Skip to main content

Home/ Advanced Concepts Team/ Group items tagged science

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Nina Nadine Ridder

Microscopic fish are 3-D-printed to do more than swim: Researchers demonstrate a novel ... - 0 views

  •  
    Useful for space exploration, e.g. subsurface water reservoirs such as Europa or Enceladus?

    Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego used an innovative 3-D printing technology they developed to manufacture multipurpose fish-shaped microrobots -- called microfish -- that swim around efficiently in liquids, are chemically powered by hydrogen peroxide and magnetically controlled.
Nina Nadine Ridder

Earth's extremes point the way to extraterrestrial life - 0 views

  •  
    Seems a little speculative but pretty interesting thoughts. In regards to terraforming Mars this might be of interest:
    "During the daytime, plant-like microorganisms on a Martian-like surface could photosynthesize hydrogen peroxide. At night, when the atmosphere is relatively humid, they could use their stored hydrogen peroxide to scavenge water from the atmosphere, similar to how microbial communities in the Atacama use the moisture that salt brine extracts from the air to stay alive."
Ma Ru

An intellectually challenging game of loop - 2 views

  •  
    In case you are looking for inspiration for a new piece of ACT's meeting room furniture...

    "This is almost an example, not of mathematics but how mathematics changes when it becomes physics"
jcunha

Introducing A Brain-inspired Computer [IBM TrueNorth] - 0 views

  •  
    Built in Silicon technology (Samsung's 28 nm process), its power is measured as one million neurons and 256 million synapses. It contains 5.4 million transistor being the largest IBM chip in these terms. All this said, it consumes less than 100 mW!!

    "These systems can efficiently process high-dimensional, noisy sensory data in real time, while consuming orders of magnitude less power than conventional computer architectures." IBM is working with initLabs to integrate the DVS retinal camera with these chips = real time image neuro-like image processing.

    In what seems to be a very successful project hugely funded by DARPA, "Our sights are now set high on the ambitious goal of integrating 4,096 chips in a single rack with 4 billion neurons and 1 trillion synapses while consuming ~4kW of power."
Ma Ru

ISS astronauts bite into space-grown lettuce - 0 views

  •  
    Next great step for humankind.

    "... and we're standing by now for the first consumption of one of these red romaine lettuce leaves ..." :-)
jcunha

Portable ultra-broadband lasers could be key to next-generation sensors - 0 views

  •  
    Quantum Cascade Lasers are rising in the mid-infrared region, the so-called fingerprint zone of the electromagnetic spectrum for a whole bunch of chemical species that we are most of times interested in sensing. One more sign of the underlying importance of this technology comes just by seeing NSF, USHS, Naval Air Command and NASA as the main monetary contributors to this research.
Juxi Leitner

Robots to the Rescue!: JPL's RoboSimian and Surrogate Robots are here to Help - 2 views

  •  
    Robots to the Rescue!: JPL's RoboSimian and Surrogate Robots are here to Help
  •  
    Also many other interesting videos of the Karman Lectures
Nina Nadine Ridder

Surprising similarity in fly and mouse motion vision - 1 views

  •  
    Loosely related to an old ACT project on optical flow (if I remember correctly but even if not still an interesting read I think):

    "At first glance, the eyes of mammals and those of insects do not seem to have much in common. However, a comparison of the neural circuits for detecting motion shows surprising parallels between flies and mice. Scientists have learned a lot about the visual perception of both animals in recent years."
Nina Nadine Ridder

NASA discovers Earth-like planet orbiting 'cousin' of Sun - 1 views

  •  
    Astronomers hunting for another Earth have found what may be the closest match yet, a potentially rocky planet circling its star at the same distance as the Earth orbits the Sun, NASA said Thursday.
Nina Nadine Ridder

Testing shows using microwaves to propel a craft into space might work - 3 views

  •  
    A team of researchers at Colorado based Escape Dynamics is reporting that initial tests indicate that it might really be possible to launch space-planes into space using microwaves sent from the ground, to allow for a single stage spacecraft. If the idea pans out, the cost savings for sending satellites (or perhaps humans) into orbit could be considerable.
  •  
    Not very new, but a very slick video nonetheless! Will it work? I am not so sure whether "just engineering" applies in this case. The array of antenna's required is quite significant to compensate for beam losses. Wall plug efficiency is not that high therefore, then again.. solar energy is for free almost in the future so who cares.. let's go for it! :)
Nina Nadine Ridder

Why is life left-handed? The answer is in the stars - 2 views

  •  
    While most humans are right-handed, our proteins are made up of lefty molecules. In the same way your left and right hands mirror one another, molecules can assemble in two reflected structures. Life prefers the left-handed version, which is puzzling since both mirrored types form equally in the laboratory.
Nina Nadine Ridder

New Satellite Maps Reveal Global Ocean Alkalinity - 3 views

  •  
    Innovative techniques that use satellites to monitor ocean acidification are set to revolutionize the way that scientists study the Earth's oceans. This new approach offers remote monitoring of large swathes of inaccessible ocean from satellites, including ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission.
Nina Nadine Ridder

Study suggests the Red Planet was icy rather than watery billions of years ago - 1 views

  •  
    The high seas of Mars may never have existed. According to a new study that looks at two opposite climate scenarios of early Mars, a cold and icy planet billions of years ago better explains the water drainage and erosion features seen today.
  •  
    That's a lot of assumptions along the way, what do you think of it Nina?
Nina Nadine Ridder

Carbon dioxide pools discovered in Aegean Sea - 1 views

  •  
    The location of the second largest volcanic eruption in human history, the waters off Greece's Santorini are the site of newly discovered opalescent pools forming at 250 meters depth. The interconnected series of meandering, iridescent white pools contain high concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO 2) and may hold answers to questions related to deepsea carbon storage as well as provide a means of monitoring the volcano for future eruptions.
  •  
    We were there last year, swimming in one of those 'healthy' mud pits..
  •  
    250m and we did not know about them ??
jcunha

Interference of thermal waves - Can heat be controlled as waves? - 1 views

  •  
    Imagine a material that only admits thermal conduction for certain temperatures. Martin Maldovan from Georgia Tech holds a tiny thermoelectric device that turns cold on one side when current is applied. Recent research has focused on the possibility of using interference effects in phonon waves to control heat transport in materials.

    These are exciting news (see Nature Materials paper here http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/v14/n7/full/nmat4308.html). Heterostructure research lead to outstanding new possibilities when applied to electronic transport (e.g. in quantum well and quantum dots) and to photonics (e.g. Quantum Cascade Laser tunnable lasers).
    Apparently the time has come to see selective thermal control in this way! Truly exciting!!
jcunha

Where Life Meets Light: Bio-Inspired Photonics - 0 views

  •  
    Octopus and optoelectronics camouflage, light bugs and LEDs, or spider webs and touch screens, ... a whole cool bunch of biomimetic stuff
  •  
    See also the referred work "Light-extraction enhancement for light-emitting diodes: a firefly-inspired structure refined by the genetic algorithm" - quite cool!
    https://pure.fundp.ac.be/portal/files/11946897/paper89.pdf
Thijs Versloot

Black Hole Hunters - Event Horizon Telescope @nytimes - 1 views

  •  
    Nice web story on setting up the event horizon telescope network of up to 20 telescopes across the globe to observe the black hole at the galaxy's center
Thijs Versloot

Student Confirms That There Are Enormous Tubes Of Plasma Floating Above The Earth - 1 views

  •  
    A 60-year-old theory about the structure of the magnetic fields that surround Earth has been confirmed directly for the first time. The lead author of the paper is an undergraduate student who invented a way to view the Earth's magnetosphere in three dimensions.
Thijs Versloot

Solar singlet fission bends the laws of physics to boost solar power efficiency by 30% ... - 2 views

  •  
    Chemists at UCR have found a way of turning a single photon into two excitons, by a process known as singlet fission. By doubling the yield of excitons in a solar cell, you theoretically double the number of electrons produced and could lead to having a max theoretical efficiency of 60% or more in an (organic) solar cell

    See also DOI: 10.1021/jz500676c - "Singlet Fission: From Coherences to Kinetics"
jcunha

Training and operation of an integrated neural network based on memristors - 0 views

  •  
    Almost in time for the workshop last week!
    This new Nature paper (e-mail me for full paper) claims training and usage of neural network implemented with metal-oxide memristors, without selector CMOS. They used it to implement a delta-rule algorithm for classification of 3x3 pixel black and white letters. Very impressive work!!!!
  •  
    For those not that much into the topic, see the Nature's News and View section www.nature.com/nature/journal/v521/n7550/full/521037a.html?WT.ec_id=NATURE-20150507 where they feature this article.
1 - 20 of 676 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page