Skip to main content

Home/ PSU TLT/ Group items tagged psutlt

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Cole Camplese

Learning Technologies - Yammer - 2 views

  • Yammer enables co-workers to discuss ideas, post news, ask questions, and share links and other information. It’s your virtual watercooler that helps you get things done faster. Find answers to questions, connect with colleagues and learn more about what is going on around ECU on Yammer.
Cole Camplese

So When are We Getting an ANGEL Replacement, Anyway? - Onward State - 4 views

  • So there you have it. We’ll know for sure which course management system the University plans on using by the end of the year. Hopefully. Thank goodness, because we all know how much #ANGELsucks.
Chris Millet

Recording can improve a bad lecture! 7 surprising facts about recorded lectures - 4 views

  •  
    1. Students watch lots of recorded lectures at home 2. No technical problems 3. Watch lectures multiple times 4. Watch <75% of lecture 5. Would like to see ALL lectures recorded 6. Improves pass rate 7. Recording lectures improves bad lectures!
Cole Camplese

Google Announces Sweeping Accessibility Improvements for Visually Challenged Users - 1 views

  • Google has announced a new initiative to increase accessibility for visually challenged users on its major Web services. In advance of the upcoming school year, Google is rolling out accessibility improvements to Docs, Sites and Calendars. Google is hosting a live webinar for enterprise customers - which include educational institutions - on Wednesday, September 21 at 12:00 p.m. Pacific time.
Cole Camplese

Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning | In &quot;Piglet mode?&quot; Break open a New Fac... - 4 views

  • I thought my husband was a little crazy the day he bought bags and bags of emergency preparedness items for our home. We’re talking flashlights, a solar/battery/wind-up weather radio, bandages, blankets…you name it…all tucked into the closet under our stairs.
  • I tell that story because I think it’s applicable to new faculty. New faculty get thrown into the day-to-day course prep, research, advising, working with students, committee work, etc. and they don’t have time to prepare for the unexpected. Whether the unexpected is a minor flesh wound or a storm that damages nearby neighborhoods, new faculty may not be ready for those circumstances.
  •  
    Really smart idea ... might be worth considering as a partnership between TLT and Schreyer Institute?
  •  
    It's a creative idea. It reminds me of the finals week survival kits that parents could buy for their kids (through Residence Life). I like that it includes key phone numbers and a dry erase marker.
Cole Camplese

ELearning Platform Reviews - ETS - 3 views

  •  
    In early 2010, Cole Camplese, then Director of Education Technology Services at Penn State, created a Web site (hereafter referred to as the OCDM wiki) that invited University Park learning designers and administrators to provide a summary of their unit's online course development models in order to capture a snapshot of practice at Penn State's main campus. In Summer 2010, an invitation was sent to the entire learning design community at Penn State to elicit the same information for other campus locations.  In January 2011, Ann Taylor, Assistant Director of the Dutton e-Education Institute in the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences and Chair of the Senate Outreach Committee, joined Camplese in his efforts to gather and analyze information about University-wide course development models. Several additional invitations were made to the University community, asking learning designers and administrators to update and/or to add their unit's online course development model summary to the OCDM wiki.
John Dolan

Social Media's Slow Slog Into the Ivory Towers of Academia - 2 views

  •  
    Underpinning a disdain for social media in higher education is the assumption that incoming students have an inherent aptitude for new technologies "If you took a soldier from a thousand years ago and put them on a battlefield, they'd be dead," Howard Rheingold, a professor teaching virtual community and social media at Stanford University, told me one morning via Skype.
  •  
    A shoutout to Chris Long for finding this first!
Cole Camplese

Sharing Student Notes - Work and Stuff - 1 views

  • I think it would be cool to add a link in our new LMS where students could share their class notes online with the other students in the class. A rating system could percolate the best notes to the top and a search feature could possibly return a page of student notes using that word or phrase.
  •  
    Interesting idea ... I've seen a lot of these kinds of features proposed in the emerging eText area.
  •  
    GradeGuru is specifically designed to do this. http://www.gradeguru.com/home We took a look at it. Interesting idea - ratings of quality notes and note takers with the ability for top performers to earn real rewards. They proposed a cost of something like $2/enrollment/semester though - just not a model that would work for us.
Cole Camplese

Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 1 views

  • Sprint officials reasoned that colleges would flock to the free version of the software, Mobile Learn. And because only Sprint customers could use the software with Android, BlackBerry and Palm phones, college students would have a powerful incentive to sign up with Sprint.
    • Cole Camplese
       
      Really? Students would "flock to the free version of the software" ... if you've used the software, I don't quite know if that is the "f word" I'd use to describe it.
  • Sprint asked a judge to bar Blackboard from allowing its free iPhone and iPad versions to use wireless networks.
    • Cole Camplese
       
      You know, for the kids.
  • The exact amount is unclear, but Sprint will eventually owe more than $50-million that it has not already paid, Blackboard said in a court document. Sprint must pay Blackboard $2 per month for every student who has downloaded Mobile Learn for Sprint, in addition to millions in other fees, the document says.
Cole Camplese

DTLT Today - 3 views

  •  
    Jealousy. Dave Stong was always pushing us to do a video version of ETS Talk. As usual, he was right.
  •  
    We have so many posts to Diigo every week that it's not like we'd run out of topics. It's all a matter of time and priorities. Plus you know how much I love podcasting - I've been writing about it non-stop for two weeks now.
bkozlek

1DollarScan - 3 views

  •  
    Send them a book and for 1 dollar (per 100 pages) they will convert it to an OCRed PDF for you. 
  •  
    I'd like to try this. What book shall we send?
  •  
    Imagine sending in your personal handwritten notebook. As for a "real" book to send, I have no idea. I do have a copy of "Perfect Phrases For Documenting Employee Performance Problems" lying around. What about content for the next go of ci597 on disruptive tech?
bkozlek

Announcing AWS GovCloud (US) - 1 views

  • Announcing AWS GovCloud, a new AWS Region designed to allow U.S. government agencies and contractors to move more sensitive workloads into the cloud by addressing their specific regulatory and compliance requirements. Previously, government agencies with data subject to compliance regulations such as the International Trade and Arms Regulation (ITAR), which governs how organizations manage and store defense-related data, were unable to process and store data in the cloud that the federal government mandated be accessible only by U.S. persons. Because AWS GovCloud is physically and logically accessible by U.S. persons only, government agencies can now manage more heavily regulated data in AWS while remaining compliant with strict federal requirements.

    The new Region offers the same high level of security as other AWS Regions and supports existing AWS security controls and certifications such as FISMA, SAS-70, ISO 27001, and PCI DSS Level 1. AWS also provides an environment that enables agencies to comply with HIPAA regulations. AWS resources deployed from AWS GovCloud such as Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2), Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) and Amazon Virtual Private Cloud (Amazon VPC) are available on-demand and agencies pay only for what they use, allowing the U.S. government to benefit from the flexibility, scalability and low pay-as-you-go pricing of AWS. Customers who are interested in learning more about the AWS GovCloud should contact their government sales representative by filling out the Contact Us form on the AWS GovCloud website.
  •  
    Just a reminder that it might be possible to do business in the cloud and comply with regulations. 
Cole Camplese

Virtual and Artificial, but 58,000 Want Course - NYTimes.com - 1 views

  • A free online course at Stanford University on artificial intelligence, to be taught this fall by two leading experts from Silicon Valley, has attracted more than 58,000 students around the globe — a class nearly four times the size of Stanford’s entire student body.
  • The three online courses, which will employ both streaming Internet video and interactive technologies for quizzes and grading, have in the past been taught to smaller groups of Stanford students in campus lecture halls. Last year, for example, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence drew 177 students.
  • How will the artificial intelligence instructors grade 58,000 students? The scientists said they would make extensive use of technology. “We have a system running on the Amazon cloud, so we think it will hold up,” Dr. Norvig said.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Dr. Widom said that having Stanford courses freely available could both assist and compete with other colleges and universities. A small college might not have the faculty members to offer a particular course, but could supplement its offerings with the Stanford lectures.
  •  
    Amazing trend happening with open and online courses. This is the second one of these I have heard about in a week. Maybe we need to try something similar with CI597?
  •  
    good discussion about this course from CS faculty. they bring up some excellent points and have a healthy skepticism about the project: http://computinged.wordpress.com/2011/08/18/stanford-on-line-ai-course-draws-58000-but-is-it-real/
Cole Camplese

Summit explores uses of technology in the classroom - The Daily Collegian Online - 1 views

  • The College of the Liberal Arts teamed up with Educational Technology Services and University Libraries to offer LASTS, a day of panels and peer-to-peer discussions centered on incorporating technology with both teaching and research.
Cole Camplese

&quot;Narrate, Curate, Share:&quot; How Blogging Can Catalyze Learning -- Campus Technology - 1 views

  • "Narrate, Curate, Share" is the framework in place for the upcoming fall semester as the Virginia Tech Center for Innovation in Learning partners with Tech's new Honors Residential College to bring 21st-century innovation to the tradition of residential learning with a program-wide blogging initiative.
  •  
    well thought out and beautifully communicated vision for an educational blogging platform. Blogs@psu has had the motto, "create, reflect, connect". If I could take the liberty to translate Campbell's phrase into the lingo bandied about at PSU, it would be "reflect, meta-reflect, connect".
gary chinn

Will a Harvard Professor's New Technology Make College Lectures a Thing of the Past? - ... - 3 views

  • Mazur sold attendees at the recent Building Learning Communities conference on this new approach by first asking them to identify something they're good at, and then having them explain how they mastered it. After the crowd shared, Mazur pointed out that no one said they'd learned by listening to lectures. Similarly, Mazur said, college students don't learn by taking notes during a lecture and then regurgitating information. They need to be able to discuss concepts, apply them to problems and get real-time feedback. Mazur says Learning Catalytics enables this process to take place.
  •  
    anyone familiar with Learning Catalytics? sounds like it's invite-only, but might be worth a look.
  • ...2 more comments...
  •  
    I saw something else along these lines at ELI this year (I'll have to look up the notes). It was mostly about organizing students into discussion groups and assigning them a topic, role, position on the issue, etc... I could see us doing a hot team on several of these technologies.

    But about the flipping the classroom part of this article, we'll probably open a "Flip the Classroom" engagement initiative this fall to explore multiple approaches to creating the class preparation materials and in-class activities. Some of this is related to the Kahn Academy discussions we've been having. Some touch the lecture capture software that faculty could run in their offices to create personal captures going over material or key points. Anyway, I'd like to open this up to the creativity across Penn State and see what approaches people propose.
  •  
    Awesome article! This is very similar to the way we are designing the modules for our NIH project. Allan, I would love to be part of "Flip the Classroom" engagement initiative this fall. If there is anything I can do please let me know.
  •  
    an engagement initiative seems like a good idea. many of the approaches are implementations of active learning strategies, and I think having faculty from multiple disciplines exploring and sharing is a good way to test the effectiveness of various approaches.

    we just met with faculty from architectural engineering who've been flipping since 2008. one observation they made was that they flipped to allow student teams to work on group projects during class time. I had always thought that was a good idea for logistical purposes (especially in a team-heavy college like engineering), but they made a point I had not thought of: using classroom flip in that manner also allowed for the teams to have access to faculty advice and guidance while they were meeting to work on their projects. that seems like it may have huge benefits, especially at key points in a group assignment.

    all a long way of saying, there's much to learn. the blended learning initiative was essentially a 'classroom flip' approach as well, so some of the ways faculty adapted instruction for those courses might be relevant here too.
  •  
    Angela: Let's talk about it.

    Gary: Tapping into first-hand experience would be great. I know a bit from the National Conference on Academic Transformation conference. The example that comes to mind is a flip where students learn about math through some short (5 minute) video tutorials and then attend "class" in a lab environment to work in teams and get access to the GA and faculty. It taps into a lot of the features of "student engagement" as measured by the National Survey on Student Engagement with factors such as increased student-student work, collaborative problem solving, immediate feedback, and increased student-faculty contact. Overall, an excellent design.
Cole Camplese

Designing a big news site is about more than beauty » Nieman Journalism Lab »... - 2 views

  •  
    Lessons for the TLT website?
1 - 20 of 65 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page