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Margaret Moore-Taylor

Student Safety in the Age of Facebook -- THE Journal - 2 views

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    Interesting article that discusses AUP. One analogy is how we make kids water safe. You don't make kids water-safe by trying to eliminate swimming pools. You make them safe by teaching them how to swim. Teach about acceptable use and not restriction of technology.
Margaret Moore-Taylor

Web 2.0/Mobile AUP Guide - 1 views

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    This is a guide to assist school districts in developing, rethinking or revising Internet policies as a consequence of the emergence of web 2.0 and the growing pervasiveness of smart phone use.
Anne Bubnic

Technology Honor Code - 8 views

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    Technology Honor Code from Castilleja Independent School for Girls (Palo Alto, CA).
Anne Bubnic

Policy Decisions: Social networking in schools - 0 views

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    Since social-media use is so multi-faceted, no single approach will apply to all situations. Some schools may opt to place an outright ban on social-media access at school as well as prohibit "friending" parents, students and other employees. Other schools may simply prohibit employees from identifying their school online. As the use of social-networking sites for educational and community communication purposes increases, schools may need to adapt to the mainstream use of such sites and recognize that a blanket prohibition simply isn't practical. Regardless, your school should take action now to safeguard against social media mishaps.
Anne Bubnic

Smart AUP Quiz - Assessment tool for student understanding of AUP - 4 views

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    A school's Acceptable Use Policy, or AUP, is a list of technology regulations that require students to use technology responsibly and prevent abuse of school computers. Students are often required to sign this "user contract" in order to use school network computers but unfortunately many sign without reading or understanding the information. The Smart AUP assessment tool is a fun and effective way for students to demonstrate to teachers and administrators that they have read and understand the AUP.
Anne Bubnic

How to Protect Kids' Privacy Online: A Guide for Teachers - 1 views

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    Many school districts are adopting Acceptable Use Policies (AUPs) to educate parents and students about Internet use and issues of online privacy and safety, and seek parental consent for their children's use of the Internet. For example, an AUP may tell parents about the privacy policies of online services with which a school has contracts and students' use of non-contract websites. It may include cautions against children disclosing personal information to websites - such as their full name, home or email address, and telephone number. Or it may tell parents that the school has established classroom email accounts rather than individual accounts if email communication is necessary between students and online services.
Anne Bubnic

Rules for Student Blogging [pdf] - 2 views

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    Blogging rules for students and teachers, as created by Hillsdale Public Schools.
Anne Bubnic

Schools Left in the Dust on the Social Media Highway - 4 views

  • "Our computer use policy is extensive. The frame is this is how you will use the computers when you are here, you can't go on these sites and do these things while you're at school, but when they get out from school and start using computers of their own to do some of these things, then it becomes a little bit more clouded," he said.
  • The problem NEOLA faces is a lack of law to base policies on regarding student and staff use of Facebook, Myspace, Twitter, etc. In turn, there are no policies for district administrators to follow, leaving a gray area for disciplinary issues. State legislature was passed regarding bullying, so NEOLA set policies based on that, but in terms of writing policy on technology, direction is what NEOLA is lacking.
Anne Bubnic

Social Media and Digital Citizenship - 2 views

  • Content filters, policies and guideline aren’t the final answer. If we are to have our students become true citizens we need to it though teaching.
Anne Bubnic

Bullying Policy at Hudson Area School District - 0 views

  • Bullying or other aggressive behavior toward a student, whether by other students, staff, or third parties, including Board members, parents, guests, contractors, vendors, and volunteers, is strictly prohibited. This prohibition includes physical, verbal, and psychological abuse, including hazing, gestures, comments, threats, or actions to a student, which cause or threaten to cause bodily harm, reasonable fear for personal safety or personal degradation. Demonstration of appropriate behavior, treating others with civility and respect, and refusing to tolerate harassment or bullying is expected of administrators, faculty, staff, and volunteers to provide positive examples for student behavior.

    This policy applies to all activities in the District, including activities on school property, in a school vehicle, and those occurring off school property if the student or employee is at any school-sponsored, school-approved or school-related activity or function, such as field trips or athletic events where students are under the school’s control, or where an employee is engaged in school business. Misconduct occurring outside of school may also be disciplined if it interferes with the school environment.

    "Bullying" is any gesture or written, verbal, graphic, or physical act (including electronically transmitted acts – i.e. internet, telephone or cell phone, personal digital assistant (PDA), or wireless hand held device) that is reasonably perceived as being motivated either by any actual or perceived characteristic, such as race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression or a mental, physical, or sensory disability or impairment; or by any other distinguishing characteristic. Such behavior is considered harassment or bullying whether it takes place on or off school property, at any school-sponsored function, or in a school vehicle.

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    Includes a clause for cyberbullying.
Anne Bubnic

Schools left in the dust on social media highway - 2 views

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    There are no policies at any of the three districts that directly addresses popular social networking Web sites, because, administrations are finding, they can't keep up with technology.
Anne Bubnic

'Sexting' common among teens | Educators Struggle to Control the Trend - 0 views

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    Painfully aware of this rampant trend, high school educators are very concerned about the impact sexting can have on teenage lives and are working urgently to address the problem by examining policies regarding cell phone use during school hours.
Anne Bubnic

Cyber Bullying - School Policies? - 0 views

  • A punch in the eye seems so passé. Bullies these days are traveling in packs and using cyberspace to their humiliating messages online. Like the toughies of old, they are both boys and girls and they demand nothing less than total submission as the price of peace.

    It’s a jungle out there.

    For school districts, patrolling the hallways and adjacent grounds is just a start. In the 21st century, a new kind of vigilance is necessary—an expanded jurisdiction that serves to both stave off legal actions and ensure a safe and productive learning environment.

  • Today’s principals rely on district policy and practice to extend the presumed long arm of the law to off-campus incidents. Potentially, that could mean plunging headlong into the electronic frontier to rescue student victims and thwart cyberbullying classmates who thrive as faceless computer culprits.
  • A December 2009 study by Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society found that students on the receiving end report greater emotional distress, are more likely to abuse substances, and are more frequently depressed.
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  • The report concluded a child is more likely to face cyberbullying by fellow students than being stalked by an online predator. “Bullying and harassment are the most frequent threats minors face, both online and offline,” notes the Harvard report, Enhancing Child Safety & Online Technologies: Final Report of the Internet Safety Task Force to the Multistate Working Group on Social Networking of State Attorneys General of the United States.
  • Bullying can take a variety of forms. Incidents have included stealing passwords, impersonating the victim online, fake MySpace or Facebook pages, embarrassing photos or information being revealed, threats, rumors, and more. And, bullying tends to magnify the longer it exists.
  • Students sometimes will cyberbully teachers or other school employees
  • In January, a federal court in Connecticut ruled that Regional District 10 was within its rights to discipline a student over an off-campus blog. Judge Mark Kravitz rejected Avery Doninger’s claim that the school violated her free speech rights when they refused to let her serve as class secretary or to speak at graduation because of words she wrote at home
  • According to the Hartford Courant, the school district won “because the discipline involved participation in a voluntary extracurricular activity, because schools could punish vulgar, off-campus speech if it posed a reasonably foreseeable risk of coming onto school property, and because Doninger’s live journal post was vulgar, misleading, and created the risk of substantial disruption at school.”
  • In Florida, a high school senior and honor student was accused of cyberbullying after she wrote on Facebook: ‘’Ms. Sarah Phelps is the worst teacher I’ve ever met! To those select students who have had the displeasure of having Ms. Sarah Phelps, or simply knowing her and her insane antics: Here is the place to express your feelings of hatred.’’ Katherine Evans, who was suspended for “bullying and cyberbullying harassment toward a staff member,” sued the charter school in December 2008. A final ruling is pending.
  • In a 2007 incident, 19 students were suspended at a Catholic high school near Toronto for cyberbullying a principal on Facebook. The students called the principal a “Grinch of School Spirit” and made vulgar and derogatory comments.

    While the U.S. Constitution does not necessarily apply in private school settings, the incident demonstrates that this kind of behavior can happen anywhere.

  • Districts should have a cyberbullying policy that takes into account the school’s values as well as the school’s ability to legally link off-campus actions with what is happening or could happen at school.
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    Good article from AMERICAN SCHOOL on the policies that schools need to have in place to protect both students and teachers from cyberbullies.
Anne Bubnic

Better Safe Than Sorry: Does Your Library Have an Online Acceptable-Use Policy? - 0 views

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    What preventative steps can we take to reduce the risk of being sued?
Anne Bubnic

Anti-bullying plans and policies for area schools - 1 views

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    Plans to address bullying and cyberbullying behavior in Kansas School Districts are clearly laid out in this article.
Anne Bubnic

Curbing Cyberbullying in School and on the Web - 0 views

  • Many of the most egregious acts of cyberbullying do not take place during school hours or on school networks, a situation that presents a dilemma for public school administrators: If they punish a student for off-campus behavior, they could get hit with a freedom of speech suit.  If they do nothing, students may continue to suffer and school officials theoretically could get hit with failure to act litigation. For school administrators, it appears to be an unfortunate “catch-22.” For lawyers, it’s a “perfect storm,” pitting freedom of speech advocates against the victims of cyberbullying and schools that try to intervene. There are no easy answers in this arena, few laws, and no well-established precedents that specifically deal with cyberbullying.
  • “School administrators can intervene in cyberbullying incidents, even if the incidents do not take place on school grounds, if they can demonstrate that the electronic speech resulted in a substantial disruption to the educational environment.”
  • These cases illustrate not only a lack of precedent on cyberbullying cases, but also a dilemma for school administrators on how to handle cyberbullying.  “There are few laws that address how to handle cyberbullying, and many schools don’t have an internal policy to deal with cyberbullying that takes place off-campus,” offers Deutchman.  “It may take an unfortunate and tragic event on school property to get more schools to consider tackling electronic behavior that originates off campus.  It’s only a matter of time before a cyberbully, or the victim of cyberbullying, uses deadly force during school hours.”
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  • So, what should schools do in the meantime?  First, school officials should establish a consistent internal policy (much like a crisis plan) and a team (minimally made up of the principal, school counselor, and technology director) to deal with cyber-misconduct. This team should fully document disruptive incidents and the degree to which the learning environment is affected. The principal should invite the cyberbully’s parents to review the offending material before considering disciplinary action. Most parents at this point will do the right thing.
  • Second, schools should educate children, starting in elementary school, about the importance of cyber-safety and the consequences of cyberbullying, especially on the school’s own network. These rules should be clearly posted in the computer labs and written in age-appropriate language. The rules should be sent home to parents each year—and they should be posted prominently on the school’s website.
  • Third, teachers should continue incorporating in their curriculum projects that utilize the web and other powerful new technologies. This probably won’t help schools avoid lawsuits; it’s just good pedagogy. It’s not surprising that schools that keep up with the latest technology and software—and employ teachers who care about the quality of online communication—report lower incidents of cyber-misconduct.
  • In addition, schools should update their codes of conduct to include rules that can legally govern off-campus electronic communication that significantly disrupts the learning environment. They should also assign enough resources and administrative talent to deal with students who engage in cyber-misconduct. One very big caveat: Disciplining a student for off-campus electronic speech should be done only as a last resort, and certainly not before seeking legal counsel.
  • Finally, schools should realize that not all cyberbullies need to be disciplined. Schools should act reasonably, responsibly, and consistently—so as to avoid the very bullying behavior they are trying to curb. Until the courts provide clear standards in the area of off-campus electronic speech for young people, these recommendations will go a long way in making schools a safer learning environment for everyone.
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    Most school administrators have more than one story to tell about cyberbullying. They report that victims of cyberbullying experience low self-esteem, peer isolation, anxiety, and a drop in their grades. They note that victims may miss class or other school-related activities. Principals also point to recent high-profile cases where cyberbullying, left unchecked, led to suicide. In response, some schools have created new policies and curbed free speech on the school's computer network and on all electronic devices used during school hours. This article offers practical advice for actions schools can take to curb bullying, ranging from policy development to education.
Anne Bubnic

Board to return cell phones to students [Augusta Chronicle] - 0 views

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    With its evidence room overflowing with cell phones, the Richmond County school board is wanting to give away what it has taken 15 years to collect. The board decided to give the phones back to students when it changed its policy for cell phones in June. The policy replaces the often-criticized rule to seize phones for 365 calendar days when a pupil is caught with one. In 15 years, 5,725 phones were taken from students, according to the public safety department. Of those, 4,566 were still being held by the department this summer. Under the new rules, a parent has 10 days to claim a phone before it is turned in to public safety on the first offense. For a second offense and any phones not claimed at the school on the first offense, public safety takes the phone for 30 days.
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