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Major Research Instrumentation Program - 0 views

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    The Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program serves to increase access to multi-user scientific and engineering instrumentation for research and research training in our Nation's institutions of higher education and not-for-profit scientific/engineering research organizations. An MRI award supports the acquisition or development of a multi-user research instrument that is, in general, too costly and/or not appropriate for support through other NSF programs. MRI provides support to acquire critical research instrumentation without which advances in fundamental science and engineering research may not otherwise occur. MRI also provides support to develop next-generation research instruments that open new opportunities to advance the frontiers in science and engineering research. Additionally, an MRI award is expected to enhance research training of students who will become the next generation of instrument users, designers and builders. An MRI proposal may request up to $4 million for either acquisition or development of a research instrument. Beginning with the FY 2018 competition, each performing organization may submit in revised "Tracks" as defined below, with no more than two submissions in Track 1 and no more than one submission in Track 2.rack 1: Track 1 MRI proposals are those that request funds from NSF greater than or equal to $100,000. Track 2 MRI proposals are those that request funds from NSF greater than or equal to $1,000,000 up to and including $4,000,000.Consistent with the America COMPETES Act of 2007 Cost sharing of precisely 30% of the total project cost is required for Ph.D.-granting institutions of higher education and for non-degree-granting organizations.
MiamiOH OARS

Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers ... - 0 views

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    Inclusion across the Nation of Communities of Learners of Underrepresented Discoverers in Engineering and Science (NSF INCLUDES) is a comprehensive national initiative designed to enhance U.S. leadership in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) discoveries and innovations focused on NSF's commitment to diversity, inclusion, and broadening participation in these fields. The initiative is developing a National Network composed of NSF INCLUDES Design and Development Launch Pilots, NSF INCLUDES Alliances, NSF-funded broadening participation projects, other relevant NSF-funded projects, scholars engaged in broadening participation research, and other organizations that support the development of talent from all sectors of society to build the STEM workforce.
    To facilitate the Network's operation, the program is soliciting proposals for a NSF INCLUDES Coordination Hub that will drive and support the work of the NSF INCLUDES National Network over the lifecycle of the initiative by: (a) promoting the NSF INCLUDES guiding vision and strategy; (b) developing a collaborative infrastructure to support the activities of the various entities partnering in the NSF INCLUDES National Network; (c) fostering progress among Network partners toward shared models, measurement practices, and evaluation criteria; (d) communicating the discoveries of and generating enthusiasm for the NSF INCLUDES National Network; and (e) advancing the expansion and scale of the NSF INCLUDES National Network by connecting expertise from multiple sectors and other private and public funders.
MiamiOH OARS

Computational Social Science | RSF - 0 views

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    Social science research on many topics has often been hampered by the limitations of survey data. However, the digital age has rapidly increased access to large and comprehensive data sources such as public and private administrative databases, and unique new sources of information from online transactions, social-media interactions, and internet searches. New computational tools also allow for the extraction, coding, and analysis of large volumes of text. Advances in analytical methods for exploiting and analyzing data have accompanied the rise of these data. The emergence of these new data also raises questions about access, privacy and confidentiality.

    The Russell Sage Foundation's initiative on Computational Social Science (CSS) supports innovative social science research that brings new data and methods to bear on questions of interest in its core programs in Behavioral Economics, Future of Work, Race, Ethnicity and Immigration, and Social Inequality. Limited consideration will be given to questions that pertain to core methodologies, such as causal inference and innovations in data collection.
MiamiOH OARS

Validation of survey questions to distinguish type 1 and type 2 diabetes among adults w... - 0 views

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    Most survey-based prevalence estimates of type 1 diabetes among adults have been based on self-reported information about a young age at diagnosis (e.g.,30 years and 40 years) and insulin use within a year of diagnosis. However, this estimation approach misses type 1 diabetes in adults with older age of onset and may misclassify some cases of type 2 diabetes as type 1 if insulin use begins soon after diagnosis. The major goal of this project is to evaluate the validity of survey questions (or algorithms based on them) to distinguish between adults (aged 18 years of age) with type 1 and type 2 diabetes in a representative sample of adult diabetic patients in a diabetes patient registry or database. Using a gold standard, validity will be assessed by examining the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of algorithms to identify type of diabetes across demographic strata such as age, sex, and race. A secondary goal is to validate definitions of type of diabetes using electronic health records.
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