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Salina V

Reading Comprehension and Technology - 29 views

Items that I have used for this is Google Docs. A co-worker and my self would work on tutorials and used this to incorporate technology in their reading. We learned that many kids prefer having th...

reading technology classroom

Jaime Villarreal

TechLearning: Involve, Prepare, Apply, and Develop: iPads in the Classroom - 14 views

    • Jaime Villarreal
       
      I can see how ipads in the classroom and assist teachers in differentiating instruction to meet individual student needs and allow for a more in depth understanding of skills and concepts building from each students different levels of mastery in certain skills.
    • R. Palomares
       
      I agree with you Jaime, Ipads in the classrooms can be very beneficial.
    • Joshua McDonald
       
      Jaime, I was actually given the chance to use a classroom set of iPads in the classroom last year as part of the pilot program. I can say from experience that it can be used for differentiated instruction, and it increases student engagement with the material. One thing the teacher has to make sure they do is actively monitor...the students are to good at getting to websites they are not suppose to be at if they know the teacher is not paying attention.
    • Sergio Perez
       
      Jaime, this is a very interesting article in how the iPad can be used for the special needs student. There are so many different apps available to help our students. It is important to make sure that the student is engaged with the lesson so learning can take place.
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    I am also a big supporter of tablets in the classroom, but I have yet to justify the cost of purchasing an ipad at $500 a piece. With budget cuts as wide spread as they are now, I would think a kindle, nook or even a nexus tablet for around half the price would work just as well. What students need is a dedicated e-reader and access to the internet to look up any information on the spot. Any of the above mentioned tablets could perform these skills without the premium price tag. Since most apps are now available on both the ios operating system and the android operating system, I would imagine the apps developed by speech and language experts are also available across platforms. The second issue in dealing with ipads is the familiarity with the product. Apple is the most successful and profitable tech company in the U.S. right now, but 90% of the computers in the classroom are windows based. Teachers will be more willing to utilize a tool if it integrates easily with the technology already found in the classroom. Ipad is a name. It is the most trusted and used tablet on the market. If, however, students can receive the same benefits of an ipad at half the price, I see no reason to limit the inclusion of tablets in the classroom to an ipad. Check out this article. It has some interesting comments by Bill Gates. http://macdailynews.com/2012/06/27/bill-gates-tablets-in-the-classroom-have-really-horrible-track-record/
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    This website gives the teacher background information needed when a teacher is planning on utilizing ipads in the classroom. It also details how ipads are beneficial for students with learning disabilities. It suggests for teachers to download applications that students can refer to when in need of help for core subjects.
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    Wow Jaime, this is a very interesting article about how technology is helping students with special needs learn. The IPADS has proven to be a good technology to support curriculum and instruction for all students. I liked how they are being used to enhance learning. The only state that is not using IPADS to supplement instruction in reading and math is TX but I think as more states across the U.S. are using them, we will be next in using IPADS more abundantly in our classrooms. 
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    Yes IPads are wonderful for students to use. Students should have the opportunity to be exoposed to all type of technology equipment. Through my program, we purchased Kindle Fires for the students to use when researching information and for other content area such as reading.They really love it and learn to navigated very quickly.
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    Great! I am certainly going to use this website if everything goes well with the grant writing. I have seen how teacher integrate their lesson and how students are totally engaged. We have to be able to keep up with all the emerging technologies and the generation of children that are in our classes. Try: http://www.interactioneducation.com/index_files/Best-Educational-Apps-For-iPad
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    I think iPads will be a great tool to integrate in the classroom. They will be more focused in what they are doing using these type of tools in the classroom.
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    This is awesome if we had iPads to supplement instruction in reading and math as well as to facilitate communication for students with autism spectrum disorders and others who require support through the use of communication devices. Students would be more engaged and would be able to collaborate. It would be a student centered environment where the teacher would guide the learning. Read this artlicle about ipads and how they are being used in the classroom. www.nytimes.com/2011/01/05/education/05tablets.html?pagewanted=all
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    This is a great article about how the iPad can be used to help the special needs student. One of the apps mentioned in the article can help the students with their reading. By having text-to-speech, the students can practice their reading skills while they read ebooks. There are also so many apps available that the students can benefit from using an iPad in almost any subject.
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    Jaime, the article sums it up using an appropriate acronym (IPAD) Involve, Prepare, Apply, and Develop to describe the innovating trend to expose student to technology. This technique is already being used in several states to allow students with communication difficulties to express themselves in group interaction using technology to enhance their education experiences. Very informative it puts techniques we are learning into perspective.
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    It is amazing how much technology is available to help students in the classroom. Integrating technology into the classroom enhances teaching and learning, yet it is now a necessity, even for students with disabilities. My question is, Are facilitators aware of how technology can be used in the classroom? It seems we are still lagging behind on the use of technology in the classrooms. Here is another article that touches points to consider when designing teaching and learning activities when integrating technology into the classroom: http://www.cput.ac.za/blogs/cel/2012/09/13/technology-for-inclusivity/
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    Jaime, I believe the use of iPads and other related Tablets in the classroom is great way to engaged students in the concept being taught. I like how this article detailed how the iPad can be implemented in the classroom to help students with special needs. Article: 7 Strategies for iPads and iPods in the (Math) Classroom- http://thejournal.com/Articles/2012/07/11/7-Strategies-for-iPads-and-iPods-in-the-Math-Classroom.aspx?Page=1
Elva Mendoza

Week 8 discussion - 38 views

I really enjoyed reading the article and definitely agree with the statement, "Yes, we can be afraid of technology," she said, "but I'm more afraid of what will happen if we don't use it." I just ...

technology classroom integrating

Isabel Cabrera

Deeper Learning: Defining Twenty-First Century Literacy | Edutopia - 22 views

  • Deeper Learning: Defining Twenty-First Century Literacy
  • problem solver, critical thinker, and an effective collaborator and communicator.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      Watch this video to see how this student defines deeper learning and how it has IMPACTed his life!
    • April Canales-Perez
       
      The video would be a great video to show students because it can be inspiring to them. He is from another country and he has struggled academically but he never gave up. I like how he picked a topic that has impacted his life and has experience in immigration. I like the name of his school "IMPACT" because I truely believe that school has impacted his and has allowed him to further his knowledge in a much deeper way than a regular school setting.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      I was also impressed with this school because it allowed the students to conduct their own research but still stay with the topic of government regulating laws. He chose a topic that was relevant and meaning to him: Immigration. He was engaged and learned a lot about U.S. laws.
    • Edna Orozco
       
      I saw the video, I was amazed on how the kid learn, this is a dream not only for students, but also for families and the education, Can you imagine to have schools working like this, hands on! where actually students learn and are engaged all the time!. Good article Isabel.
    • Juan Betancourt
       
      Problem Based Learning is a great way to take advantage of the interests the students have, it helps them take ownership of their learning and making it more relevant to them.
    • Dara Cepeda
       
      Wow that is something we should all consider, to create deeper learning through PBL. Very interesting to see how students can actually get engaged with a Project based lesson, it opens the door to understand problems and find possible solutions. It helps them to learn by using higher order thinking and at the same time it gives them the skills to be successful in their future career. Thanks for sharing that video with us Isabel :)
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      To Edna and Juan, I could see how pbl lessons could be incorporated especially at the high school level. I could see the students using their higher thinking skills and deeper learning taking place with such topics like this, instead of textbook and worksheets. I know that in your engineering dept at PHS, you are already incorporating skills at a higher learning for these students. I think our district has already started implementing deeper learning by having the Early College and Engineering Dept.
    • Jessica Burnias
       
      I think it is great how problem based learning is allowing to students to relate what they are learning to real world situations. This important they are being taught more than to just pass a test. They are using critical thinking skills and collaboration which are very important to be successful in the real world. Great video.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      Problem based learning allows for them to research on a topic that is meaningful and relevant to the student. It does allow for critical thinking and independent learning.
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    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      Are we preparing our students for the 21st century?
    • Adam Hovde
       
      It is hard to forecast what the 21st century needs from the students in school today. The smart phone was developed just a few short years ago and now it seems everyone has one and can use it proficiently. What technologies do we need to prepare students to use? What are we doing in class that students can take and use for the rest of their lives? These are very hard questions to answer. One of the "skills" I try and teach in my classroom is to make each lesson relevant to every student. In the video the student was able to do a project in his AP Government class that was relevant to him and he was able to find meaning in the project. Many students today can use their smart phones, tablets or PCs to help reserach, problem solve, critical think and collaborate. How do we as educators foster the desire in the students to use these technologies to do these things. It can be a big hurdle in some school districts that do not have the technology resources that other districts have. I do not think we can every really know if we are really preparing students for the 21st century but we have to give it our best shot and hope what we teach them carries over to the real world.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      New technologies are coming out every year with new and improved features. The best thing for teachers is to expose the students to what is available out there and make them comfortable with technology. I expose my students to a variety of technologies and sometimes they are just amazed at how I created it and I tell them that is it something I learned from one of my college classes. I encourage them to continue their education after high school if they want to live in a nice house and drive a new car. If you give them the tools, we will be surprised at what they come up with and maybe they will invent something new. It is our job to make learning relevant and meaningful.
    • Heather Luna
       
      According to the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, students must learn the essentials for success in today's world, such as critical thinking, problem solving, communication, and collaboration. As a fifth-grade teacher, I attempt to promote these elements, but am often unable to do so because of the spotlight on standardized testing and AYP. This year I planned on integrating PBLs in the classroom, but was informed that my students would be unable to use the computer lab and/or the COW for anything except a specific program. This was very disappointing, but I made the most of it. The problem is that even if this "program" is improving my students reading ability (which seems to be the case), it not truly preparing them for the 21st century. Students are losing the ability to think critically, solve problems, and collaborate. I am confident that if given the opportunity to integrate PBLs, I would see an even greater improvement in my students reading abilities, as well as, there overall abilities. We have to move forward, but getting everyone to "buy-in" is proving to be a difficult task! I found this video on "21st Century Learning" and thought I would share, it is long, but has some great information: http://youtu.be/zSNWr_QYyPw. Enjoy!
    • April Canales-Perez
       
      I don't believe we are preparing our students for the 21st century. Yes there is some teachers who will take the time and integrate technology into their lessons, but if administration doesn't support this then its very challenging to do this. We as teachers have a lot on our plate and we must make sure that students pass the state assessments. Teachers and administrators lose focus on what is really important and what our students need because of state assessments. If they don't see us doing passages or word problems then we aren't doing our jobs. I do agree it is our job to make learning relevant and meaning but will we ever be given the opportunity to do this. My students are always collaborating in class and applying the knowledge they have learned to real world problems. I challenge them to think and come up with their own answers and ideas instead of me doing it for them. I know there is much more that I can do, but its a start.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      To Heather & April: The "STAAR" test I hear is very higher order thinking. It makes the students think outside of the box. The students have to analyze and internalize the data or read the stories very carefully because there are two really good answers. Unfortunately, we have a large number of students reading below level that we are trying to catch up those students. We can only try to do our best to integrate technology into the classroom.
  • Being literate means one who is advanced at reading, writing, speaking, and listening.
    • Georgina Salas
       
      Now should we add computer literate as well? Since this is the way we are heading. Plus the students will eventually be STAAR testing in the area of technology.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      As new technologies are coming up, I feel that teachers and students should "keep up with the Jones." The more you are familiar with computer features the more comfortable you will be with computers and be able to adapt to new technologies. A lot of the web 2.0 tools we have been using are similar in some ways. For example, Spicy Nodes and bubbl.us are very similar tools. It is just a matter of exploring! The creativity in students will come out as they incorporate new tools into their projects. In addition, everything is now online..college admissions, financial aid, housing, and work study.
  • (National Council of Teachers of English), twenty-first century readers and writers need to: Gain proficiency with tools of technology Develop relationships with others and confront and solve problems collaboratively and cross-culturally Design and share information for global communities to meet a variety of purposes Manage, analyze, and synthesize multiple streams of simultaneous information Create, critique, analyze, and evaluate multimedia texts Attend to the ethical responsibilities required by these complex environments
  • But for all the amazing, valuable stuff on the Web, there's loads of misinformation, half-truths, and misquoted, useless stuff. In preparing children to be literate in today's world, it's urgent that we teach the skill of scoping websites with a critical eye. Kids need to be explicitly trained in spotting everything from blatant pseudo-facts to slightly questionable content. This ability to "filter" will be required of them in both university and work.
    • Cora Mendez
       
      This is so true. We need to teach our students how to use the information that is out there on the web. However, we must also teach them how and where to look for reliable data on the internet. They need to understand that not everything that is on the internet is true.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      We do need to educate our students that not everything on the web is valid, just like commercials that are just gimmicks or have a "catch" to it. We need to teach them how to look for credible sources and that anyone and even them can write something on the Internet and that doesn't mean that it is true. There are even pop ups or emails that can invite viruses or can sell your emails for scams. It can be dangerous if the wrong people get a hold of your personal information.
  • It's true that, through deeper learning, many teachers and schools are already guiding students into this new century well-equipped to think critically on their feet, problem solve, and communicate effectively.
  • It's not about the actual tech - it is about the skills needed to get accurate information.
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    21st century learning skills: problem solving, critical thinking, effective collaborator and communicator
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    Are we preparing our students for the 21st century? Are we using Deeper learning by activating prior knowledge and experiences? Are the students internalizing information, researching, analyzing, generalizing material beyond the content?
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    I enjoyed this video. It showed how someone not from this country chose to educate himself and look into the laws for immigration because he went through the experience. I feel that if anyone saw this video it would push them to do more with their education. I believe that if elementary, middle school, and high school students saw this it would inspire them to care more for their education and purse higher education than a high school diploma.
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    We need to bring this reality into our classrooms, our students take too much for ganted, but it would be even more effective if we give them a real life driving question that involves our students helping immigrants like this one get the education they so desire. Through a pbl driven lesson, students will come up with solutions, thus helping them truly understand the problems of this particular students. Perhaps we can teach empathy as well.
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    I really like the video and what they were talking about and the determination it take to educate oneself. If everone on a campus could take the time out of there busy schedula and show this video to the students it would make a difference in how they see themselves and there education.
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    I enjoyed the video a lot. It is inspiring to see how students are engaged with a PBL lesson. Students were finding possible solutions to problems that pertain and are significant to them. If students feel that the problem affects them personally they will try their best to find answers to solve the problem. By using PBL students will also acquire the skills needed to be successful not only in college, but in life.
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    I'm glad I work at HCISD, we're quite progressive when it comes to education and Project-Based Learning is getting a lot of attention and many efforts are being made to ensure that it's happening in our classrooms. I really liked the video especially the part on how the student made his assignment have value as immigration issues pertain to him. I think we're in the right place at the right time.
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    I thought it was interesting that it was a Pbl school. It was very obvious that the student was getting a deeper understanding of the topic. He was not only learning about immigration because he had to do some research and figure out where and how it was addressed in the laws and government. He was problem solving and using critical thinking which allowed him to have a deeper understanding of his topic.
Alyssa Tanguma

The Nerdy Teacher - 12 views

  • Using My iPad In The Classroom This Year
    • Joshua McDonald
       
      This is actually one of a series of posts he has done on his experience with iPads in the classroom. That was how I first discovered him, a google search for iPads in the classroom. Hope you enjoy it as much as I have.
    • R. Palomares
       
      IMPORTANT!!!! The Nerdy Teacher is a Diigo bookmark shared by Joshua McDonald but I don't know why it says it was shared by me when I just added a sticky and highlighted in response to this post.
  • Blog Archive
    • Joshua McDonald
       
      Impressive history to look through if you have some free time.
  • My Visitors
    • Joshua McDonald
       
      As you can see his influence is global!
    • Sara Aldape
       
      Wow!!! Talk about him tailoring specifically to his audience and to Global Influence teacher needs. IMPRESSED!!!!
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    • R. Palomares
       
      "The First Five Minutes" is a very good blog entry that will help you change the way you start class.
  • How do you start your class?
  • I found something very interesting after looking at my classes for about 6 weeks. The first five minutes set the tone for the entire class.
    • Sara Aldape
       
      I start my class by having student interaction....them recapping with friends and them asking me questions about myself. They start feeling comfortable and I try to make it a friendly environment. When you have kids feeling appreciated you will have learning and collaboration.
    • Joshua McDonald
       
      That is a great point @Sara Aldape
    • Yadira Flores
       
      The Blog here says something that is very true as humans we have the need to socialize, and students have those needs also. Another thing I know from my experience is that if students fell that we care enough about them they will start caring about you too and as result perform fro you.
    • Joshua McDonald
       
      Couldn't agree more with that statement...that is why I usually dont get into curriculum during the first couple of weeks of my class. Instead I work really hard to develop a relationship with them. One of the best things I have seen is making sure I learn their names fast. It is sad to say that there are still teachers on my campus that dont know many (if any) of their students' names.
  • I have learned so much about my students from talking with them and sharing ideas.
  • One of the new things I have brought to my class this year is Student Blogging. Now, if you are a regular reader of this blog, you are thinking that blogging is nothin new to my classroom. Well, I'm having students do something a little bit different this year.
    • Jaime Villarreal
       
      I agree that the first five minutes of class of very crucial in establishing the tone of the class. I have noticed that when I spend the first minutes of class interested in there dailly activities there is always smooth transition of their attention to my planned activities. Would like to share the following website: http://www.techlearning.com/index
    • Sara Aldape
       
      I loved the fact that we do need time to talk and socialize because we need to catch up on things. Have students share ideas and having them collaborate with their collegues the first five minutes will encourage them all to be able to feel a part of the class and not just having a teacher centered environment.
    • Sonia Aldape
       
      Joshua, after reading The Nerdy Teacher blog I found myself reflecting on the different technology that is being used at my campus. Although, we are try to keep up with technology it seems that much more can be intergrated to enhance student learning. Thanks for the exposure.
  • One of the things I'm doing with Evernote this year is having students use it as a way to store all of their work in class. I am slowly rolling it out this year because I'm asking my students to learn many different tools and I do not want to overwhelm them
    • Alyssa Tanguma
       
      I really like this idea. It seems it would work for any classroom. I agree that many of the students haven't seen each other in a while. I dont know about you but when I was in school, it never failed for something to happen during the passsing period that I could not wait to share with my Peers. Great Idea.
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    As someone who wants to be a leader in their district for technology implementation, I believe one of the best things I can do is keep myself plugged into a Professional Learning Network (PLN). I dont have to figure out everything on my own....it is much simpler to steal other people's ideas :). The Nerdy Teacher has been my go to source for examining how others are using technology in the classroom, and I highly recommend making him a part of your PLN.
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    Your assignment for this week is to complete the following: 1) Check out the Nerdy Teacher's blog and post a sticky note on the website with your general impressions. (Please know that you are welcome to be as honest as you like, even if that does not agree with my thoughts on the website) 2) Via comment to this conversation, please suggest another blog, twitter account, website, etc... that would also be worth adding to a PLN. Hopefully by the end of the week there will be a good foundation for anyone looking to start forming their own PLN.
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    Joshua, "The Nerdy Teacher" is an awesome blog where many ideas and things to think about are discussed. I really liked the most current blog posted titled, "The First Five Minutes". In this short blog, the educator makes a interesting discovery about allowing the first five minutes of class for students to "chat" and "catch-up", it helps with students getting ready to learn. This is so true, because we as adults do the same thing when we're getting ready to start a staff development meeting. We first "chat" for a little while and then we seem to ready to begin learning after that. As for another blog that would be great to add to the PLN, here is one I suggest: http://www.edweek.org/ew/section/blogs/index.html It has a more than 40 blog links of everything an educator may possibly want to know and comment about! Check it out for yourself!
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    @ R. Palomares Thanks for the recommended website, it looks like a great resource.
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    @ Joshua Thank you so much for sharing this blog. I think I'm addicted. Someone should recommend him turning his blog into a book. I completely fell in love with his "The First Five Minutes" blog post. I am an inclusion/co-teacher and the two English classes I'm in are very different. We usually do "Do Now's" in both classes at the beginning. One, excuse my language, is very anal about starting as soon as you walk in and the other is more laxed. Lets a couple minutes pass for the student to get mentally prepared and then goes about completing the warm up, which I find is more effective. Again, great post! Another great blog I came across is: Thinking in Mind, http://www.thinkinginmind.com/ It goes in detail about the power of networks.
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    Joshua, great link. 1. I posted my sticky note on the site and shared it with the group. 2. The blog/site I'm recommending is called, The Innovative Educator - written by Lisa Nielsen. She has great ideas on how to use technology for learning. The following link takes you to one of her blog's post named, The 5 Cs to Developing Your Personal Learning Network - http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/08/5-cs-to-developing-your-personal.html. Hope others enjoy her blog as much as I do.
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    Great Link! Lots of information.....this article that I'm recommending is called For 'Connected Educator Month,' Tips From 33 Educators We Admire By KATHERINE SCHULTEN. http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/08/01/for-connected-educator-month-tips-from-33-educators-we-admire/ These 33 educators have shared and answered two questions: 1. What is one important thing you've learned from someone in your Personal Learning Network (P.L.N.), however you define that network? 2. What one person, group or organization would you recommend every educator add to his or her P.L.N.? They share lots of recommendations....hope you enjoy.
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    Enjoyed and very interesting. I start my class by showing them a image on the projector and posting a question on the board. They will collaborate among their groups for about 5 minutes and then have a discussion among the class. The images are connected to the objective of the day. I would recommend to get pictures from any website such as flicker.com or google.com
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    This blog has many posts to read. It is helpful to read what technology another teacher is using in the classroom. He does mention different technology tools to use in the classroom that are new to me. This is a blog that I will continue to read for new ideas.
Ruth Garza

Students Using iPads for Education | KRGV.com | CHANNEL 5 NEWS | Breaking News Breaking... - 6 views

    • Ruth Garza
       
      I agree Jaime!! Students need to have the necessary technology, like ipads or diifferent kinds of tablets/readers, to take advatage of the benefits of the many applications students may use. Principal Martinez, of Stillman Middle School in Brownsville, understands that students are living in a new era of technology. Students are responding well and feeling optimistic about their future. Ipads are definitely useful tools and allow students to collaborate and discover new ways of learning. Many educational sites for tutoring and wonderful videos may be the key for their success. I'm glad that a school here in the valley is taking the initiative to make a difference in the students' lives, regardless of all the misconceptions or negative responses that many people, including teachers that are stuck in their ways, may have. Check out the news report from Channel Five!
    • Alyssa Tanguma
       
      LOVED this article. So many people are against iPads in the classroom. They haven't taken the time to fully view and do their research on the benefits it can provide. I would love to get a class set. I am an inclusion teacher and we are going to be reading a book as a class and it would be great to have the kids read on that instead of the traditional book.
    • R. Palomares
       
      Wow, This is great news for Stillman Middle School students in gear up. The IPAD has many features that I know the students are going to love to learn and use. This partnership between Apple and Region One was a great opportunity to help students expand on their knowledge using Technology. They will also be better equipped on their knowledge of technology tools.
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    Stillman Middle School students were issued ipads as part of the GEAR UP program.
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    This is a great way to teach, being able to have all your students working interactively while you teach. I am still hoping we get some in our district. I feel this will really help my students get motivated in their reading which will eventually help their comprehension.
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    I enjoyed reading the article of Mcallen I.S.D using IPADs in their classrooms. I was a permanent sub at a middle school in McAllen and the middle school did not have IPADs but other campuses did for edcuational purposes. I heard students would log into edmodo for school assignments using their IPADs. However I also heard of numerous stories of students pawning the IPADs for money and parents being involved with the pawning scam. It's a huge risk to take investing in IPADS for students to use because of parents and students that might misuse the device.
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    I agree with Mr. E.J. Martinez, Principal of Stillman Middle School. Technology is a very powerful tool. If used properly in the classroom it can catapult participation, learning and creativity. It will give students the opportunity to access information and visit virtual places. The possibilities are endless and the sky is the limit.
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    WOW, thats great that Stillman were issued IPADS. IPADS or any other equipment such as KINDLE FIRE are very useful for our students in our district. Like it was mention before, technology is a powerful tool so our students need to have the access of any equipment that is out there for them. Great News!!!.
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    Its great to see that more and more schools are implementing technology into the classroom. It would be great if every district had enough money to issue out educational technology tools to the students (iPads, tablets, iPods) as an instructional resource in the classroom. Here is a link to how Weslaco is providing teachers training in technology to help 21st Century learners excel with the technology they're already used to: http://www.themonitor.com/mvtc/news/article_1f614f22-122c-11e2-83e4-001a4bcf6878.html
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    I don't believe people are completely against it, i believe it's the fear of NOT KNOWING how to use it in the classroom. I'm totally up for using the ipad. I've currently started using REMIND 101. WOrks awesome. One way communication that's safe from teacher to student/parent that reminds them about certain activities or important reminders. Check it out!
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    We recently were asked to fill out a survey within our district explaining why or why not to implement the use of IPADS in the classroom. Of course, I am all for it but I was surprised to see the many educators who are reluctant and don't feel it is necessary. I am already planning what to do with mine if the district decides to suit us with a class set.
Maria D. Martinez

More Colorado Districts Saving Money with 4-Day School Weeks | Education News - 10 views

  • The savings come mainly from reduction in support staff, maintenance costs, food service and transportation which allows schools to retain teachers and academic programs that would have to be dropped otherwise
  • It is the parents who typically have the most difficulty adjusting, with most schools reporting negative parental reactions due mostly to increased child-care expenses for the fifth day.
  • In addition, after one year into the three-year experiment with the new schedule, another unexpected benefit popped up: an uptick in test scores. Webb thinks that the increased “sense of urgency” of the shortened week seems to encourage teachers and students to make every hour in the classroom.
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    This website gives an insight of what Colorado districts are presently doing: 4-day school weeks. Are we headed that way?
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    Maria the article is very interesting. I think it can benefit our district because our district is very short on funds.We get directives of turning of the light or computers when we are not using it so the district doesn't pay too much money. In all programs, our budget have drastically gotten cut in funds so maybe if we have a 4 day instead of 5 day we can save money. Also teachers would love this because it would give them a break so they won't get burned out with all the changes in our district. Imagine it can be a three day weekend :)
  •  
    This is very interesting. As a teacher, I would like to move to this 4 day week schedule to enjoy a three day weekend every weekend; however, as a parent, if I were not employed by a school district and worked at a regular 5 business day week, then I would be upset at the inconvenience it causes. I would have to pay extra money for child care services as stated in this article. So although this 4-day school week has its pros its cons also have to be weighed out by those that would be affected. I guess a positive would be that it would create jobs in child care for the fifth day. As an educator, by day 5, I am out of gas. So I can see how working digently throughout the 4-day school week proves to be similar in test scores when compared to those of the 5-day school week.
  •  
    Maria D. Martinez, this article poses an interesting thought about maybe going to this measure if budget cuts continue, but I don't think were headed that way. The 4-day school week seemed to have a positive effect with this Colorado school district because their state testing scores seemed to increased according to this article. On the downside, the district only saved $150,000 which isn't very much considering the amount of time and effect one day can have on education.  I think that the 4-day school week would be an interesting challenge that everyone will adjust to easily if there's a need to implement it.
  •  
    I agree with the districts that implemented the 4-day school week in order to save on the operational costs. I believe that having a short week will motivate both students and teachers to work harder and more focused on the tasks needed to be completed knowing they will have a three day weekend to get ready for the next round of intensive work days. Difficult times call for difficult measures and thinking outside of traditional methods will allow us to meet the ever changing demands of a society struggling with an inconsistent and unpromising economy.
  •  
    I did read the article and this is true that the school district did save a huge amount of income for having four day school weeks. However if you decide to have a four day school week somewhere along the line school districts still have to meet about 187 days of school, so we would be taking a risk of shorter summer vacation or shorter vacations. But hey looking at the data I am for it, but just shorter vacations.
  •  
    There's been rumors that school districts here in the RGV would do this if the budget crisis got worse, but I have yet to see it happen. There are many other ways that the school districts can reduce costs, however if they did go into the 4-day school weeks and extended the school days, then I guess there would be no difference. Like the article states, it would mainly affect the parents because of child-care expenses, but maybe this would make parents value their childrens' education more, because unfortunately there are many parents that see school as free daycare and as long as they can leave their kids there 5 days a week while they are at work they don't care about anything else. Whatever it is that school districts decide to do to reduce costs will work only if they have a good plan in place along with a good backup plan.
  •  
    I agree with Victoria. Viewing this article as a parent/teacher would have two different outcomes. We (the U.S.) are already behind in Education. We seem to be cutting funding in the area we are the most weak in; education. If we struggle with students learning the material in a 5 day school week and retaining the information over a two day weekend, how are we suppose to have them grasp and retain in 4 days? I don't believe having a 4 day work week will motivate teachers and students. I believe it'll make it worse. I vote NO.
  •  
    Once in a while you will hear in the news how the students from the United States compare to those in other countries. The Center for Public Education wrote an article about how the amount of time of school affects our students. They compared top performing countries to the United States and they were unable to find a correlation between less school time and lower test scores. The article also states that some high performing countries have their students spend less time in the classroom than the United States. You can find this article at the following link: http://www.centerforpubliceducation.org/Main-Menu/Organizing-a-school/Time-in-school-How-does-the-US-compare I know at my school district, teaching positions have not been filled because of the budget. Although the savings for a four-day week may be small it is still a savings. The parents that work will be having to look for daycare. Some of these parents are barely making it and this additional cost could be too much for their budget. There are many pros and cons from the four-day school week for the schools and parents. If the school has the funds then I would favor the school week to remain at five days.
  •  
    Maria, an article worth looking into especially with all the cuts in all departments at our district. Within the district we have been trying to conserve energy but that will only go so far. The state has really reduced the budget for our district which makes it tough therefore, they should consider the 4 day work week. Students would love this as well as teachers. On the other hand, parents would probably say NO.
  •  
    WOW!!! Kids would be estatic, but that would mean parents would have to look for babysitters. Since parents have to work because of the economy, it would be very difficult. But for those that are stay home parents it's a plus. Do you think it would really help the districts? How do parents feel about it? Here is another article about it. http://www.gjsentinel.com/news/articles/kids-try-to-fill-extra-day-off-with-4day-schook-we/
  •  
    I think it is awesome that districts can think outside the box and find alternative ways to save money for the district and try so hard to keep their personnel without sacrificing the curriculum. I have been reading up on school districts that are saving money by eliminating bus routes. I think that is another great idea, not only to save money but it helps students, parents, grandparents get their daily exercise. Here is on of the articles that talks about it: http://www.activatenoblecounty.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=75:walking-school-bus-can-save-money-lengthen-lives&catid=3:latest&Itemid=16
  •  
    Well, I think the idea of having a four-day week has its benefits. The district would help save money by eliminating hours of energy used in the classroom. That in itself could save thousands of dollars by the district. The money saved could be utilized in other areas. Here is a link to some creative ways other districts are utilizing to save money. http://www.mamapedia.com/article/creative-ways-to-cut-expenses-in-a-school-district
  •  
    I think that districts here in the valley are far from moving to this 4-day school weeks. It would have to be most or all of the school districts from around here in order to work more effectively. There will be a lot of unhappy parents due to child care expenses. On the other hand, us teachers will probably enjoy it. As it is most of us already stay late hours at school everyday to finish up. The districts will have to show how much they are saving by doing this and at the same time maintain or improve scores.
  •  
    I read the article and I believe the 4-day week has its benefits but as well it has its downside. I believe at the end the positive benefits will outweigh the downsides. If any district is going to implement the 4-day week, the district has to have the parents and community behind them if they want the system to work. I can see how having a 4-day week will have a positive effect on test scores, because the students and teachers will make every hour count for instructional time, knowing they only have 4 days to teach the concept within the week. I can also see improvement in attendance with students and staff, now parents and teachers can schedule their appointments on the off day during the week. Article: http://crosscut.com/2012/02/16/education/21873/The-fourday-school-week-why-less-really-is-more/ A superintendent in Oregon explains the reasons why a shift to a four-day school week works well for students, teachers, and families. Start with better academic performance.
Cora Mendez

Technology and Young Children | National Association for the Education of Young Childre... - 6 views

    • Cora Mendez
       
      The video is at the bottom of the page. I know it is long, but you can skip ahead by clicking on the arrows. Very good information for early childhood teachers. Make sure to listen to slides 27and 28.
    • Cora Mendez
       
      There is a Pdf document if you wish to read instead of listening to webcast.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      I went ahead and viewed the whole web cast and it was so good to see Mr. Rogers. I remember watching him all the time as a young child and I was always so excited to see what he was going to teach us about next. He educated us about train stations, using videos. He did role playing with his puppets to engage us by asking and answering questions. He was one of the founding fathers of integrating technology for early childhood learning. The NAEYC is right about integrating technology in preschools but doing it in an effective way to educate children not just for passive entertainment purposes.
    • Cora Mendez
       
      Isabel you are right Mr. Rogers was one of the first to integrate technology in early childhood through his show. Children loved it. I remember watching it with my kids. Most of the programs they have in the computer labs for early childhood now a days don't challenge our prekinder and kinder students. We need to move away from that. My prek students use Twiddla in the classroom, and they will ask me to share the screen so they can collaborate with their partner on another computer. These little ones are like sponges, and they will learn just about anything especially technology.
  • When used intentionally and appropriately, technology and interactive media are effective tools to support learning and development.
  • Intentional use requires early childhood teachers and administrators to have information and resources regarding the nature of these tools and the implications of their use with children.
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    • Cora Mendez
       
      For years I have heard people go back and forth about whether using technology with youg children is good or bad. I was glad to finally learn the answer from NAEYC.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      Now I think technology is more kid friendly than before. I see children more often exposed and engaged to technology through the use of IPADS. The applications are easy for kids to download and play. Even with the use of these new smart phones, kids take them away from their parents and play games. I remember my son being 2 years old and learning how to work the vhs/dvd player to view his favorite Disney cartoon, "The Lion King." He learned so fast that he would turn it on so early in the morning by himself. I was so amazed.
    • Cora Mendez
       
      Isabel, you are right. Children learn how to use technology very quickly. Just like your son. If it is something that intrigues them, they are quick to learn it.
    • Edna Orozco
       
      I totally agree that technology has change tremendously and is more user friendly nowadays, specially for kids, but I agree that sometimes certain hands on activities go better without the use of technology, for example, I have seen some applications for painting where the student has to select the colors and type of brush, I rather have my kid experiencing this activity with water painting than with an ipad for example. Therefore I believe that depending on the purpose of the lesson I would think about using or not technology.
  •  
    If you have ever wondered what NAEYC stand on use of technology and early child hood education is, you must listen to this webcast. Have you wondered if using technology in early childhood was DAP(developmentally appropriate practice)? Listen to find out.
  • ...11 more comments...
  •  
    Lower grades are always the last ones to get new technology if they do get any at all. Why do districts or administrators think that the upper grades are priority? Is it because they are the testing grade levels? Don't you think that if we were to teach children how to use technology since they were in pre-kinder, then they could do so much more in depth projects when they were in the upper grades instead of learning how to use it in the upper grades. What is your take on this topic?
  •  
    Cora, the bottom line is that the upper levels get tested, and the results dictate our very jobs. If there is anything I have understood is that "we" are all important components of a school, but when it comes to testing and results, step aside because the upper grades are priority. It is what it is, but as a teacher, I know that every grade level lays the foundation....and a strong foundation is important.
  •  
    Cora, I think the lower grades should have access to technology, just as the upper grades. I recently read an article that concluded that children as young as two can utilize an iPad as an educational tool, much like they use blocks and play dough. Touch screen technology has eliminated the need for children to "have" to learn to manipulate a traditional keyboard and mouse. In addition, young children are "sponges" that can absorb and achieve much more than we give them credit for. I see how the focus tends to be on the upper elementary, and primarily because of testing, but I have learned that as educators, we have to learn to be more proactive as opposed to reactive.
  •  
    Heather, I agree with you, and I include our early (PK and K) childhood in all iPad activities, and they all get to handle one by themselves with help if needed. They can at least get the manipulation and navigation under their belt, by the end of the year, they are savvy. Children cultivate 85 percent of their intellect, personality and skills by age five. This is what crosses my mind when I meet a child who has never been read to or even talked to. They have so much to learn. See the article below. http://www.wccf.org/pdf/brain_dev_and_early_learning.pdf
  •  
    I like the point that Roberta Schomburg makes about how technology integration is everywhere today. It's not just confined to the computer labs anymore. The students should have access to technology in the classroom on a daily basis. I wish I could say that this is a reality in our campus but it is more of a rarity.
  •  
    Heather, I totally agree with you that young children are like sponges because I get to see it everyday this year in my pre-kinder classroom. Unfortunately in my classroom we only have one teacher iPad, but I let my little ones use it every chance I get. When I first got the iPad, I was surprised that they knew more about it than I did. I teach them how to use something on it, and they pick it up write away. I am always looking out for my little ones and asking for more technology whenever I can. When I moved into pre-kinder this year I asked for a document camera and projector. Last years teacher did not have one, but I was going to make sure my kids had access to the use of those tools. My children enjoying using them. I have one little boy who says, "Mrs. Mendez I want the scream." He means to say he wants me to project something onto the screen like a game, movie, book etc. They enjoy using technology. It makes things more engaging and fun to learn.
  •  
    Ana, that is so awesome that you allow PK and K to use ipads. In our school only 5th graders got one and one for every teacher. You are right if you teach them the basics when they are young, they will have that under their belt and can progress from there in another grade level. Thank you for sharing the article. It is a good reminder of how critical their first 5 years are for learning. This is why I don't understand why they make PK only available for low income people in so many places. How does this affect our middle income and high income children when in comes to them not receiving a whole one year foundation on the basics of learning. I would never have believed that Pk students are capable of so much learning if I had not seen it and experienced it for myself. They are amazing learners.
  •  
    Mr. Rogers; I loved his show, although it was right on for that era, this newer generation requires a different approach which is the use of today's technology. They seem to on board and very knowledgeable with iPads, apps, and games out there. Although I have very little experience with Pre-K and Kinder, I am aware that they are an even better target to incorporate technology with. I think as teachers, we might want to set our standards a little higher with our students, especially the little ones and be ready to be surprised on what they know and can do.
  •  
    I can understand the concern over age, but we witness the use of technology from our Pre-K and Kinder on a daily basis. I firmly believe, that technology enhances children's cognitive and social abilities, when used appropriately. Especially when we set the goals and introduce digitial citizenship early on.
  •  
    From a technology standpoint, there are more apps available for students in the lower grades than for the higher grades. From a personal stand point, even my three year old can use the ipad and iphone for seeing videos and playing games. If I were an administrator, I would start deployment of an Ipad/Ipod program in the lower grades.
  •  
    Juan I wish more administrators would think like you. I think that technology integration in the lower valley is still in its early stages, so in time I think lower grades will get more technology and more programs will be available to to cater to lower grades. I know the apps are there, but we the the hardware. My document camera and projector were borrowed because they needed it to tutor the upper grades for STAAR. I have had to manage without it. I have two desktops and my laptop and my ipad in my classroom as far as hardware goes.
  •  
    I love Mr. Rogers. I have shown my son many of the episodes when he was younger. I can definetly see how technology could be used with the young in teaching. I can also so how, like many of us, technology is not always in teh classroom to help when it is needed. I would like ot see more uses for technology with smaller children and how they learn from it. We have years of data on teh old way of teaching children maybe someone can come up with research on how technology is enhancing or hindering education in children.
  •  
    The video was long, but very informative. The word intentional kept coming up in the video and you used two quotes that included the word as well. Intentional use is so important. I've mention on other posts the use of sites the District subscribes to. The students enjoy these and they benfit from them; however, I feel there could be more intional uses that are much more benficial. The position statement clearly outlines the benefits of integrating technology not only in schools, but in every day life. The statement presents this in such a way that really shows the resposibilty (tremendous challenge) educators and care givers have to young children in order to empower them with this knowledge and skills and nuture the whole child. I agree more administrators and teachers - educators in general - don't emrabrace the importance of technology. Perhaps this position statement would help them.
Edna Orozco

Games rewards and educational applications - 6 views

  • The popularity of video games is not the enemy of education, but rather a model for best teaching strategies. Games insert players at their achievable challenge level and reward player effort and practice with acknowledgement of incremental goal progress, not just final product
    • Lupita Sanchez
       
      Juan I agree with your statement on how video games is not the enemy of education. Video games IF used properly can assist students in an educational way. Video games as well as other techniques have been used to help students learn. However, as students use methods they are familiar with. As teachers we must challenge ourselves to learn in the same method to provides students real and authentic experiences. Very good statement.
    • Juan Betancourt
       
      Another point to make is that there are similarities between pbl and educational gaming, in both the students take ownership of their own learning. The difference is probably that the game would have to be more involving for both the teacher and the student. The concept of points or levels would be also more acceptable to students rather than a rubric (clam total in Whyville).
    • Dara Cepeda
       
      True, video games are not the enemies, they actually help the student to learn in an engaged and fun way. Students are used to video games. Their world is almost virtual and they know every little move when it comes to video games. Why not let them learn in their language? We, the teachers, should learn and explore this "new" methods of learning through video games. In fact we should create a video game at the end of a unit so students can review for the test. They would be more engaged in the learning.
    • Edna Orozco
       
      I've read about some games that I can use in math, 1) LURE OF THE LABYRINTH: LABYRINTH is funded by the U.S. Department of Education with a primary goal of enhancing pre-algebra mathematics learning, and a secondary goal of improving literacy. 2) MOLECULAR WORKBENCH provides interactive, visual simulations to aide in teaching simple and complex science concepts, such as dynamic molecular structures. 3) SIMCITY: the objective is to design and create a thriving, sustainable city. 4) STARLOGO: The programming possibilities are seemingly endless, and numerous teachers in math and science have created an array of applications with it.
    • Cristina Pintor
       
      When used properly, games are not enemies of education, on the other hand, they may enhance the lesson and provide opportunity to participate in challenges that at the end will improve students' mastery of the objectives.
  • n humans, the dopamine reward response that promotes pleasure and motivation also requires that they are aware that they solved a problem, figured out a puzzle, correctly answered a challenging question, or achieved the sequence of movements needed to play a song on the piano or swing a baseball bat to hit a home run. This is why students need to use what they learn in authentic ways that allow them to recognize their progress as clearly as they see it when playing video games.
  • The motivation to persevere is the brain seeking another surge of dopamine -- the fuel of intrinsic reinforcement.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • When learners have opportunities to participate in learning challenges at their individualized achievable challenge level, their brains invest more effort to the task and are more responsive to feedback. Students working toward clear, desirable goals within their range of perceived achievable challenge, reach levels of engagement much like the focus and perseverance we see when they play their video games.
  • Gamers reportedly make errors 80% of the time, but the most compelling games give hints, cues, and other feedback so players' brains have enough expectation of dopamine reward to persevere.
  • The games require practice for the specific skills the player needs to master, without the off-putting requirement to repeat tasks already mastered.
  • One way to help each student sustain motivation and effort is to shift progress recognition to students themselves. This can be done by having students use a variety of methods of recording their own progress toward individualized goals. Through brief conferences, goals can be mutually agreed upon, such as number of pages read a week (with comprehension accountability), progression to the next level of the multiplication tables, or achievement of a higher level on a rubric for writing an essay.
  • I've found that for students who have lost confidence to the point of not wanting to risk more failure, it is helpful to start the effort-to-progress record keeping and graphing with something they enjoy, such as shooting foul shots or computer keyboarding speed and accuracy.
  • Compared to an adult brain, a young brain needs more frequent dopamine boosts to sustain effort, persevere through challenges and setbacks, and build the trait of resilience.
  • As students use visible models to recognize their incremental goal progress, they build the executive function of goal-directed behavior.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      How I incorporate games into my curriculum? Well for my 2nd graders I use Brain pop and Brain Pop Jr. to elaborate on my lessons and have them take turns (popsicle sticks) answering the questions on the online quizzes. They love it because they are engaged with the cartoon animated videos and at the same time reinforcing the objective that was just taught.
  •  
    How can you incorporate games to your curriculum? What are the rewards you could use? What are the results of lesson mastery and engagement when using games?
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  •  
    Definitely video games aren't the enemy, if anything, I think it's one of the greatest educational models that allows application, analyzing, and even synthesizing of skills. It makes peer tutoring possible, it allows participant take control of their learning, and is one of the greatest intrinsic motivators around. If anything, we should be jealous.
  •  
    Great article, and with the fact that "Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that, when released in higher than usual amounts, goes beyond the synapse and flows to other regions of the brain producing a powerful pleasure response" that alone is the motivator for our young children. I concur that a student is highly motivated with any and all video games, but as with everything else there are cons. An educator must progress monitor and individualize instruction, eventually teaching our students to monitor their own progress with their assignments and get that dopamine feeling for achieving those goals, as they do when they reaching certain stages in a game. I believe that video games are very popular, and definitely a motivator for any lesson. I incorporate the use of iPads to stimulate their learning by assigning research or having students listen to a video (in lieu of direct instruction) then follow directions to complete an assignment. The mere fact that they are taking the iPads and gravitating to their favorite place in the library on their own, is a strong motivator in itself. The results are that they are excited, and that assignments are completed fairly quickly. They are not "bored"
  •  
    I myself am a life long gamer. I try and incorporate games into my lessons when I can. The hard part for students sometimes is when to put the game down and get on with the lesson at hand. Some students get fixated on a game and can not put it down and then their studies suffer. I would like ot learn more on how to insert more games into my lesson.
  •  
    I've read about some games that I can use in math, 1) LURE OF THE LABYRINTH: LABYRINTH is funded by the U.S. Department of Education with a primary goal of enhancing pre-algebra mathematics learning, and a secondary goal of improving literacy. 2) MOLECULAR WORKBENCH provides interactive, visual simulations to aide in teaching simple and complex science concepts, such as dynamic molecular structures. 3) SIMCITY: the objective is to design and create a thriving, sustainable city. 4) STARLOGO: The programming possibilities are seemingly endless, and numerous teachers in math and science have created an array of applications with it
  •  
    I have used some of the following games to enhance the lessons: 1. The Cisco Binary Game for them to practice in computer the translation between decimal numbers and binary. I'm currently holding a contest on who can get the top score to get some extra credit points. 2. The Cisco Packet Tracers is an interactive game in which they guide their character as he battles in cyberspace to get from destination a to b. 3. Whyville will be used the way we used it in class. Experiment with different games to earn clams. Ultimately the clam total will be the basis for their grade. 4. City One is game that shows how to sustain a city that faces different problems. 5. http://www.arcademicskillbuilders.com/games/ Site for elementary games. 6. Timez Attack a program for using addition, subtraction and division. 7. http://tux4kids.alioth.debian.org/index.php Typing, Math and Paint free programs for elementary and Jr. High kids. 8. Webonauts is a game that can be used for elementary and Jr. High students to introduce them to media literacy and citizenship
  •  
    One way I use gaming in my classroom is by using the program Study Island. This program incorporates games online with concepts my students are learning in the classroom.
  •  
    Juan, I would have to begin by saying that I am a firm believer in "playing to learning" and "learning by playing". Whether I incoporate a technology game or a traditional game, I am always "playing" in my classroom. I love to see my students get excited about learning and that is exactly what games do, they build excitement! The online games I utilize are endless, but here is a brief list: *internet4classrooms.com: a variety of games, lessons, and interactive white board activites for all grades levels. I usually allow the students to select a game of their choice that is related to the content being taught. *iknowthat.com: a variety of games. I assign a particular game and allow the students to play individually or in pairs. *mathplayground.com: great games and videos to reinforce math concepts *neok12.com: great list of science videos and games. I usually project the videos and then allow the students to participate in a corresponding game using the whiteboard. *mangahigh.com: great math site. The games are very engaing and provide the students with a challenge. *reflexmath.com: excellent way to build math fact fluency *spellingcity.com: an excellent source for practicing spelling words In closing, I would have to say, that my students really love the "Fling the Teacher Games", so I frequently search for them online and use the whiteboard to play them in the classroom.
  •  
    On the subject of traditional games, this past semester I created some bingo (chalupa, loteria) playing cards to introduce computer parts to the students. They loved it and were really entertained by it.
  •  
    Games can be a great resource to education. What is the best though is when AAA publishers get involved. The Valve game company recently put out an educational version of its popular Portal game. Making the game itself free to teachers and students along with tool to create new puzzles to teach math and physics concepts. www.teachwithportals.com
  •  
    Think Through Math is one site I use for indivual games. My students really enjoy Hooda Math and I use Brainpop's game for the whole class. I can definitely see the instrinsic reward system going on. They want to do well to "win", they're having fun and learning in the process. Some of the sites the District subscribes to (Stemscopes, ICORE, Think Through Math) track student mastery. I am able to set up lessons that include instruction as well as games and set a mastery level that must be met before going on to the next level. This is a great help. Regarding traditional games - bingo is still a big hit and a great way to reinforce multiplication, division, vocabulary, etc.
  •  
    How can you apply the gaming concepts to your curriculum? Can you reinforce or make the lesson completely a game? What about grading the results of playing an educational game? What options are there out there for you that you can apply today? What have been the results in student involvement and engagement?
  •  
    Thanks everybody for sharing such great websites. I will start using some of them with my students.
Yadira Flores

What you can actually DO with an iPad - From Beth on Edudemic | Leading Change in Chang... - 1 views

  • What you can actually DO with an iPad – From Beth on Edudemic Oct 2nd, 2012 Leave a comment Posted in: Beth Holland, What Does Change Look Like?, Why Change? Online, in workshops, and even with friends, I frequently get asked What can the iPad actually do? as a sort of challenge to the worth of the device. I would rather that they ask, What can y
    • Yadira Flores
       
      This is an awesome article. It would be a lot of fun to be a reading student in school if my teacher would of implemented using an ipad or just technology in lessons. I think technology can really change how many of us not just students view reading.
  •  
    I love the way the question is asked by What can I actually do with the Ipad verses What can the Ipad do. Like any other type of technology tool, it is not useful if we don't understand how to utilize it. This article is great and has many inspiring ideas on how to utilize the Ipad especially if you are Reading Teacher. Awesome Website...
  •  
    I like the answers that are provided by Beth Holland regarding "Why iPads and Why Technology? So students can communicate in complex and modern ways. So students can make their thinking visible.
  •  
    Yadira, IPADs are awesome and their uses in the classroom can be uncountable. I like the format of this article/website because it provides the Learning Objectives, Projects, and a Video. I liked the one titled, "I want my students to master the concept of the story arc." Don't forget to check out the video! This is a great resource to share with others! Thanks for sharing!
Pedro Torres

Response To Dr. Butlers Question - 41 views

In our campus we are starting to use Kindles in the classroom. We will issue out the Kindles to the teachers this year and the 3 MTT teachers will provide trainings and strategies to implement the...

technology butler allsemesters

Ruth Garza

IDRA - Attrition and Dropout Rates in Texas - 6 views

    • Ruth Garza
       
      We are losing way too many students because 1 of every 4 students are dropping out of school.
    • R. Palomares
       
      Ruth, these drop out rates are alarming. I specifically found interesting but alarming the information that mentions that Texas schools are losing 13 students per hour. Wow, that means that in an average day, 91 students drop out. I think that we have a great job ahead of us in developing ways to diminish those drop out rates and create classrooms where students feel the need to want to stay in school.
    • Santos Alvarado
       
      Ruth great article, its very shocking to see the drop out rates in Texas alone, and to know that another 2.8 million students are going to dropout in the next 25 years. I would like to know how Texas stacks up against other states, even though we have more schools and larger population, do other states have a similar rate/avg as our state.
    • vincent briseno
       
      My daughter and I were just talking about this the other day. She was writing a paper arguing for year round school. Here is a similar article she used as a resource. The information is very eye opening. http://www.texastribune.org/texas-education/public-education/prepaing-texas-student-college-struggle/
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    Hey Ruth I was shocked to read about the dropouts rates for Texas. I ask myself, why are so many students dropping out every hour in Texas? We need to make learning fun for these students not to drop out and graduate from high School. Alot of these students get to much pressure of the state test that it turns them off from reaching their goals and graduating.
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    At my school district. Edinburg has a campus that helps students graduate from high school because of increasing drop out rates. Majority of students drop out because of numerous reasons, examples; pregnancy, parents, jobs, peer pressure, jail ect. School districts should open up a campus that help students graduate on credit recovery. Even getting a G.E.D is better than nothing, but yes I do agree the drop out rate has increased over the years.
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    It's so sad that lots of kiddos are dropping out. Many of them give up because they can't pass the state test and many of them just don't have the support at home. It's amazing how many students we are losing.
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    Ruth great article, its very shocking and sad to see the drop out rates in Texas alone, and to know that another 2.8 million students are going to dropout in the next 25 years. I would like to know how Texas compares to other states, even though we have more schools and larger population, do other states have a similar rate/avg as our state.
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    This article is so scary, why are we losing so many kids and why don't they see the tremendous challenge they have ahead without an education. I personally see some of my students that have fallen between the cracks and unfortunately I can make a prediction that he/she will probably choose the wrong path. It's really sad but I believe our education system doesn't allow us to teach anymore and therefore we have lost track of the purpose of learning. The majority of our students are economically disadvantage and it seems like school has become a burden because all we talk about is the importance of passing those test.
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    It's hard to fathom the drop-out rate of our students. From my observations, it's around the middle school level where students lose internal motivation. Many students already know the system and what grade level they have to make it to for their parents to be okay with. I believe it may be a mixture of their hormones and the choice of poor friends that lead them down the wrong path. As an educator, it's hard to motivate these students when we're up against their family telling them, don't worry, do what you want, I don't care. I'm not saying all parents...just a few of the parents who don't care themselves. If they don't care to better their lives, why should their kids? It's hard. We're faced with the parents who are receiving assistance and their kids know that all they have to do is get through 8th grade. After that, they too can stay at home and receive assistance.
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    Great article to read and digest in everyday that we send our kids to school to get an education. The drop-out rate speaks to the high volume of students that lack guidance and motivation to succeed in life. I am proud to be a part of a program at my campus that offers an alternative for students to regain their credits. The program we use is the A+Plus program where students are placed to a lab classroom environment and are given the opportunity to regain their credits. This program has helped our campus reduce the drop-out rate and increase graduation ratios. Thank you for the article. Blanca.
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    I agree with the comments that other students are making regarding this alarming situation. We need to make learning fun and engaging, but how can we do this? If every time we try to incorporate technology in the classroom we are reprimanded because they think students are just playing.
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    Great article...It is very alarming on all the information that was given. I have incorporated technology into my everyday lessons so I could keep my students engaged and wanting to learn more. Teaching should be fun and unfortunately due to state tests some teachers just teach to the test and put the pressure to the students to pass the state tests.
Crystal Martinez

EdTechTeacher | Professional Development for Creating 21st Century Student-Centered Lea... - 15 views

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    This site has various resources that an educator can use in the classroom to incorporate technology in their lessons. After viewing the website, what are some of the areas that you found interesting or beneficial for your field of expertise?
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    Great website. I'm actually having to present to the math department on how they can incorporate tech. into their classroom this week. This site is great to show them!!
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    This is an excellent website. I really like how it is set up to suggest web 2.0 tools according to what your learning goal is for technology implementation. It highlights key points about the website and rates its ease of use level. It organizes the Web 2.0 tools according to its purpose. For example, if I would like for my students to create books, magazines, posters, or newsletters online, this website simplifies my options by providing me with useful information on Web 2.0 tools that are available to accomplish this goal.
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    Thanks for sharing this website I will definitely have it as a resource to guide me in the implementation of technology into my lessons. My favorite part of the website is the table of technology tools with a description, example and level of difficulty. The method of organizing tools in a table allows me to have tools in an accessible format that will motivate me to use them rather than spending valuable time looking for resources and information on how to use them in separate places. This website provides additional tutorials as well that can provide guiding tools in the implementation of technology. I have also found very useful the following website: (http://education.ti.com/calculators/pd/US/Online-Learning/ ) from Texas Instruments that provides not only ready made lessons that implement technology but also free webinars to learn methods of implementation.
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    Wow, The way EdtechTeacher.org is set up is very user friendly. The different tabs towards the top make navigation through this site very easy. There's something here for everyone, from teachers to school leaders who are looking for ways to incorporate more technology in their campus. I really liked and found interesting the tab that reads, "Teaching with Technology/Innovate projects & Lessons". There I was able to find numerous ideas of lessons and projects using technology. This provides a valuable resource to look into different project ideas. Great Website. Thank you for sharing! Also check this website out when you get a chance. (http://www.p21.org/)
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    Awesome, I definitely like this site: (http://edtechteacher.org/index.php/teaching-technology/tech-tools) there are lots of student friendly links in which students can use to integrate technology in their assignments. Teachers can also get ideas so that students can integrate technology using awesome graphic organizers. This website has on site links to go to on technology tools which are very user-friendly. Thanks for sharing! Check this website, there are awesome technology tools which teachers can use in the classroom. http://www.superteachertools.com/index.php
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    This website has so much information! I like that it invites teachers and administrators (Professional Development Services/Leadership and Change Tabs) to contact them to come to their campus or district to help incorporate technology to the curriculum. It has numerous links for teachers to use, and shows how technology is being used in innovative ways in the classrooms. I also like that it gives students' excerpts on actual projects and lessons that have been done. It gives really good explanations and justifications of the use of technology in the classroom. In checking out the various sites it gives, I came up with this one that I really liked http://www.4teachers.org/. Check it out, it gives you many resources for your classroom, and the blog section gives you many more websites that are very useful for teachers in all levels.
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    This particular site is perfect. As a reading language arts teacher I am constantly looking for ways to enhance my lessons and make them hands on. I found the Digital Storytelling ideas to be extremely useful. I have personally utilized the Comiclife and Storybird in my classroom. By using Comiclife, my students were able to create their own comic strip stories for a Figurative Language lesson and they were able to bring there lesson to live. I have also used Storybird and this is a great way to make the students bring their own creative writing to live. They are able to go through the writing process and be able to share their published work with others from all over. Love this resource...
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    What a great website! Thanks for sharing it with us. I loved the fact that it even breaks it down into questions and you can click on the question and it will give some suggested links. I've used storybird before and the students loved it! I also found some digital story telling websites that I have never seen before. Check this link for more additional resources http://www.pbs.org/teachers.
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    Wow! Impressive. This is a great website for teachers learning how to use technology in the classroom. I especially like the article called, "Beyond the Classroom with iPads & Mobile Technology". Integrating what interests our students such as ipads and iphones will provide opportunities for higher participation.
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    This is a great website. I like how this website provides a variety of resources that educators can incorporate in the classroom. I like how this website provides different publications and articles that teachers can access to learn how to teach using multimedia. http://edtechteacher.org/index.php/news-a-media/publications I also like how this website offers teachers to register for free webinars on how to implement iPads and other mobile devices in the classroom. And also provides recorded links of past webinars through blackboard. http://edtechteacher.org/index.php/news-a-media/webinars
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    This is a great website with a lot of information. It has many resources for us educators to integrate technology in the classrooom. thanks for sharing!
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    Very first place I checked out on the website was the article on the 5 mistakes people make when using iPads in the classroom, and as someone who had this opportunity last year I can say I made most of those mistakes :) Great resource for those looking to improve technology implementation on their campus.
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    This website has so many different areas to choose from. I mainly looked at the math links and I found Real World Math. Real World Math is a website where you can find helpful lessons. Some of the lessons also deal with project based learning.
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    I found the area of Teaching for 21st Century interesting because it states that successful integration in schools requires on going staff development. In addition, it has information on a cohort program that teachers are invited to get enroll in order to learn more about technology.
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    This site is well rounded full of very interesting links that can help in different content areas. The areas of interest are the core subjects in my 4th grade level. It will be a great asset to the many sites in my library.
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    It provides a lot of resources for teachers. One of the resources that it provides and that I think it's very helpful is the webinars.
Diana Cedillo

Technology Impact on Learning - 8 views

  • Children did not become social isolates. ACOT classes showed more evidence of spontaneous cooperative learning than did traditional classes.
    • Diana Cedillo
       
      How did technology encourage cooperative learning in this Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow project?
    • Leonila Pena
       
      I believe that having access to technology whenever they needed it gave the students the ability to go beyond the walls of the classroom. They didn't have to rely solely on the teacher as their learning resource. They had the tool to explore the world from their own home and the opportunity to become creators of their own learning. Through their research they most likely found other individuals that had the same interests as they did, people with whom they could share what they knew and also learn from. Many students become more confident when they see that others have interest in their work, it makes them want to show others what they know and help others enabling them to work more cooperatively with their peers.
  • The studies showed that ACOT students wrote better and were able to complete unites of study more rapidly than their peers in non-ACOT classrooms. In one case, students finished the year’s study of mathematics by the beginning of April. In short, academic productivity did not suffer and in some cases even improved.
    • Diana Cedillo
       
      According to this study, do you think that our students in our classrooms would have the same results if we presented them with computers as they did in their program? If so, what would we do or how would we follow this program with limited funding on technology?
  • Nineteen of the ACOT students (90%) went on to college, while only 15% of non-ACOT student sought higher education.
    • Diana Cedillo
       
      How has technology encouraged students to pursue higher education?
    • R. Palomares
       
      Technology encourages students to take more responsibility for their own learning. In addition, it creates a different attitude toward learning because they now act as active participants in their own learning. This is good information to share with other teachers. Thank you for sharing.
    • Diana Cedillo
       
      Yes Palomares, I agree it does encourge a student-centered learning environment. A direction we all seem to be moving towards.
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    • Diana Cedillo
       
      Is technology making a positive impact on education? If so, how?
    • Joshua McDonald
       
      I believe technology is doing what is has always done, making things happen faster, which for the most part I would say is a great thing. Specifically in education you can find a wealth of information for research in a very short amount of time, papers are easier to type then write, learning can be more individualistic, and I will stop there. So I can see lots of positive impacts in the education setting, but I can also see concerns. For instance I have noticed that for the most part my students lack the necessary skills to stop and think through a situation or a problem. If it takes to much time to solve, most of them will give up. They are used to getting things quickly. I do think the the positives outweigh the negatives in this instance.
    • R. Palomares
       
      I agree with Joshua, technology is indeed making a positive impact on education. There are more students using a wide variety of programs that motivate them to do better in school. Programs such as Stixty have given the students the opportunity to do book reports in a fun and interactive way. There are numerous of other examples that demonstrate how technology is making a positive impact on education. It's making positive impacts on how we (educators) collaborate and share relevant information through programs such as this social bookmarking website(Diigo).
    • Santos Alvarado
       
      I have to agree with Joshua and Romel, that technology does have a positive impact in the classroom. I believe technology increases the student's motivation and self esteem to learn, because they are using tools that they are use to, not just paper and pencil. It makes the students excited about coming to school. I teach 5th grade students, and when I receive the students they lack the basic knowledge how to use Microsoft word and PowerPoint, but once they leave they learn how to use stixy, and glogster for presentation purposes. I believe technology in the classroom creates a positive environment for learning and collaborating with one another.
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    I think if the students get this opportunity to have a computers, they would have more access to get more resources for their studies. On the other hand, students need to be monitor when using computers to make they are using them effectively and not getting into websites that would get them in trouble.
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    This is a great study on the positive effects of technology. I can see how it could have been so successful, like any other type of program or project, consistency is the key aspect. Any type of technology that is going to be introduced into the learning setting will be effective if the accountability and full cooperation is clearly stated prior to making the commitment. This is something I have seen as an educator that becomes an issue because as Title 1 districts I am sure funds are available for Ipads or any other tablet that might be more affordable but the way things are implemented is a big aspect of how productive you will be. Many times we begin something and not follow through, I think that implementing any time of tablet into the learning process in our school is a great way to enhance learning as long as we set goals to meet and accomplish. Great information thank you for sharing.
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    Marivel, I agree that districts and campuses have to be committed when introducing and executing the use of technology in the classroom. I believe errors in success occur when there's no consistency in using a technology in the classroom. Students are always more engaged. For example, this week, I did the story plot with my students in class and we retold the story of Prometheus using Toontastic ( I believe that's the name of the app) and my students were glued to the screen. It's a FREE app I encourage teachers to use. It provides the visual in the story students need so they can recall events in the story.
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    Learned alot from this study!! It's amazing how much influence technology has on students. When I read that 90% of the students who were using technology went to college compared to only 15% of the non-tech students, I was shocked. It puzzles me how many school districts are not willing to make the necessary expenses to attain this same achievement. The school drop-out rate is sky rocketing here in the valley. I posted a link to a Texas drop out report. Check it out! http://www.idra.org/Research/Attrition/
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    Thank you for sharing the FREE app on recalling events in a story. I will try it tomorrow and hope to have great results just like you. Thank you.
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    Technology is a great way of getting our students more engaged in our lessons. It was surprising to read in this article how the students in the ACOT program were college-bound unlike the other students in the same high school. Students are able to use technology to collaborate. I feel students might feel more comfortable sharing their ideas with one another through the use of technology.
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    I have to agree with Joshua and Romel, that technology does have a positive impact in the classroom. I believe technology increases the student's motivation and self esteem to learn, because they are using tools that they are use to, not just paper and pencil. It makes the students excited about coming to school. I teach 5th grade students, and when I receive the students they lack the basic knowledge how to use Microsoft word and PowerPoint, but once they leave they learn how to use stixy, and glogster for presentation purposes. I believe technology in the classroom creates a positive environment for learning and collaborating with one another.
Lucero Martinez

eInstruction - INTERWRITEPAD - 2 views

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    I had the pleasure of utilizing this in my classroom for a few years. I was able to walk around the room and make sure my students were on task without having to skip a beat of teaching. It allows you to use drawing, writing, and typing tools. It wirelessly connects to to the laptop through bluetooth technology and then the laptop is connected to elmo, and projector. You can capture an image of what you are projecting through your elmo and highlight, write notes, or draw on it, and you can save it for later use or print out notes for your students. You can also log on to the internet and it becomes your pointer, you can manuver through the web, freeze a page and write notes on it and save it. If you ever get a chance to work with one you will love it, I did! I miss it dearly because, unfortuately, the laptops at my campus are out of date and I haven't been able to successfully connect it to my current laptop which works when it feels like it. Now there's a new version out called Mobi Interwrite pad and I read that there is an app for the Ipad (not sure how the Ipad is connected to projector). But it is a technology worth looking into!
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    I was hoping this was something that I wouldn't have to pay out-of-pocket. I did see how you mentioned there being an app for the ipad. I'm goign to look into that once I log-off. I have "checked out" the ipad for a few weeks and apparently, the other two on campus have yet to be checked out. I believe teachers are having difficulty in how to use them in class. I on the otherhand have been trying new apps, programs, and reasons to keep the ipad in my classroom. LOL
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    Lucero, this "Interwrite PAD" seems like an awesome idea to have. The ability to teach interactive lessons from different places in the classroom would be great! The best part is that it comes with the software ($249) value. The battery life on this technology is also incredible. Up to 40 hours of continuous use without recharging it. That's a whole week! Having and using this "Interwrite PAD" would be awesome. Thanks for sharing!
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    Lucero, I wish all campuses had the luxury of devices like the Interwrite PAD. Interactive lessons would work out best if students had ease of access instead of being restricted to a certain area of the classroom. This device seems to be able to provide engaging activities for the students and I would jump at the possibility of having the opportunity to incorporate the Interwirte IPAD into my lessons. Hopefully our school districts will continue growth in technology and purchase these devices for educations everywhere.
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    Lucero, my school district has purchased an Interwrite Pad for all of the elementary teachers at my district. I have been able to use it for the past three years and find that it keeps my students engaged in the lessons that involve the Interwrite Pad.
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    Wow! this is something my students can really gain from especially in my reading class. We are in the process of purchasing IPADS for our students and we are all looking forwards to it. Thanks for sharing.
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    This is an excellent equipment for all teachers to use in their classrooms because you can actively monitoring your students while you teach your skill. Also another benefit for gthis interwrite pad is that a students can also put his or her response to the question being ask by the teacher. Great information. Thanks for sharing.
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    I know Mcallen I.S.D have issued students I-pads to use in the classroom. Here at E.C.I.S.D they have been assigned to teachers and us teachers have been using i-pads in our daily lessons. On my I-pad i have a remote desktop option for students viewing my work on the I-pad on the projection screen. Very neat tool and I feel that I-pads are very useful in teaching than a textbook.
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    Great classroom technology equipment. I recently purchased an iPad app Whiteboard which gives you similar tools as a whiteboard but on your iPad and you project the information wireless to your computer and projector. Its very useful when you need to walk around and check on students and still project information to the rest of the class.
April Canales-Perez

If Technology Motivates Students, Let's Use It! | Edutopia - 4 views

  • I believe many students are bored and unmotivated because of the way they are being taught, with heavy reliance on reading textbooks, memorizing facts and figures, and listening to lectures, over and over.
    • April Canales-Perez
       
      This is true for students who have teachers teaching to the test. Students are not motivated to learn because they are not engaged in meaningful learning. What do you think?
    • Cesar Mata
       
      As a STAAR testing teacher this year I sometimes feel ashamed to admit that I feel like we have no other choice than to "teach the test." With so much pressure on us to get the students to pass we often resort to what we know works, and that is drill and skill. So yes, I agree that students lack motivation and how can we blame them?
    • Janice Wilson Butler
       
      Good insight - I think it is what most of us resort to. It is a shame that the "powers that be" don't see that this is happening.
  • Technology in its many forms is showing how teaching and learning can paint with a much broader palette of colors, from images and music to games, simulations, wikis, and many others, any time, any place, on laptops, desktops, and smartphones.
  • Today's students find this new world of digital learning to be very motivating.
    • Dara Cepeda
       
      Sometimes as educators we don't understand administrators when they constantly remind us to motivate students and teach them with new tools, but at the same time they contradict themselves when they expect you to teach specifically from C-scope. Luckily, there is no C-scope for my teaching subject, Art, but I see the stress of my colleagues when they want to try something new, and then the administrators getting after them for not following C-scope. Students need to be taught in their language..which is technology and multimedia tools.
    • Cora Mendez
       
      I like that Dara:" to teach them in their language" because this is what they know technology.
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    • April Canales-Perez
       
      How are you motivating your students to learn using technology?
  •  
    Teaching to the test can be BORING and un"motivating" for students. If we would teach the TEKS, using a variety of strategies and techniques, including PBL and technology, I believe students would be in even better prepared for lifelong learning. In many ways, I believe teaching to the test inhibits how far we take our students. I think the bottom line here is...planning is vital.
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    With all the new legislation in the state house and senate hopefully we can get away from so much testing. With many of the new bills the state is taking away the number of state tests the students will have to tak but they will still have to take some tests. Hopefully this will give teachers more "wiggle" room to teach more interactively and engaging. Most of our students know more about technology than we do. We should be using it to reach them.
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    As a second grade teacher, we still have a little "wiggle room" to incorporate fun reading graphic organizers and fun mini projects for science and social studies. It is getting to the point that our 3rd grade teachers want us to do what they are doing (paper & pencil), but I disagree because with 7 and 8 year olds, they still need the phonics, visuals, and hands on to learn and stay engaged. They have a short attention span and are still developing.
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    It seems that transitioning from no technology to technology really gets students motivated and excited, however, they also expect guidance if not they'll just play games. Incorporating technology inot what we already do does make a huge difference in student motivation and participation. I will add though that school can still be exciting even without technology, it's just a lot harder.
  •  
    As a first grade teacher, I have the opportunity to introduce and implement technology. My students are not interested in using the textbooks, but prefer the online texbook and interactive avtivities. Students at this young age are eager to use technology and hands on activities.
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    All I can do is allow more opportunities in the library with the use of iPads so that the younger students are exposed to devices and apps. For older students, I made sure I covered digital citizenship, evaluating websites, and introduced credible research databases, to lay a foundation for our teachers. Our teachers are very strong, and they are always on task, but many time are limited for all the reasons we all know, lack of tools, time, etc.
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    I agree students are bored and unmotivated with textbooks and lectures. I think teachers are too. I really like the comment that technology can paint with a much broader palette of colors. That's a great way to look at it. Technology definitely brightens lessons I've tried to inegrate technology into as many lessons as possible; however, not nearly as much or in the way I'd like to. Right now my students are working on Prezis. They are creating a presentation on an ecosystem and they're loving it. The lesson actually called for a diorama - the shoebox version. The Prezis have been a huge hit. Also, technology is integrated in to Health lessons by teaching Internet safety - this is an on going lesson with several sections. Our District subscribes to several sites (Aha Math, Think Through Math, Aha Science, etc.) we use in centers or all together in a computer lab.
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    It is really hard to motivate certain students, but I'm doing my best to get them ready for college or a job. On a separate but related note, I make a point to tell them that not everything will be to their liking and they'd better be ready to produce.
  •  
    I agree with all of your comments. It is extremely difficult to motivate students when as teachers we are limited to our teaching strategies and overwhelm with the pressure of having to pass the STAARS test. We are limited with resources. Yet, we must learn how to use technology and learn how to motivate both our students and teachers. Give them a new resource a new way of teaching..
  •  
    I agree that we should use technology to motivate students. They look forward to a story, game, video, drawing tool etc. using technology verses pencil and paper.
  •  
    I for one love technology but also love lectures and insight from experts. To me it is not always about hands-on and group work. I guess I am a bit of an introvert in that regard.
Edna Orozco

Replicating Success: Project-Based Learning | Edutopia - 7 views

  • The more innovative a school and outstanding its results, the more impossible replicating it looks to educators elsewhere who are struggling with challenging student populations, limited resources, and unimaginative administrations.
    • Edna Orozco
       
      Do you agree with this statement? Is it true that we feel frustrated because we might not have the financial support, the adequate technology, or students willing to learn?
    • Juan Betancourt
       
      It is not impossible to replicate pbl. The problem is coming up with a project using the existing tools and resources as well as spending the time to develop it properly, you just can't "wing it" like one of the teachers says in the video.
    • Dara Cepeda
       
      I disagree with that statement. I believe schools that have all the necessary tools and technologies are outstanding with their results because they provide everything for the educator to teach. In other words they are saving time for the educator, they just have to concentrate in teaching and applying those tools. While teachers who work in a district without all of these sources, have to dedicate time in finding solutions, tools to implement in their lessons. In other words they have to be creative enough to be able to use their "limited" tools in numerous ways. But it is not IMPOSIBLE, if the teacher has the vision and dedicates time to create pbl lessons, or engaging lessons, it will have outstanding results with their challenging populations. It is challenging but not impossible.
  • The original textbook-free, nonprofit, public charter school
    • Edna Orozco
       
      It looks difficult even for educators to think that it is possible to teach without following a book, on a public school, and yet to get an engaging environment for students. Are you ready to move on from your comfort zone, and start planning with other teachers to implement PBL on your classroom?
    • Cristina Pintor
       
      Although it would be challenging, especially in schools where technology is limited and/or obsolete, if teachers have the determination to implement a PBL lesson, they will find ways to succeed. It will be particularly difficult for teachers that are reluctant to change and are not used to the use of technology; but everything is possible, especially if administration is committed to support the teachers.
    • Isabel Cabrera
       
      I read somewhere in the article, where we must move beyond the old textbook and worksheet type of teaching and have more problem based lessons that are more relevant and meaningful to our students lives. I teach 2nd grade and I use a lot of graphic organizers and the students seem to remember the vocabulary words when we incorporate hands on by drawing pictures and giving them time to write their own sentences. Problem based learning is much like a few years back where thematic units were part of the curriculum. It will be a lot of work for the teachers to come up many activities, but I think the students will better benefit from this type of instruction.
    • Heather Luna
       
      I agree with Cristina and Isabel. Integrating PBLs can be challenging but they are so beneficial. I think it goes back to expectations. Students will do what they are expected to do. If we expected them to merely read a book and answer some questions, then that is what we will get. If we expected them to think critically and produce an end product, then that is exactly what we will get. We have to take our students to the next level by setting the bar high (even if we have to step away from our comfort zone)!
  • You can have high expectations for all your students. You can involve presentations and critiques and involve students in work that real adults do. There are no barriers to that, only perceived barriers."
    • Edna Orozco
       
      Are you willing to treat your young students as adults, and give them such responsabilities, even if you are teaching elementary or middle school?
    • Lupita Sanchez
       
      Students need to be prepared to face real world situations. All of our district campus are not equip with the correct technology. However, it is not impossible. Teachers can prepare PBL lessons to allow students to think critically and engage students with real world scenarios and hands on activities. Nice article.
    • Adam Hovde
       
      One of things I alwys tell parents is that we are raising our kids to be adults. I teach high school and when parents ask me why I give students so much responsibility I always answer with how much is too much responsibility? My students are 11th and 12th graders and they are going off to college in a year when should they start being academicaly responsible? I push my students because I now in college it will be hard transition and I do not want the academic responsibility to be part of the transition they have to go through. Many students come back and thank me for the challenge I gave them in class. It does not always work with every student but I try and challenge every student in my class to take responsibility for their own education.
    • April Canales-Perez
       
      I believe this will be an adjustment for some teachers including myself. I think with more practice and the proper training it will be easier to let students run on their own and be responsible for their own learning.
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    It is a very difficult move for many educators,especially with so much at stake with testing and higher expectations; however, pbl is the implementation of life skills for students. Technology does not have to be a part of it all at once. Teachers can build up with mini PBLs, then gradually add devices, and expand on the choices of projects. Once the students understand the process, then give them more options. Preparation and professional development must be in place. TEs have mini pbls, so designing can happen later, when teachers feel comfortable.
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    I recently had an opportunity see a presentation on project based learning at TABE and was surprised to see that administrators at schools here in the Valley were encouraging its use. From what I could tell, PBL was something that teachers were trying to incorporate. It's nice to know that administrators are jumping on board too instead of requiring teachers to "teach the test." It seems like all of the educators in the video are thrilled about PBL in the classroom. I would like to see that enthusiasm in more districts across the valley, especially mine.
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    PBLs are a reflection of real life. Groups consist of different personalities collaborating to reach the same goal. The driving question is one that solves a real life problem, and is also be presented to a live audience. Students will be responsible for their portion of work after they sign the contract. Teachers guide students, but don't getme wrong, careful planning must be done in order to implement this successfully. I agree with Lupita, we need to make our students more independent, especially at the foundation level (elementary and middle school). That has always been the objective in my classroom, and I can see the benefits five years later.
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    I disagree with this statement as well. I think overall schools have everything, and then some, of the necessary technology accessibility, resources, and personnel to make make education a wonderful endeavor. Personally, I think schools sometimes give issues unrelated to learning too much attention and focus is sometimes lost. I think the same goes for parents and even the students. There has to be purpose in what we teach and in what students learn and until then -- good luck.
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    I like how at the end they remind us that there is still room to improve. Technology is nothing if not dynamic. We need to remember that as soon as we have learned something new, to go back and find something else and never be complacent.
Isabel Cabrera

IPAD Technology in the Classroom! - YouTube - 10 views

  •  
    Great idea using an IPAD to create a poster to reflect the understanding of a book.
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    ...and then some, having I-Pads in the classroom is an awesome resource and with a little creativity -- student tend to forget that they are learning. This is a good video, but the example is only the heel of the technology mountain regarding the endless possibilities of I-Pads in classrooms. Happy hiking.
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    The issue is finding ways to enhance the curriculum using technology. A great example would be to use augmented reality books that can bring scenes to life using devices like the iPad. Test some of the apps that might be useful for your curriculum, select a few and let the students use them.
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    I started using an IPAD to teach with in September. I love it. Many of my students bring them and they pass them around so everyone acn use them. The IPAD is a great teaching aid but you have to develop a lesson to use with the IPAD. You can not just give teh students and IPAD and say learn. It takes a lot of self control from the students to not just surf around the web.
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    I have been using the iPads all year in the library, and I agree with Juan. Using devices is just like implementing other materials and/or resources. There must be a plan in place which derives from an objective that must be learned. iPads certainly put the world at our students fingertips, but they must have a background on identifying and evaluating resources, appropriate to the task at hand, as well as awareness of digital citizenship. In addition, progress monitoring is essential, because as Adam says, students deviate from the task at hand with a single swipe. Finally, they certainly facilitate the research of information, or bring the topic to life.
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    The students at this middle school were very motivated and excited to create a picture after the novel or story they read. The girl was excited as she was analyzing the story about the people and the monsters or aliens. The students will sure remember this teacher from middle school. They were all having fun learning.
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    The students at this middle school were very motivated and excited to create a picture after the novel or story they read. The girl was excited as she was analyzing the story about the people and the monsters or aliens. The students will sure remember this teacher from middle school. They were all having fun learning.
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    I love how this school utilized the iPads! I think Juan has a good point, technology needs to be used to enhance instruction. I wish our campus has iPads, I think it would be a great way to motivate our students.
Leonila Pena

The Innovative Educator: The 5 Cs to Developing Your Personal Learning Network - 5 views

    • Leonila Pena
       
      A guide on how to create your Personal Learning Network.
    • vincent briseno
       
      The 5 Cs is a very good article. I am always amazed at how much information there is available to me with just access to a smartphone. The power of Twitter is something I still need to take advantage of and this article serves as a much needed reminder.
    • Alyssa Tanguma
       
      I think @Joshua would really enjoy this site.
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    Now I'm trying to figure out how to better organize all these links ya'll have shared that are worth filing online. Love the idea of PLN!
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    This is a great article! Consider, Consume, converse, create and celebrate are great to help teachers and students begin their own learning networks!Thank you for sharing.
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    Allowing students to connect with others is empowering students with the necessary tools; is creating a more dynamic classroom. This allows students to explore all the technology resources at their fingertips.
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    After reading this article/website, I found it beneficial and inspiring to create my own learning network. It would be great to educate the students that would like to do the same. Great site!
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    Great planning website for teaching networking reference abilities using the learning network for our students. This resource is great for students to progress and grow into using Bloom's Taxanomy
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    Very inspirational and a great website especially to use for PD. Great Info Thanks for Sharing.
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    Very true, in order to become better educators we need to collaborate and share what we know. We must also learn to receive constructive criticism. Thanks for sharing!
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    It's a great start to develop your own social/professional website. I like the way it breaks it down for you in order to know what's available online.
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    Great article, on how to help teachers and students to create their own learning network. I love how it breaks down all the information into the 5 C's
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    Great article and video explaning about networking and the 5 C's. All teachers should read this article because it breaks down in detail about networking. Thanks for sharing.
Sara Aldape

The 100 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools Chosen By You - Edudemic - 15 views

    • Alyssa Tanguma
       
      Great Classroom management tool to use. It is very similar to facebooks older layout (the one we all loved).
    • vincent briseno
       
      Thanks for sharing this website. I am always very interested to know what other teachers are using. Teacher recommendations give credibility to the sites and this list helps limit the lengthy process of evaluation web 2.0 tools.
    • Alyssa Tanguma
       
      I am a special education teacher and I've created a couple of these for the students to learn from....THEY LOVE IT!! Instead of the traditional lecturing or using a, excuse my language, boring ppt, a glog is something new for them to venture with as wel as learn from.
    • Sonia Aldape
       
      I agree that GlogsterEdu is great for students to utilize and work in the classroom for reports or Biographies. I hope to introduce this web 2.0 tool to my 4th graders to develop their presentation for a Biography that I have assigned. Great web site. Thank you Alyssa.
    • Alyssa Tanguma
       
      How many of use have heard, "Miss, I forgot my pindrive at home?" or "Miss, I lost my pindirve!" I sure have had my fair share. Dropbox allows you to be pindrive free.
    • Sara Aldape
       
      Oh yes!!!! It even helps me when I don't have my pin drive with me. Thanks for sharing these tools.
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  • To share your Web 2.0 tool, just leave a comment on this post or on the Edudemic Facebook page.
    • Marivel Garcia
       
      I have not taken the Web 2.0 class yet but I have been very lucky to have a team that utilizes these tools very effectively. As a team we use Dropbox and are very faithful to it. I can see how this would be a great tool for the upper grades to avoid the "I forgot my work" routine.
    • Marivel Garcia
       
      There are so many great websites to help ease those of us that are hesitant to expose our students to this type of learning. I love using Voki in my classroom and I also like to occasionally go on a Web Tour and allow my kids to read up on all the different types of tools that are available and others just like them are using. Great Info. Thanks
  • EDMODO: My personal favorite is www.edmodo.com – the look and feel of Facebook with the educational perspective…polls, assignments, a gradebook, and now quizzes!
    • Yadira Flores
       
      I signed up for an account but have not really explored it. I will make sure to use it. If it is like facebook my students will love it.
  • GLOGSTEREDU: GlogsterEdu is my and my students’ current favorite Web 2.0 tool. It gets technology out of the way, letting us express, share and discuss our ideas in unique, creative ways. Besides, it is just plain fun!
  • DROPBOX: My favorite web 2.0 tool is dropbox.com. I have shared many files with this and have accessed my files from a myriad of computers – even when out of the country!
    • Leonila Pena
       
      Love, love, love Dropbox. It has gotten me out of so many of those situations where I have forgotten my pen drive. In my last job every year hundreds of pen drives would be ordered by administrators to pass out to the teachers so that they could save the training materials that were provided by the trainers. This year, as part of the IT dept. we made the recommendation of using Dropbox in place of pen drives to save money. The departments saved hundreds of dollars and many teachers loved it because they could access their materials from anywhere. This also reduced the spread of viruses, which are most often brought in to the network via pen drives.
    • Alyssa Tanguma
       
      I think we are going to make it mandatory for ALL the students to create an email account within the next two weeks of school. I'm going to recommend that at the same time they create a dropbox account.
    • Yadira Flores
       
      Good idea! It would be great that all of our students at our campus had one and that our administrators would enforce it. It would be easy to have a collaborative folder like dropbox.
    • Yadira Flores
       
      I wish I had time to learn about all this tools. I think it is not impossible and if we introduce one to our students every week, they will be ready. Great resource page, thanks for sharing.
    • Santos Alvarado
       
      I really enjoy using Vuvox, its an alternative way to present information in a slideshow. Students also have fun be creative with their information. Heres a great website on Web 2.0 Tools: Effective Web 2.0 Tools for the Classroom https://sites.google.com/site/educationalweb20tools/
    • Sara Aldape
       
      I have used photobucket in the classroom and also personally. Keeps your photos organized. Great Web 2.0 tool.
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    As the title says, The best 100 Web 2.0 classroom tools. I know many of us are still a little new to a lot of the tools out there. This link is my tech bible. I constantly look at it when I want to grab my students attention again and challenge/intrigue them with a new tool. I have noticed that there are a handful that do not appear on this list, so.... Your assignment: 1. Add a sticky to at least ONE of the tools you like to integrate most. If the is already sticky, comment on it. 2. Add a sticky on one you would like to familiarize your self with more. 3. (Optional) Add a sticky anywhere on the screen if there is a tool you use that is not on the list. I do know this list if from 2011 so I'm sure you have other favorites you like to use. http://youtu.be/0VSymMbMYHA Check out the video above. It gives me the chills for some reason.
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    One of the tools I like the most is VOKI. Voki is awesome because it catches the viewers attention since the first time they look at your presentation. One of the tools that I have not used yet but would like to try it out is "PENZU". I actually had never heard about it until now that I looked at this list. This website is a GREAT RESOURCE to have available. Thank you for sharing Alyssa! I actually did not want to put this in a sticky note on the original website page because then it would say that I shared this website even-though it's you who is sharing it.
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    @ R. Palomares: Is that why it does that (referring to the sticky)? I was wondering why it had said I had shared the website for another link. Thanks!! Yeah, there were a lot of tools I had never heard about on this list. It helps to better understand my knowledge for this 21st century shift.
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    This website is Super Helpful! I have already shown it to a couple of teachers in my wing and they are excited to have so many site to choose from. I've spoken to my principal to give a mini training on a couple of site in 2 weeks. I defintley will start with Dropbox for the same reasons L Pena explained above (always forgetting my pindrive). Penzu was impressive something our English department will enjoy and Poll Anywhere is great way of getting students started with BYOD in the classroom.
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    It is great to be able to have all these different sites available with ideas on how to use them. I was able to see how it's even divided into categories, like sites for teaching, sites for planning, sites for reinforcing it is a great website and another one on my favorites list. There is not one that I prefer over another they are all so useful. In my grade level we have become faithful users of Drop Box in order to plan more effectively and have instant access to all lessons. Also Prezzi is one that my kids get easily engaged with we have been enhancing our novels with this. Great job, thanks for sharing.
  •  
    Amazing article I read on here. I would implement as many web 2.0 tools as possible in my classroom. In my computer lab however students are only working on science components in preperation for the science STARR and end of course review sessions. Students have used stixy notes for note taking strategies. I would highly encourage web 2.0 tools in classrooms and get approval from administration what tools are used.
  •  
    Great resource website for Web 2.0 Tools. I really enjoy using Vuvox, its an alternative way to present information in a slideshow. Students also have fun be creative with their information. Heres another link for Web 2.0 Tools: Effective Web 2.0 Tools for the Classroom https://sites.google.com/site/educationalweb20tools/
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    My favorite is Dropbox it is a great way to collaborate we utilize it within our integrated grade levels, 5th and 6th and we have immediate access to any new idea or information that benefits our teaching.
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    Hey Alyssa, does this use up space like icloud? I know I tried getting my students to use icloud or any other online storage space BUT our campus said it takes up too much bandwidth. Does this work the same?
  •  
    I am using some of these tools in my classroom, but I was not aware that there were so many Web 2.0 tools. I am going to look into some of these Web 2.0 tools to integrate in my classroom.
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    I'm using a couple of web 2.0 tools in the classroom and its going great so far.
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    Every tool is useful for my students but the one that they are most familiar with is glosteredu. They have use this web 2.0 tool to create a poster for their presentations. i would like to be more familiarize with dropbox.
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