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Luciano Ferrer

Master PDF Editor for Linux - 0 views

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    * Create new PDF or edit existing ones. * Add and/or edit bookmarks in PDF files. * Fast and simple PDF forms fill out. * Changing font attributes (size, family, color etc). * Encrypt and/or protect PDF files using 128 bit encryption. * Convert XPS files into PDF. * JavaScript support. * Dynamic XFA form support. * Validation Forms and Calculate Values. * Add PDF controls (like buttons, checkboxes, lists, etc.) into your PDFs. * Import/export PDF pages into common graphical formats including BMP, JPG, PNG, and TIFF. * Signing PDF documents with digital signature, signatures creation and validation. * Free PDF Editor on Linux ( for non-commercial use)
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    * Create new PDF or edit existing ones. * Add and/or edit bookmarks in PDF files. * Fast and simple PDF forms fill out. * Changing font attributes (size, family, color etc). * Encrypt and/or protect PDF files using 128 bit encryption. * Convert XPS files into PDF. * JavaScript support. * Dynamic XFA form support. * Validation Forms and Calculate Values. * Add PDF controls (like buttons, checkboxes, lists, etc.) into your PDFs. * Import/export PDF pages into common graphical formats including BMP, JPG, PNG, and TIFF. * Signing PDF documents with digital signature, signatures creation and validation. * Free PDF Editor on Linux ( for non-commercial use)
Luciano Ferrer

The Tree of Languages Illustrated in a Big, Beautiful Infographic | Open Culture - 0 views

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    "Call it counterintuitive clickbait if you must, but Forbes' Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry made an intriguing argument when he granted the title of "Language of the Future" to French, of all tongues. "French isn't mostly spoken by French people and hasn't been for a long time now," he admits," but "the language is growing fast, and growing in the fastest-growing areas of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050. One study "even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin." I don't know about you, but I can never believe in any wave of the future without a traceable past. But the French language has one, of course, and a long and storied one at that. You see it visualized in the information graphic above (also available in suitable-for-framing prints!) created by Minna Sundberg, author of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent. "When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor," writes Mental Floss' Arika Okrent. "An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)." Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian - and, of course, our Language of the Future. The size of the branches and bunches of leaves represent the number of speakers of each language at different times: the likes of English and Spanish have sprouted into mighty vegetative clusters, while others, like, Swedish, Dutch, and Punjabi, assert a more local dominance over their own, separately grown regional branches. Will French's now-modest leaves one day cast a shadow over the w
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    "Call it counterintuitive clickbait if you must, but Forbes' Pascal-Emmanuel Gobry made an intriguing argument when he granted the title of "Language of the Future" to French, of all tongues. "French isn't mostly spoken by French people and hasn't been for a long time now," he admits," but "the language is growing fast, and growing in the fastest-growing areas of the world, particularly sub-Saharan Africa. The latest projection is that French will be spoken by 750 million people by 2050. One study "even suggests that by that time, French could be the most-spoken language in the world, ahead of English and even Mandarin." I don't know about you, but I can never believe in any wave of the future without a traceable past. But the French language has one, of course, and a long and storied one at that. You see it visualized in the information graphic above (also available in suitable-for-framing prints!) created by Minna Sundberg, author of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent. "When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor," writes Mental Floss' Arika Okrent. "An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian)." Sundberg takes this tree metaphor to a delightfully lavish extreme, tracing, say, how Indo-European linguistic roots sprouted a variety of modern-day living languages including Hindi, Portuguese, Russian, Italian - and, of course, our Language of the Future. The size of the branches and bunches of leaves represent the number of speakers of each language at different times: the likes of English and Spanish have sprouted into mighty vegetative clusters, while others, like, Swedish, Dutch, and Punjabi, assert a more local dominance over their own, separately grown regional branches. Will French's now-modest leaves one day cast a shadow over the w
Luciano Ferrer

FooPlot | Online graphing calculator and function plotter - 2 views

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    Graficador de funciones online
Ana Rodera

MyPaint - 4 views

Luciano Ferrer

Observatorio | Reduca - Red Latinoamericana por la Educación - 0 views

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    Datos educación latinoamérica (fuentes??)
Luciano Ferrer

Metaphors comic, by @stuart_mcmillen & Nick Barter graphic novel - 1 views

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    ¿Cómo usamos las metáforas? ¿las usamos? organizaciones, máquinas, organismos, herramientas... sentidos, propósitos
Luciano Ferrer

Tamaño ideal de las fotografías en las distintas redes sociales en 2018 [Infografía] - 1 views

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    "¿Qué tamaño deben tener las fotografías en las redes sociales? Depende de la plataforma y del tipo de fotografía que estemos hablando: no es lo mismo una imagen para la cabecera del perfil de Facebook que una para un post en Twitter, por ejemplo. A la hora de preparar una imagen para las redes sociales es necesario tener en cuenta las dimensiones recomendadas para el espacio que va a ocupar en esa plataforma concreta. La dificultad estriba en que a menudo las distintas redes sociales cambian su maquetación y diseño y, con ello, también el tamaño recomendado para la imagen, por lo que toca actualizarla constantemente para que la cuenta quede perfectamente optimizada. En la siguiente infografía se recogen las principales dimensiones que las imágenes deben tener en redes sociales como Facebook, Instagram y Twitter, actualizadas al primer trimestre de 2018."
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