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Op-ed: Creating a No Kill Norfolk | AltDaily : Creating and celebrating local culture i... - 0 views

  • in Norfolk, Virginia, seven out of 10 cats and almost half of all dogs are still being needlessly killed. Why? Because shelter officials are mired in the 19th century model of animal control based on an “adopt a few, kill the rest” mentality.
  • And we aim to change that.
  • We’ve requested that the City Council pass an ordinance requiring Norfolk to run its shelter in line with those of the most successful communities in the nation, by requiring simple, commonsense and cost-effective alternatives to killing that most animal lovers would be shocked to learn are not already being comprehensively implemented voluntarily.
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  • One of the proposals is to make it illegal for Norfolk shelters to kill animals using taxpayer money when qualified non-profit rescue organizations are willing to save them at private expense.
  • All it will require are foster care,
  • That number now stands at over 58,939—a 370% increase in annual lifesaving, all at no cost to taxpayers.
  • Another of the Norfolk proposals would end the practice of killing animals simply because the mandated stray holding period has passed.
  • Before the California law went into effect, only 12,526 animals were being transferred from shelters to rescue groups statewide every year.
  • working with rescue groups,
  • marketing and adoptions
  • Can anyone with even a hint of common sense or compassion actually say it is better to kill baby kittens than have volunteers bottle feed them?
  • Right now, excluding laws imposed by health departments regarding the use of controlled substances, the disposition of rabid and potentially aggressive animals and mandated holding periods, shelter directors in this country have essentially unlimited discretion as to how they operate their facilities.
  • They can exclude members of the community from volunteering.
  • They can prevent other non-profits, such as rescue groups and other shelters, from saving the lives of animals in their custody.
  • And when volunteers or rescuers go public with their concerns, they are terminated.
  • Where shelters are not willing to do these things voluntarily or do so on a limited basis when they should be doing it for every single animal, every single time, we must pass laws forcing them to do so.
  • when all you ever do is all you’ve ever done then all you’ll ever get is all you’ve ever gotten.
  • Doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result is the very definition of insanity.
pepa garcía

Wish You Were Here : Nathan J Winograd - 0 views

  • At a well run No Kill animal shelter, there are a variety of ways to respond to animals, depending on the reason that animal is in the shelter in the first place. There is not a one-size fits-all strategy of impound, holding period, adoption or killing, as is common in traditional, poorly run, high kill shelters. Each animal is treated as an individual, and the needs of every animal are addressed and met on a case-by-case basis.
  • When their animal control officers find lost animals in the field – they knock on doors or call the numbers on tags so that they can take the animal home instead of impound him/her.
  • If the animal is impounded, shelter staff is efficient at cross checking lost and found reports, so that the number of lost animals that are reclaimed by their people is much higher, and they have hours that allow people with lost pets to conveniently visit the shelter to reclaim them.
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  • Some animals entering a shelter are free-living cats. A No Kill shelter will spay/neuter and release those cats instead of kill them.  Likewise, injured animals will receive medical attention, and then go into foster homes, as will other sick animals, orphaned neonatals, and dogs with behavior issues that need rehabilitation. And, lastly, further reducing the number of animals a shelter has to find homes for are local rescue groups. These groups take some of the animals entering the shelter, and a well-run No Kill shelter considers such organizations valuable allies, and has a friendly, cooperative relationship with th
  • good adoption hours
  • offsite adoption venues,
  • the lack of programs, the lack of alternatives to killing.
  • the problem is not “pet overpopulation,” but a lack of imagination, commitment, and determination to treat each animal as an individual with distinct needs that must be met.
pepa garcía

CAPA Modified - Parvo is Not a License for Shelters to Kill « YesBiscuit! - 0 views

  • Parvo is preventable and treatable and every animal shelter has an obligation to both prevent and treat this disease.  Parvo in shelters is prevented through the practice of vaccination prior to or immediately upon intake, good housing practices and standard disease prevention cleaning protocols.  The disease is further prevented by ensuring the community’s dog owners have easy access to low cost vaccinations for their pets.
  • Treatment options for parvo dogs include in-house care if sufficient resources exist to provide isolation and appropriate veterinary care.  If the facility is not equipped to provide treatment, parvo dogs may be transferred to another shelter with appropriate facilities or to a private veterinary clinic.  Donations may be solicited from the public if necessary.  The media can help in educating the public and spreading the word about the shelter’s efforts to save lives.  The days of blanket killing of shelter dogs for parvo or exposure to the disease are over.
  • Killing dogs who have tested positive for parvo without providing treatment is unacceptable.
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  • Killing dogs who have not been tested or treated, who have been “diagnosed” by someone other than a veterinarian, who are asymptomatic but have been exposed or who are merely “suspected” of having the disease is also unacceptable.  What are your local shelter’s protocols for handling parvo dogs?
  • Austin Pets Alive has a ward set up for parvo dogs, run by volunteers.
  • Shelters who fail to vaccinate all animals prior to or immediately upon intake are failing to prevent the spread of disease.
  • Shelters who fail to utilize standard disease prevention cleaning protocols and/or maintain good housing practices are failing to prevent the spread of disease.
  • Prevention and treatment are not luxuries. 
pepa garcía

Supersize Me! | All American Vegan - 0 views

  • It may seem strange to you that we are imitating that which we claim to abhor. But regardless of what we might consider the ideal, Americans do not want to eat vegetables, whole grains, or any of the other “health” foods some vegans continually and detrimentally equate with veganism. Every measure we could possibly use—what Americans are eating, where they are eating, even how they are cooking (opening jars and microwaving contents)—reveals that Americans aren’t interested in eating better or healthier. And offering the average American a bell pepper instead of a veggie burger is a recipe for failure. And when their health is at stake, when lives are at stake, when the fate of the planet is at stake, failure is not an option.
  • Tofurky and Fakin’ Bacon and Boca Burgers and veggie dogs and all those foods some vegans dismiss as glorifying meat-eating are the animals’ saving grace.
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    Tofurky and Fakin' Bacon and Boca Burgers and veggie dogs and all those foods some vegans dismiss as glorifying meat-eating are the animals' saving grace.
    -------
    regardless of what we might consider the ideal, Americans do not want to eat vegetables, whole grains, or any of the other "health" foods some vegans continually and detrimentally equate with veganism. Every measure we could possibly use-what Americans are eating, where they are eating, even how they are cooking (opening jars and microwaving contents)-reveals that Americans aren't interested in eating better or healthier. And offering the average American a bell pepper instead of a veggie burger is a recipe for failure. And when their health is at stake, when lives are at stake, when the fate of the planet is at stake, failure is not an option.
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Does "free" adoptions equal bad homes? - Houston animal shelters | Examiner.com - 0 views

  • Given the free and anonymous supply of animals elsewhere, why would animal abusers make themselves known to the very agencies with enforcement powers against them? I might suggest, some screening, such as checking complaint lists, enforcement screens on Chameleon not just by name but address to see if there have been reported calls to that location.
  • Whether a person pays an adoption fee is not an accurate predictor of whether that person will be loving and responsible pet parent.
  •  
    Given the free and anonymous supply of animals elsewhere, why would animal abusers make themselves known to the very agencies with enforcement powers against them? I might suggest, some screening, such as checking complaint lists, enforcement screens on Chameleon not just by name but address to see if there have been reported calls to that location.
pepa garcía

Understanding the Culture of Cruelty : Nathan J Winograd - 0 views

  • I recently went to hear an author talk about his book on the neuroscience behind morality. He described how normally circumspect people turn off their natural compassion when placed in unnatural contexts. People we might consider “kind” or “decent” could be cruel when placed in a context in which cruelty is the norm. And what could be more unnatural than a typical U.S. animal control shelter which is little more than an assembly line of killing?
  • working at a shelter is a paycheck and nothing more to employees
  • The answer to that question can be found in the very nature of shelters themselves and the kind of people who apply to work in them.
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  • slaughterhouse workers had to make the animals unworthy of any consideration on their behalf. And the two most common methods of achieving this are indifference and showing sadistic behavior toward the animals.
  • to get there, many of them had to fire most of the existing staff; because the tragic fact is that animal shelters in the U.S. are designed for violence and the people in them are largely hired specifically to commit it.
  • The good news, of course, is that an increasing number of these shelters do align the ideal and the reality.
  • Killing is the ultimate form of violence.
  • But it is taking far too long, and too many animals are being subjected to systematic and unrelenting violence
pepa garcía

There are no 'alien' species on planet Earth - | Examiner.com - 0 views

  • They were cut down by so-called “environmentalists.” They were killed by those whose mission was supposed to be their protection. According to the local chapter of the Audubon Society, the trees were not “native” and had to be destroyed.
  • Invasion Biologists
  • believe that certain plants or animals should be valued more than others if they were at a particular location “first.”
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  • When the species that were there “first” are competing for habitat with a species that came later, they assert that the latter should be eradicated
  • In championing such views, the movement paradoxically has embraced the use of traps, poisons, fire, and hunting, even when these cause harm, suffering, and environmental degradation
  • In San Francisco, on the Channel Islands, all across the United States, plants and animals are being trapped, poisoned, hunted, burned, and destroyed by people who claim the mantel of environmentalism
  • And it is getting worse and increasingly violent, both in rhetoric (fish they don’t value are called “missiles with fins”) and in deeds.
  • Even the science writer for the New York Times has weighed in, suggesting mass killing and the eating of animals that do not pass the arbitrary litmus test of worthiness by environmentalists.
  • In a losing battle to return North America to a mythical state that existed before European colonization, they are proposing a slaughter with no end.
  • Is this really what environmentalism should be?
  • To assert that the world must remain as it is today and to act on that assertion by condemning to death those species who threaten that prevailing order, does not reject human interference in the natural world, it reaffirms it. 
  • An authentic environmentalism would not advocate that humans seek out and destroy living things for simply obeying the dictates of the natural world, such as migration and natural selection. 
  • It would not condone the killing of those plants and animals who find themselves in parts of the world where, for whatever arbitrary reason—be they economic, commercial, or aesthetic—some humans do not want them to be. An authentic environmentalism would recognize that such determinations are not for us to make, because in seeking to undo what nature inevitably does, we merely exacerbate suffering, killing and the destruction of natural places we claim to oppose, with no hope of ever gaining the ends we seek. It is to declare an unending war on nature and our home.
  • we put all living creatures, including ourselves, in danger as well
  • And just as disturbing, we open the floodgates of expression to our darker natures, by teaching others disdain and suspicion of the “foreign” and reverence for the familiar and the “native.”
  • The same forces of nature which created the world we live in today are shaping it even now.
  • Our actions, and our presence, being as much a part of that system as any other living thing that ever was, will shape and mold how that future will look
  • Yet there is no compelling reason to assert that any one outcome would be more preferable than any other.
  • Why is the starling less worthy of life and compassion than the spotted owl?
  • Why does the carp swimming gracefully in a Japanese Zen garden inspire peace and serenity, but when swimming with the same grace and beauty in Lake Michigan, such horror, disdain, and scorn?  Because some humans among us say it is so? Because they impact narrow aesthetic or commercial interests?
  • As perhaps the most intelligent and without a doubt the most resourceful species yet to evolve on our planet, humans have a moral obligation to ensure that we use our unique abilities for good, and not harm.
  • We are obligated to consider how our actions impact the other earthlings who share our home. And to determine, with all of our gifts of intellect and compassion, how we can meet our needs in the most generous and considerate means possible.
  • Sadly, as a species, we have yet to comprehensively and collectively determine how we might do this.
  • But that, in truth, is our most solemn duty, and the end every environmentalist should be seeking.
  • On a tiny planet surrounded by the infinite emptiness of space, in a universe in which life is so exceedingly rare as to render every blade of grass, every insect that crawls, and every animal that walks the Earth an exquisite, wondrous rarity, it is breathtakingly myopic, arrogant, and quite simply inaccurate to label any living thing found anywhere on the planet which gave it life as “alien” or “non-native.”  There is simply no such thing as an “invasive” species.
  • We must turn our attention away from the futile effort to hold or return our environment to some mythic state of perfection that never existed toward the meaningful goal of ensuring that every life that appears on this Earth is welcomed and respected as the glorious, cosmic miracle it actually is.
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