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Anne Bubnic

Terror in the Classroom: What Can be Done?, Part 2 - 0 views

  • what are the concerns students have regarding cyberbullying, why do they do it, and how comfortable are they in talking to others about cyberbullying.
  • The study found approximately 29 percent had been victims of cyberbullying and 24 percent had bullied someone online. Of those who had admitted to being cyberbullied, 59 percent admitted to bullying someone as well. In addition, approximately 80 percent of all of the students surveyed reported that they aware of instances of cyberbullying.

    When male and female experiences were considered separately, it was found that over 20 percent of males and over 34 percent of females had experienced cyberbullying. In addition, 29 percent of males and only 20 percent of females reported to have cyberbullied.

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    Effects of Cyberbullying. Many victims of cyberbullying feel trapped, frustrated and distracted. Victims may also experience depression, sadness, low self-esteem, anger, thoughts of suicide and stress. Sociologist Robert Agnew maintains that those who experience this stress or strain are more likely to participate in "deviant or delinquent" behaviors in order to cope (Hinduja and Patchin, 2006). This is especially important to note because of the potential for delinquent behaviors affecting peers, school work, family and the community.
Anne Bubnic

Terror in the Classroom: What Can Be Done?, Part 3 - 0 views

  • Of those that reported that they had been cyberbullied, over 50 percent reported the cyberbullying lasted on average 2-4 days, while approximately 30 percent lasted a week or longer. Over 41 percent of the time cyberbullying took place with instant messaging, chat rooms and blogs (MySpace, Xanga, Facebook, Bebo, etc). In addition, 35 percent reported that e-mail was used to cyberbullied them.
  • ngry, depressed and hurt were the top three emotions experienced
  • he most reported reasons those that admitted to cyberbullying (14/59) gave were out of revenge (57 percent) and anger (43 percent) while 21 percent admit to cyberbullying because they did not like the other person. When asked how the cyberbullying take place, the results are similar to the ones reported by victims of cyberbullying: 43 percent by instant messaging or chat rooms and 36 percent by e-mails or blogs
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    A Look At The Cyberbully. This study confirms other studies (Opinion Research, (2006) on the prevalence of cyberbullying in that about a third (29%) admitted to being bullied with half of them reporting that additional bullying accompanied the initial cyberbullying. Research finds a connection between bullies, cyberbullies and their victims. Bullies, compared to non-bullies, were more likely to be cyberbullies; while victims of physical bullying were more likely to be victims of cyberbullying
Anne Bubnic

Terror in the Classroom: What Can be Done?, Part 4 - 0 views

  • A survey conducted by MSN United Kingdom found that 74% of teens as compared to 80% in this study did not go to anyone for advice when they were cyberbullied (www.msn.co.uk/cyberbullying, 2006). One reason some teenagers are reluctant to tell parents or adults is the fear of retaliation.
  • Many times parents don't get involved because they are afraid of invading their teen's privacy. Others may feel that as long as they have filtering software their teen is protected from negative material.
  • Parents need to be educated about cyberbullying- what it looks like, what the effects are and how to handle it. Rosalind Wiseman, educator and author of the best seller "Queen Bees & Wannabes", suggest parents consider the following:

    • Use technology as an opportunity to reinforce your family values. Attach rules and consequences if inappropriate behavior occurs.
    • Move the computer out of your child's bedroom and into the family room.
    • Teach your child not to share passwords.
    • Install monitoring and filtering software.
    • Monitor your child's screen name(s) and Web sites for inappropriate content.
    • If cyberbullying occurs, save and print out any evidence and decide whom you should contact for assistance.
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  • n Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District, 393 U.S. 503 (1969). The court ruled that a student's right to free speech can be limited when the speech "materially disrupts class work or involves substantial disorder or invasion of the rights of others." The standard of "material disruption" set by Tinker is often referred to by the courts
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    What Can Parents Do? Schools should start addressing students, parents and staff about the issues of cyberbullying. Students need to be reminded that what they do in cyberspace is not really anonymous. They need to know their behaviors and words are downloadable, printable and sometimes punishable by law. The courts have given some direction for schools dealing with cyberbullying. "School districts are well within their legal rights to intervene in cyberbullying incidents - even if these incidents were initiated off-campus - if it can be demonstrated that the incident resulted in a substantial disruption of the educational environment"
Anne Bubnic

What is cyberbullying? [teen video] - 0 views

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    Cyberbullying experiences from a teen perspective.
Anne Bubnic

MySpace lecture generates outrage - 0 views

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    Students and parents at Windsor High School are outraged after a Wyoming police officer doing a presentation on Internet safety scrutinized individual students' MySpace pages, calling the students' pictures "slutty" and saying their sites invited sexual predators. The officer, John F. Gay III of the Cheyenne Police Department, picked out six or seven Windsor High School students' MySpace pages and began to criticize photos, comments and other content until one student left the room crying.
Anne Bubnic

As 'Trolling' Turns More Vicious, What, If Anything, Can Stop It? - 0 views

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    One afternoon in the spring of 2006, for reasons unknown to those who knew him, Mitchell Henderson, a seventh grader from Rochester, Minnesota, took a .22-caliber rifle down from a shelf in his parents' bedroom closet and shot himself in the head. The next morning, Mitchell's school assembled in the gym to begin mourning. His classmates created a virtual memorial on MySpace and garlanded it with remembrances. One wrote that Mitchell was a "hero to take that shot, to leave us all behind. God do we wish we could take it back." Someone e-mailed a clipping of Mitchell's newspaper obituary to MyDeathSpace.com, a Web site that links to the MySpace pages of the dead.
Anne Bubnic

Cyberbullying WebQuest - 0 views

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    This WebQuest was designed for 5th - 8th grade students. It could be used as part of a technology class, home room, or social studies class. Cyberbullying is a growing issue in schools. By helping students research the issues around cyberbullying, the process alone it will raise awareness levels. Student recommendation from this WebQuest should be taken to the School Board. Students need to know that voice will be heard. Policy or handbook changes they recommend can actually be done.
Anne Bubnic

CyberBully Alert Develops Method for Combating Online Cyberbullying - 0 views

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    In an effort to protect children and teenagers online, Vanden Corporation, based in California and dedicated to youth safety is proud to introduce CyberBully Alert a ground-breaking software designed to help the thousands of young people who every day are the victim of the growing crime of cyberbullying. CyberBully Alert is a web-based solution that simplifies the notification and documentation of cyberbullying. It lets children instantly notify predetermined, caring adults of bullying or online harassment - in a communication style used by today's tech-savvy, young people.
Anne Bubnic

AT&T Takes Online Safety to the Classroom - 0 views

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    AT&T announced it is returning to the classroom through online safety education developed by the Internet Keep Safe Coalition (iKeepSafe) and presented by Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) officers.The Nation's Largest Broadband Provider and 4,500 D.A.R.E. Officers will Provide Online Safety Lessons to Parents, Students and Communities Nationwide.
Anne Bubnic

Twitter and Plurk: What Parents Should Know - 0 views

  • While there is nothing inherently dangerous in the sites themselves, there is the risk that teens could use microblogs to reveal personal information or engage in a relationship with someone whose intentions are less than honorable. And like any other form of communication, the door is open for a teen to take risks such as talking about sex with strangers (albeit in relatively short bursts) or getting together with someone they meet through a microblog.
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    Services like Twitter and Plurk let people post very short messages (140 characters or less) to their friends and acquaintances. Founded in 2006, Twitter has attracted millions of users who keep people posted about what they're doing and thinking. It can be as simple as "I'm standing in line at the grocery store" to as profound as a quick comment about a political candidate, a world event or a new book. There's even a video spin-off of this concept called 12 Seconds that allows people to post video clips no longer than 12 seconds.
Anne Bubnic

Cybersafety Materials for PTA Presentations - 0 views

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    Are you planning a cybersafety program for parents when students return to school? These resources may help!
Anne Bubnic

Defense: Prosecutors can't bend law to fit MySpace hoax - 0 views

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    A defense attorney for the Missouri woman charged in a MySpace hoax that allegedly led to a 13-year-old girl's suicide argued Monday in court papers that prosecutors are bending a cyber crime statute to prosecute his client.

Anne Bubnic

Zwinky.com warning for parents - 0 views

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    It's an animated website that claims it's for young audiences. Zwinky.com looks innocent enough. But is it a safe place for your tweens?
Anne Bubnic

Internet troll claims authorship of Megan Meier blog - 0 views

  • Trolls use the Internet to emotionally upset someone they don't know. They typically pick people or issues that, in their view, need to be ridiculed. They don't use their real names and attempt to inflame online discussions by posting outrageous and hurtful comments just to see who will take the bait.Fortuny told the newspaper he created the blog to question the public's hunger for remorse and to challenge the enforceability of cyberspace harassment laws like the one passed in Dardenne Prairie, where 13-year-old Meier had lived. She killed herself in October 2006.
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    The person behind the inflammatory blog "Megan Had it Coming" is a 32-year-old information technology freelancer who lives near Seattle, according to a story about Internet trolls that ran Aug. 3 in The New York Times. Jason Fortuny had no connection with events in Missouri surrounding the 2006 death of Megan Meier. As some had suspected, he is an Internet troll.
Anne Bubnic

Klicksafe tv ad with subtitles [PSA] - 0 views

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    This ad transfers the situation of the Internet to the real life to show that parents often don't really know what their kids are doing and so don't protect them properly
Anne Bubnic

Disney.com | Internet Safety - 0 views

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    Disney.com Internet Safety site with safety rules, a parent/child internet contract, and safety tips. Developed in collaboration with Wired Safety.
Anne Bubnic

Doug Johnson's Cyberbullying Guide [PDF] - 0 views

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    Written for Mankato (MN) Area Public Schools.
Anne Bubnic

Parents of Beaten Teen, Victoria Lindsay, Speak Out [Video] - 0 views

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    Talisa Lindsay and Patrick Lindsay talk to reporters in Lakeland about the March 30 assault on their daughter, Victoria, by a group of teen girls.
Anne Bubnic

Bullying Beyond the Schoolyard: Preventing and Responding to Cyberbullying - 0 views

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    Bullying Beyond the Schoolyard: Preventing and Responding to Cyberbullying

    Co-authors Dr. Sameer Hinduja and Dr. Justin W. Patchin provide a comprehensive guide to identify, prevent and respond to this increasingly serious problem. The book is primarily based on Hinduja and Patchin's original research with thousands of adolescents, many of whom were victims of cyberbullying. In addition to providing numerous practical strategies for educators, parents and other youth-serving adults, the book includes personal stories and case scenarios, an extensive overview of terminology and legal issues, and a clear explanation of the scope and prevalence of online aggression among youth.

Anne Bubnic

New mobile cyber safety in Florida - 0 views

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    Smart Attorney General in Florida!!! Nailed a vendor on cyberfraud charges and translated it into $1 million for Cybersafety Education programs!
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