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Mathieu Plourde

Unpaywall: a search-engine for authorized, freely accessible versions of scholarly jour... - 0 views

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    "Unpaywall is a service that indexes open access repositories, university, government and scholarly society archives, and other sources that make articles available with authorization from the rightsholders and journals -- about 47% of the articles that its users seek."
Mathieu Plourde

Research shows professors work long hours and spend much of day in meetings - 0 views

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    "On average, faculty participants reported working 61 hours per week - more than 50 percent over the traditional 40-hour work week. They worked 10 hours per day Monday to Friday and about that much on Saturday and Sunday combined. Perhaps surprisingly, full professors reported working slightly longer hours both during the week and on weekends than associate and assistant professors, as well as chairs."
Mathieu Plourde

Why Professors Should Give a Damn - 0 views

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    "In August my brother-in-law died suddenly. All my in-laws live in New York, and I teach in Kansas, so I was gone for a week from all my classes. When I got back, I had a grieving husband and four classes to manage. In October my grandmother died in New Hampshire. Same deal. Four classes, grief. You know what I didn't expect? My colleagues to ask me to attend all my committee meetings, my dean to reprimand me for being absent to attend a funeral, or my students to be unforgiving when I had to miss a week of classes they were paying for."
Mathieu Plourde

what counts as academic influence online? - 0 views

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    "your concepts of academic identity and academic reputation do need to expand. Twitter and social media are now a part of scholarship, as modes of communication and of scholarly practice. So if I tell you I'm exploring the part they now play in academic influence…try not to arch so hard you hurt yourself."
Mathieu Plourde

Academic ghostwriting: to what extent is it haunting higher education? - 0 views

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    "I would endorse a profoundly different attitude to academic writing, one that recognises its role in the development of responsible academic individuals and communities. I would like academic writing to become more integrated, not outsourced to market forces or bolted on as a response to last-minute deadlines."
Mathieu Plourde

Conference Season Is Here. Don't Stink at Twitter. - 0 views

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    "But there's no getting around it: For those in the social-media know, conferences have taken something of a Ringling Brothers feel, with multiple layers of discussion competing for attendees' attention. More live tweeting means more noise, and-in the eyes of many conferencegoers and conference-followers-more nuisance."
Mathieu Plourde

If you are serious about climate change… stop attending conferences? - 0 views

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    "While this is hardly ever said, a sizeable fraction of government research funding goes toward paying expensive travel… because it is a nice perk. Lots of people love getting paid travel. And some of them like to travel to conferences where they will complain about how little is done against climate change…"
Mathieu Plourde

Why do academics blog? It's not for public outreach, research shows - 0 views

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    "After conducting this small study we have come to think about academic blogging in two ways. Firstly, many bloggers are talking together in a kind of giant, global virtual common room. Over at one table there is a lively, even angry, conversation about working conditions in academia in different parts of the world. In a different corner another group are discussing their latest research projects and finding common themes. Another table houses a group of senior and early career academics discussing how to land a book contract and write a good CV. There is also a meeting going on about public policy, and this involves a number of public and third sector people, as well as academics, who work in the area."
Mathieu Plourde

Who Are You, Really? - 1 views

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    "You have the power to shape the way others see you online, so it's wise to be a bit proactive. As a first step, Google yourself to see what others might find. Next, ask a couple of colleagues to describe the person they uncover when search for your name. Based on what you learn from Steps 1 and 2, begin to create, edit, or revamp your online content to craft the image you want to project."
Mathieu Plourde

How to make the most of academic conferences - five tips | Higher Education Network | G... - 1 views

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    "For the newer researcher like me, notwithstanding the delights of Cardiff, conferences are an opportunity for my thesis to face the scrutiny of the outside world; a vital part of joining the conversation of your academic peers, finding out where your research sits and gaining genuine feedback. Despite this promise, academic conferences are essentially esoteric and definitely not easy for the uninitiated. Nonetheless, I think I've found five simple rules that might be useful:"
Mathieu Plourde

Study points to gaps between how journalism educators and journalists view j-schools - 0 views

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    "Some 96 percent of journalism educators believe that a journalism degree is very important or extremely important when it comes to understanding the value of journalism. By contrast, 57 percent of media professionals believe that a journalism degree is key to understanding the value of their field."
Mathieu Plourde

My Initial Public Offering - 0 views

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    Why expose oneself to Internet trolls and conspiracy theorists? It doesn't "pay." It doesn't explicitly count for tenure or promotion. In fact, it puts one at risk of being labeled a popularizer or even being criticized by one's own colleagues as a less-than-serious scholar. But having opened the door to public engagement, I can't walk away now.
Mathieu Plourde

What's a Blog Post Worth? - 0 views

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    Which ultimately does more good-an article or monograph that is read by 20 or 30 people in a very narrow field, or a blog post on a topic of interest to many (such as grading standards or tenure requirements) that is read by 200,000? What if the post spurs hundreds of comments, is debated publicly in faculty lounges and classrooms, and gets picked up by newspapers and Web sites across the country-in other words, it helps to shape the national debate over some hot-button issue? What is it worth then?
Mathieu Plourde

I'm an academic, but I do other things - 0 views

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    "Working 24/7 is not the only way to achieve success in academia. There, I've said it. A recent article described the working week of people across academia. This included the science professor who "compensates for the time he spends with his young children in the evening and at weekends by getting up before they do", and the early career researcher who "tries to take at least a half-day off a week". While many colleagues have similar working patterns and are happy (or at least not unhappy) working in this way, I am meeting increasing numbers of promising academics who reject it."
Mathieu Plourde

MOOCs - massive open online courses: jumping on the bandwidth - 0 views

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    "Regardless of the goal of MOOCs - be it for profit or idealism - there are genuine educational concerns that need to be closely monitored. A course with 10,000 (or even 1,000) students enrolled cannot foster any significant discussion. Yes, teaching assistants (TAs) can be employed to groups of 100-200 students for online questions etc, but that may not be so simple. About 100 TAs would be needed for a modest-sized MOOC of 10,000 students. Even for the lecturer to organise 100 TAs would be a Herculean task. Another serious concern is evaluation. How can one evaluate 20,000 students taking a course? Yes, electronic quizzes and multiple-choice tests can be given to monitor progress - if the material is suitable for such types of questions. But what about material in the social sciences and humanities that might be harder to evaluate (than science) without essay-style answers? I've already seen that companies are attempting to write computer programs that will grade essays. But as one educator put it, how can a programmer include wit and style for evaluation in such a program?"
Mathieu Plourde

The Déjà Vu of Today's Application Files - 0 views

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    Your application package will determine whether you make the shortlist, and you are the one who controls what it looks like
Mathieu Plourde

The legitimacy and usefulness of academic blogging will shape how intellectualism develops - 0 views

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    "With this poorly articulated rationale in mind, I present first, some pros and cons to citing blogs within formal academic writing. Next, I put forth three main sub-questions that I think will help us-and by "us" I mean myself and the readers who grapple with the ethical and professional questions of rigor in standards of academic sourcing-organize our thoughts. "
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