature of the "People... - 0 views

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    "The current paper surveys and analyzes the ecological and economic crisis of 1093- 1096, as the prelude to the First Crusade, chiefly in its "popular" form. The pestilence of 1093-1094, drought and famine of 1095 have increased the religious zeal and social violence of the popular masses in regions of Germany, the Low Countries and France. This combination has turned into the (failed) crusade. The collective behaviour of the crusading rustics reflects their economic distress, religious zeal and violent mood, at the same time."
International School of Central Switzerland

The Preaching of the First Crusade and the Persecutions of the Jews - 0 views

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    "The Preaching of the First Crusade and the Persecutions of the Jews

    By Shmuel Shepkaru

    Medieval Encounters, Volume 18, Issue 1 (2012)"
International School of Central Switzerland

Great Battles: The First Crusade - 0 views

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    "From 1096 to 1101, over 100,000 people from all over Western Europe set off towards Jerusalem. These men and women, these warriors and pilgrims, priests and nuns, lords and laborers, didn't have a name for what they were doing-no one would use the word Crusade to describe an armed pilgrimage, or holy military expedition, until more than another century had passed. Yet the battle that preceded their march, a battle along the way to Jerusalem, and still another after that city was conquered by a tiny remnant of the original force, combined to permanently reshape the nature (both spiritual and physical) of Catholic Europe. Dr. Jessica Goldberg, Assistant Professor, Medieval History, University of Pennsylvania, speaks at this "Great Battles: Moments in Time that Changed History" series lecture program."
International School of Central Switzerland

How parasites went on Crusade - 0 views

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    "The crusades were arguably the greatest migration event that took place in medieval Europe. In the 12th and 13th centuries, hundreds of thousands of Europeans travelled to the eastern Mediterranean on military campaigns, pilgrimage and to trade.

    "The crusades are often blamed for the spread of disease during the medieval period," explained Mitchell, whose work was funded by the British Academy. "But only limited research has investigated which diseases might have been spread, in which direction, eastwards or westwards, and what impact this may have had upon the endemic patterns of disease.""
International School of Central Switzerland

Siege of Acre (1189-1191) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 1 views

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    The Siege of Acre was one of the first confrontations of the Third Crusade, lasting from August 28, 1189 until July 12, 1191, and the first time in history that the King of Jerusalem was compelled to personally see to the defence of the Holy Land.[1] It was also the deadliest event of the whole period of the Crusades for the Christian ruling class of the east.[2]
International School of Central Switzerland

Siege of Acre - 0 views

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    In March 1191, the first corn ship to reach the camp outside Acre arrived. As welcome as the food was the news that Richard I of England and Philip II Augustus of France had finally arrived in the east. Philip arrived at Acre first, on 20 April 1191, but it was the arrival of Richard, eight weeks later on 8 June, that made the difference. Luck played a part in his success. Philip had spent his time building siege engines and pounding the walls, but it needed someone of Richard's military background and ability to energize the attackers.
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