Skip to main content

Home/ Web2.0/ Group items tagged article

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Bill Selak

Using Mobile and Social Technologies in Schools - 71 views

  •  
    welcome to my website thi truong bat dong san DAT BINH DUONG you'll have new look into Vietnamese real estate
  • ...3 more comments...
  •  
    chinese new year new year funny jokes new year wishes
  •  
    happy mothers day 2016 .
  •  
    Rediffmail login Rediffmail Sign In
  •  
    Hotmail login Hotmail Sign In
gino carpio

Will Article Spinning Help Your SEO Efforts Or Kill Your Site? - 4 views

  •  
    Article Spinning - What exactly is it? Will it really help to increase your rankings? Find out why article spinning has been labeled as 'black-hat' and what SEO alternatives you can use to reap long-term benefits for your site.
yc c

joshua's blog: on url shorteners - great linkrot apocalypse - 6 views

  • We hope the shortener never decides to add interstitials or otherwise "monetize" the link with ads, but we have no guarantee.
    • yc c
       
      Too late...
  • The most likely, of course, is that we don't do anything and that the great linkrot apocalypse causes all of modern culture to dissapear in a puff of smoke. Hopefully.
  •  
    He thinks that shorteners are bad for the internet ecosystem, and I quit agree.
awqi zar

The New Hampshire - UNH Study: Social media usage doesn't affect academics - 6 views

  •  
    Students who fear that spending too much time on social media sites will affect their academic performance can breathe easy, according to a new study.
awqi zar

What Your Gadget Really Costs: Consumer Electronics Teardowns - BusinessWeek - 2 views

  •  
    The cost to make an iPod, Xbox, and other electronics has big bottom-line implications at Apple, Microsoft, and their peers. Some companies are willing to swallow losses on some gadgets-for instance, gaming consoles-in hopes that they'll make up the difference, and then some, on sales of related gear, such as video game software. Other companies, including Apple, are able to sell many products for a healthy profit from the get-go.
awqi zar

Apple's 10 biggest problems - Apple 2.0 - Fortune Brainstorm Tech - 14 views

  •  
    Daring Fireball's John Gruber - a Drexel University computer major turned professional blogger - is perhaps the most forceful and articulate defender on the Web of all things Apple (AAPL). He came to Macworld Expo 2010, however, not to praise the company but to probe its vulnerabilities
awqi zar

5 Insightful TED Talks on Social Media - 12 views

  •  
    As social media has become a game changer for industries across the board, you can bet the experts at this year's TED conference will have their sights set on peeling back the hype and getting at the core of what social technology has in store for this year and beyond.
awqi zar

Super Bowl Ads 2010 [VIDEOS] - 2 views

  •  
    YouTube delivered on its promise to upload all the Super Bowl Ads as soon as they aired today, with users voting to choose which one will grace the YouTube front page on Thursday.
yc c

Does the Brain Like E-Books? - Room for Debate Blog - NYTimes.com - 3 views

  • They should be like the historical coffeehouses, taverns and pubs where one shifts flexibly between focused and collective reading — much like opening a newspaper and debating it in a more socially networked version of the current New York Times Room for Debate.
    • Bakari Chavanu
       
      Many websites like NewsVine seem to offer this kind of experience.
  • Still, people read more slowly on screen, by as much as 20-30 percent. Fifteen or 20 years ago, electronic reading also impaired comprehension compared to paper, but those differences have faded in recent studies.
  • Reading on screen requires slightly more effort and thus is more tiring, but the differences are small and probably matter only for difficult tasks.
  • ...18 more annotations...
  • In one study, workers switched tasks about every three minutes and took over 23 minutes on average to return to a task. Frequent task switching costs time and interferes with the concentration needed to think deeply about what you read.
  • After many years of research on how the human brain learns to read, I came to an unsettlingly simple conclusion: We humans were never born to read. We learn to do so by an extraordinarily ingenuous ability to rearrange our “original parts” — like language and vision, both of which have genetic programs that unfold in fairly orderly fashion within any nurturant environment. Reading isn’t like that.
  • And that, of course, is the problem at hand. No one really knows the ultimate effects of an immersion in a digital medium on the young developing brain. We do know a great deal, however, about the formation of what we know as the expert reading brain that most of us possess to this point in history
  • Hypertext offers loads of advantages. If while reading online you come across the name “Antaeus” and forget your Greek mythology, a hyperlink will take you directly to an online source where you are reminded that he was the Libyan giant who fought Hercules. And if you’re prone to distraction, you can follow another link to find out his lineage, and on and on. That is the duality of hyperlinks. A hyperlink brings you to information faster but is also more of a distraction.
  • floor. I once counted my books among my most prized possesions, now I wish I could somehow convert them all to digital files.
  • My book shelves are full, and books are stacked on the
  • Textbooks also require big double pages with margins for notes. Writing and reading are communication between writer and reader, the audience and genre (and thus expectations) are important, and the format and technology can be used for bad or good. One is not better than the other, they are different, and the more we know of the needs of writers and readers the better technology will become.
  • All of the commentators and responses miss a crucial question here: reading for what purpose?
  • To further complicate this, most of what I read for pleasure is about art or photography, and the kind of history that comes with cool pictures. If paper suddenly disappeared I'd be lost. Most of what I read for work has to be verified, cross referenced, fact-checked, etc. on a tight deadline. If the Internet suddenly disappeared, I'd be more than lost--I'd be paralyzed.
  • I also completely disagree that the web has killed editing. It has just changed the process to include the reader. It would be more accurate to say that it is killing the sanctity of Editors. 'Bout time, that.
  • The missing component in E-Reading seems to be the ability to critically grasp and evaluate the material. Learning is transmitted, but it is more linear than holistic. Now in my 70's, I find that reading from a monitor is a distancing experience. There is an intimacy to reading from a traditional book that is missing in the digital format.
  • Chinese reading circuits require more visual memory than alphabets.
  • I assume that technology will soon start moving in the natural direction: integrating chips into books, not vice versa.
  • important ongoing change to reading itself in today’s online environment is the cheapening of the word.
  • Hypertext offers loads of advantages.
  • When you read news, or blogs or fiction, you are reading one document in a networked maze
  • More and more, studies are showing how adept young people are at multitasking. But the extent to which they can deeply engage with the online material is a question for further research.
  • However, displays have vastly improved since then, and now with high resolution monitors reading speed is no different than reading from paper.
yc c

Gov 2.0: It's All About The Platform - 0 views

  • But as with Web 2.0, the real secret of success in Government 2.0 is thinking about government as a platform. If there’s one thing we learn from the technology industry, it’s that every big winner has been a platform company: someone whose success has enabled others, who’ve built on their work and multiplied its impact. Microsoft put “a PC on every desk and in every home,” the internet connected those PCs, Google enabled a generation of ad-supported startups, Apple turned the phone market upside down by letting developers loose to invent applications no phone company would ever have thought of. In each case, the platform provider raised the bar, and created opportunities for others to exploit.
  •  
    But as with Web 2.0, the real secret of success in Government 2.0 is thinking about government as a platform. If there's one thing we learn from the technology industry, it's that every big winner has been a platform company: someone whose success has enabled others, who've built on their work and multiplied its impact. Microsoft put "a PC on every desk and in every home," the internet connected those PCs, Google enabled a generation of ad-supported startups, Apple turned the phone market upside down by letting developers loose to invent applications no phone company would ever have thought of. In each case, the platform provider raised the bar, and created opportunities for others to exploit.
arrow tricks

all about Web 2.0 - 45 views

Java Training in Bangalore java/j2ee classes Bangalore java Training Center Bangalore Best Core Java Training in Bangalore java Course in Bangalore Best Java Training Institute Bangalore Marathaha...

web 2.0 article design IT

yc c

The Future of the Internet-And How to Stop It - 0 views

  •  
    The Future of the Internet explains the engine that has catapulted the Internet from backwater to ubiquity-and reveals that it is sputtering precisely because of its runaway success. With the unwitting help of its users, the generative Internet is on a path to a lockdown, ending its cycle of innovation-and facilitating unsettling new kinds of control.
1 - 20 of 28 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page