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Janet Hale

Open Space Technology: Decision by Inclusion | Edutopia - 0 views

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    The first time I heard of Open Space Technology was in 2013 at the initial meeting of the Teacher Resistance and Action Network, a group of teachers and education practitioners who had gathered under the guidance of Dr. Thomas Poetter of Miami University to discuss how to teach responsibly in the age of high-stakes testing. My friend and mentor, Kevin Lydy, had invited me to attend what was billed as a non-conference. It was a life-changing experience, not only because of the great conversations that I had with fellow educators, but also because I learned about a technique that I'd never heard of before: Open Space Technology. Some Edutopia readers may be familiar with Edcamps, which are, in fact, based on (and utilize) OST. Edcamps, however, are geared toward collaborating across schools and districts, while this post will focus on using OST within a school (or even your own classroom) to realize similar benefits.
Janet Hale

Buy-in or Commitment? A Leader's Question - Leadership 360 - Education Week - 1 views

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    "We recently spent a day in a district with a highly experienced and motivated leadership team. They were exploring an interest in a district wide STEAM shift. On the team was a young, newly appointed elementary principal. With the simplicity of a beginner's eye, she asked us to clarify the difference between buy-in and commitment. It gave us reason to pause. We answered in the moment but the question has stayed with us. In educational change efforts, we frequently talk about...and seek...buy-in from our various constituencies. But there is a vast difference between buy-in and commitment. What if we sought commitment instead?"
Janet Hale

5 Ways to Use Scannable Tech in the Math Classroom | Edutopia - 0 views

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    "Scannable technology can totally alter the way that you think about teaching and learning in the math classroom. This powerful free and low-cost technology can support students inside and outside the classroom and change the way you think about interacting with content. QR codes and augmented reality are scannable technology tools that are perfect for K-12 math classrooms.

    A Quick Response (QR) code connects users to a link such as a website, YouTube video, or audio clip. Augmented reality (AR) layers digital content over the real world. There are a handful of apps that have pre-made AR experiences and a few tools that you can use to create your own. Once you explore these tools and understand their capabilities, scannable technology offers exciting possibilities for deeper learning."
Janet Hale

The 7 questions every new teacher should be able to answer | eSchool News - 1 views

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    "As I wrote in my last column, the traditional skill we have valued in teachers when paper was the dominant media-the ability to transfer knowledge of a subject-is becoming less important. Increasingly, a teacher's knowledge can be found online and in various learning styles. As the internet drives down the value of a teacher's knowledge, their ability to personalize learning with resources from around the world will increase. We will have more data generated about our students as we build out our online communities. We will need teachers who understand how to make meaning of this data to personalize learning for every student from a vast digital library of learning resources. Also, of increasing value is their ability to teach students to be self-disciplined about how "to learn to learn." Rather than losing overall value, teachers will be more important than ever.

    The big change is not adding technology to the current design of the classroom, but changing the culture of teaching and learning and fundamentally changing the job descriptions of teachers and learners.

    I offer seven questions we typically ask of teachers in the interview process, along with corresponding questions I think are geared to align with how the internet will force the redefinition of a teacher's added value..."
Janet Hale

cool tools for schools - Home - 3 views

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    TONS of Websites for all kinds of 2.0 tools
Janet Hale

Protocol Alphabetical List « School Reform Initiative - 0 views

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    Tons of ideas and strategies for meeting collaboratively realted to curriculum, instruction, and assessment
Janet Hale

Explore Easy to Use Teaching Tools This Summer - 1 views

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    "Regardless of what content area we teach, middle school educators are always on the hunt for free tools that get kids reading and thinking about the world around them".
Janet Hale

How A Strengths-Based Approach to Math Redefines Who Is 'Smart' | MindShift | KQED News - 0 views

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    "But what was so different about how these women learned math in high school? How did their math teachers form bonds so strong that years later they were attending students' weddings in Mexico?

    The answer: Complex Instruction. This pedagogy is not specific to math and has been in the literature for decades, originally researched by Elizabeth Cohen and Rachel Lotan at Stanford University. Teachers at Railside High discovered the methodology when they were undergoing an accreditation review and were told they needed to drastically change something to improve their results. The ultimatum prompted teachers to try something different - heterogeneous classes, high expectations for all students and, above all, approaching math with an eye to students' strengths."
Janet Hale

Help Students Close-Read Iconic News Images - 0 views

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    "Even before the invention of photography, certain images have gained iconic status in human culture. Our history and art textbooks are full of examples and many of them are etched in our memories.

    440px-Join_or_DieBenjamin Franklin's "Join or Die" snake image, said to be the first American political cartoon, originally appeared during the French and Indian War, was repurposed by Paul Revere in 1775, and continues to be a powerful representation of the movement toward U.S. independence and nationhood. More recent visual texts, from the Hindenburg disaster, to Iwo Jima, to MLK's "I Have a Dream" speech, to the haunting images of September 11, help us understand what "iconic" means in terms of cultural memory and messaging."
Janet Hale

How to Integrate Google Apps with the Rigor Relevance Framework | EdTech Magazine - 0 views

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    Educators like us across the globe are big fans Google Apps in the classroom. Through our work, we have seen Google Apps make learning more rigorous, relevant and engaging for students. We've watched Google Apps introduce and improve the digital skills that today's learners need for successful, sustainable careers in our digitized world - with one significant caveat: As with any technology used in the classroom, its power to transform is only as good as its strategic implementation.
Janet Hale

"Angry Birds" - A Lesson in Assessment FOR Learning | Kathy Perret - 0 views

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    "The Rationale and Overview goes on to state that "Assessment for Learning involves the following key actions: sharing learning intentions; sharing and negotiating success criteria; giving feedback to pupils; effective questioning; and encouraging pupils to assess and evaluate their own and others' work."

    So where does Angry Birds fit in? Let's breakdown the key actions [above] and compare"
Janet Hale

Using Global Feedback to Promote Growth Mindset - 0 views

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    Because of these experiences, I have a firm belief that my students also grow and achieve more when they learn to overcome obstacles and persevere. One way to encourage that can-do attitude is to invite others to recognize my students for their effort and success. Recognition from outside the classroom sparks something in students that leads to bigger and better things. I want to share a story about how that happened for me and my students this year.
Janet Hale

The Durango Herald 05/01/2016 | Animas High makes math, biology fun with escape room - 0 views

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    "Animas High School's Escape Room. And it might be the perfect entertainment for a spring evening.

    "Six geniuses can enter the room," said Aliza Cruz, a math teacher at AHS, "but if they can't work together, they probably won't get out."

    The origin of escape rooms is somewhat in dispute, but whether they began in Silicon Valley in 2006 or in Japan in 2007, they have spread around the world. Likened to a physical version of "escape-the-room" video games, they can be set to resemble such things as a space station or a dungeon."
Janet Hale

The Best Places To Get The "Same" Text Written For Different "Levels" | Larry... - 1 views

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    "Having the "same" text written for different levels of English comprehension can be a life-saver for a multi-level class of English Language Learners or for a teacher with a mainstream class that includes some students that are facing other challenges. They can be an important tool for differentiation."
Janet Hale

Using the Rule of Three for Learning | Edutopia - 1 views

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    "In math, the Rule of Three is a method of finding a ratio. In English essay writing, the Rule of Three states that things are more interesting to read in triads. In presentations, the Rule of Three comes in handy to keep the audience engaged, and in entertainment, the idea of trebling makes jokes and gags funnier.

    As it turns out, economists, chemists, aviators, and scuba divers use the Rule of Three (even Agatha Christie did when she wrote a series of plays entitled, The Rule of Three). Although it has not been labeled as the Rule of Three, great educators have used it in classrooms since Aristotle (ever heard of syllogisms?). So what is the Rule of Three for learning? Well it is as simple as one, two, three (not kidding). The Rule of Three for learning basically establishes the requirement that students be given the opportunity to learn something at least three times before they are expected to know it and apply it."
Janet Hale

ASCD Express 11.16 - Learning-Focused Feedback - 0 views

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    "As educators, we give feedback to students on their work all the time: in the moment, daily, weekly, and at the end of a unit or year. And research about formative assessment tells us that feedback is a foundational practice that makes a difference in student learning. But how can we make sure our guidance truly encourages our students' learning and growth at each interval? The literature includes some practical ideas to help us get there. It tells us that there is a continuum of feedback, which starts at one end with a focus on what's right or wrong. At the other end of the continuum, the type and amount of information provided turns the feedback into instruction. Let's take a look at three different feedback models derived from the literature and the insights we can take away from each one."
Janet Hale

Educational Leadership:Looking at Student Work:How I Learned to Be Strategic about Writ... - 0 views

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    "By setting up ways to get frequent feedback from students' works in progress, we can find out what they need-before it's too late.

    Several years ago, I decided that if I were going to spend time writing comments on my students' writing work or on assignments connected to their in-class reading, those comments had to do more than justify a grade. They had to give targeted feedback that would show students how to improve the quality of their work.

    I'd been finding the hours I spent writing feedback on students' work discouraging. For one thing, students didn't pay attention to my comments, and, for another, the quality of their work wasn't improving. A change in how I responded to their work was necessary.

    If I wanted my comments to fuel improvement, I realized, I had to build in time for learners to revise their work after receiving my suggestions. Not only did I change the timing of my feedback, but I also streamlined my process of writing comments, allowing myself more time to shift instruction in response to what I'd learned from reviewing work"
Janet Hale

School Climate: Ed. Dept. Provides Free Surveys, Resources to Schools - Rules for Engag... - 0 views

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    "The U.S. Department of Education released a free, web-based survey Thursday that schools can use to track the effectiveness of school climate efforts and resources on how to best improve learning environments for students.

    The surveys, developed with input from researchers and the department's office of safe and healthy students, can be administered to middle and high school students, staff, parents, and guardians, providing real-time data about their perceptions of the school environment."
Janet Hale

QR Codes Can Do That? | Edutopia - 0 views

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    "There are tons of quick and easy ways to integrate technology into your instruction -- with powerful results. I've been a fan of Quick Response (QR) codes in education for years and even wrote a book all about how they can be used to promote deeper learning in your classroom. When speaking to teachers about these black-and-white squares, it's so much fun to see the "aha" moments as we explore different ways to use scannable technology in the classroom."
Janet Hale

SE2R Can Revolutionize How We Assess Learning | AdvancED - 0 views

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    "This is how evaluation and reporting works in the student-centered classroom that I like to call a Results Only Learning Environment (ROLE). There is no room for numbers, percentages or letter grades in a ROLE. Instead, students collaborate with each other and with their teacher, in order to demonstrate mastery of various objectives contained in yearlong projects. Learning is a conversation built on a system of summary, explanation, redirection and resubmission - something all stakeholders in the classroom come to know simply as SE2R. If a report card is required, the student and teacher agree on what that final grade should be, based on how all feedback was handled throughout a grading period."
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