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Home/ Diigo In Education/ Contents contributed and discussions participated by Terry Elliott

Contents contributed and discussions participated by Terry Elliott

Terry Elliott

Evernote Blog | Evernote Reminders Are Here on Mac, iOS and Web - 67 views

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    This might be a good place to start if you are going to make this the summer of finally using evernote to its potential for the classroom.
Terry Elliott

Leadership Day - The Pace of Change - Practical Theory - 0 views

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    So some thoughts on how to affect change in a timely, and yet, deliberate fashion. * Know why you are changing... and know what you are giving up by making this change. Every change creates winners and losers, so be sure to think through what you gain and what you lose (thanks to Neil Postman for that framework.) which leads to... * Always ask "What is the worst consequence of your best idea?" Do it for two reasons - one, because if you can't live with that consequence, don't do what you planned, but two, because the process of thinking this through will help you (and your team) mitigate the problems and you won't be as surprised when the thing you didn't think of comes up. * Research like crazy. Who has tried what you are doing? Who has tried something close to what you're doing? Who is talking about it? Who is writing about it? Who says the idea is already crazy? There aren't many truly new ideas in education, so figure out the history of your idea and learn from who has come before you. * Get lots of opinions - Come up with a smart, sensible, honest way to explain your idea and then listen. Listen a lot. Listen to the folks who don't like the idea, and ask them why. * Be honest - Don't oversell, don't overpromise, and don't pretend that the idea is perfect. * Build consensus - If only a few people are on-board with the idea, it won't work. But consensus doesn't mean taking something from everyone and sticking it onto the original idea until what you have is the worst of committee-based decisions. It means listening for the truths in what other people are telling you and being willing to make substantive change when it makes sense. * Know when to move forward. Don't let ideas die in committee because the team gets hung up on the final 5% of an idea. * Set realistic expectations for initial success, and then set up a plan to get there. If it's a tech idea -- get the tech right. (Nothing worse than getting everyone excited about a n
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    So some thoughts on how to affect change in a timely, and yet, deliberate fashion. * Know why you are changing... and know what you are giving up by making this change. Every change creates winners and losers, so be sure to think through what you gain and what you lose (thanks to Neil Postman for that framework.) which leads to... * Always ask "What is the worst consequence of your best idea?" Do it for two reasons - one, because if you can't live with that consequence, don't do what you planned, but two, because the process of thinking this through will help you (and your team) mitigate the problems and you won't be as surprised when the thing you didn't think of comes up. * Research like crazy. Who has tried what you are doing? Who has tried something close to what you're doing? Who is talking about it? Who is writing about it? Who says the idea is already crazy? There aren't many truly new ideas in education, so figure out the history of your idea and learn from who has come before you. * Get lots of opinions - Come up with a smart, sensible, honest way to explain your idea and then listen. Listen a lot. Listen to the folks who don't like the idea, and ask them why. * Be honest - Don't oversell, don't overpromise, and don't pretend that the idea is perfect. * Build consensus - If only a few people are on-board with the idea, it won't work. But consensus doesn't mean taking something from everyone and sticking it onto the original idea until what you have is the worst of committee-based decisions. It means listening for the truths in what other people are telling you and being willing to make substantive change when it makes sense. * Know when to move forward. Don't let ideas die in committee because the team gets hung up on the final 5% of an idea. * Set realistic expectations for initial success, and then set up a plan to get there. If it's a tech idea -- get the tech right. (Nothing worse than getting everyone excited about a n
Terry Elliott

Google Docs - 0 views

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    Using VoiceThreads in "classrooms"
Terry Elliott

The DO Lectures | 4th - 8th September 2008 - 0 views

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    TED channelled through Wales. Awesome talks. Great sense. Fun.
Terry Elliott

edtechpost » The Pros and Cons of Loosely Coupled Teaching - 0 views

  • Exercise Briefly look at 2-3 examples of courses run on "loosely coupled technologies," that is, outside of a CMS using contemporary Web 2.0/social software tools and methods.
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    Diigo is built for the notion of "loosely-coupled-teaching" . Every day in my classroom I improvise around a core of web2.0 pedagogies.
Terry Elliott

Journalism for the 21st Century: Zotero, Diigo and Research - 2 views

  • Diigo is good if you want to save websites of interest, and then access them from any computer. It does not provide the automatic bibliography of Zotero, but the user could simply save his bookmarks, return to the sites, hit the Zotero button and the problem is quickly solved. Diigo also features a highlighting tool that allows the user to select text from the site and write comments. If the user is logged in to Diigo and returns to the site, the highlights and comments remain. It it also somewhat useful if you want to find websites related to a certain topic that you are interested in. However, finding academic type articles or journal entires in a person's bookmarks is rare.
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    This is exactly how I use Zotero and Diigo. Extensions are tools that can be loosely joined. Integration may not be an entirely desireable outcome considering the hiearchies needed to manage it.
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    Using diigo and zotero together.
Terry Elliott

HOW TO: Convert Your Blog Into a Podcast on iTunes for Free - 1 views

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    Easy poetry readings/ lectures/ audio diary.
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