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Melissa Hughes

Everything you need - Bio Business - March 2013 - 0 views

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    Everything you need to help your biotech company can be found in Toronto and MaRS. 
Melissa Hughes

SME deal sees thaw in UAE-Canada relations - ArabianBusiness.com - September 13, 2012 - 0 views

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    The UAE's Ministry of Economy and Canada's MaRS Discovery District of Toronto, Ontario, and Sustainable Development Technology - Canada (SDTC) signed separate memorandums of understanding (MoU) to establish strategic partnerships, the WAM news agency reported.
Melissa Hughes

MoE, Canada sign MoUs for SME promotion - Gulf Today - September 13, 2012 - 0 views

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    The UAE's Ministry of Economy (MoE) and Canada's MaRS Discovery District of Toronto, Ontario, and Sustainable Development Technology - Canada (SDTC) signed separate memorandums of understanding (MoUs) to enhance business ties. The strategic partnership is aimed at fostering innovation and accelerating growth of small and medium enterprises (SMEs), in accordance with the UAE's strategy to build competitive knowledge-based economy. 
Cathy Bogaart

Fundica.com - Find Funding in Canada - 0 views

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    A database of public and private funding information for Canadian businesses - for free.
Karen Schulman Dupuis

Teens tackle startup boot camp - 0 views

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    Led by Joe WIlson of MaRS, our Future Leaders program was well received by many in the startup community...

    "The pitch session was the culmination of  MaRS's inaugural Future Leaders Series which offered 20 students between the ages of 13 and 15 the chance to experience the life of a "MaRs-ian entrepreneur."
Assunta Krehl

Why artists in the c-suite can drive business - The Globe and Mail - June 7, 2012 - 0 views

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    According to James Martin, reporter, The Globe and Mail, "businesses looking to become innovators might even consider hiring an MFA instead of an MBA.". "David Dobson, Director of business development for Victoria-based StarFish Medical, art school gives him a simple business edge: "It changed the way I think." "Dobson often travels to Toronto and to the MaRS Discovery District."
Assunta Krehl

IABC Toronto OVATION Awards - PR in Canada - May 31, 2012 - 0 views

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    MaRS Discovery District won a Communication Management - Social Media award from the International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) Toronto OVATION awards.
Karen Schulman Dupuis

How a small startup can attract a big partner - The Globe and Mail - 0 views

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    Founded in 2009 and launched late in 2010, Locationary Inc. is a Toronto-based company that synchronizes local business information from many different sources and broadcasts it to diverse kinds of customers. Its mission is "managing the world's local data."
Karen Schulman Dupuis

Locationary finds $2.5-million in financing - The Globe and Mail - 1 views

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    Locationary Inc., which is dedicated to improving the quality of local business data for mobile and web content, has secured $2.5-million from new investors, including the Investment Accelerator Fund and Trellis Capital. Existing investors Extreme Venture Partners, Plazacorp Ventures, Angels and Management were also involved in the financing.
Miri Katz

Canada slips further in innovation rankings - 0 views

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    Canada is now a mid-level player in the global innovation race, passed by rising powers China and South Korea in some categories and falling further behind long-time rivals such as the United States, Germany, Norway and Sweden.
Cathy Bogaart

Ontario Business Program Guide - 1 views

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    A directory of information for Ontario government tax credits, incentives and programs for business. Search about 60 programs across 11 different ministries in one spot.
Assunta Krehl

MaRS Discovery District: Nitric Oxide Symposium - Type A Events - March 24, 2010 - 0 views

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    Type A Events is proud to be part of the coordination team for the Nitric Oxide Symposium presented by MaRS Discovery District and NeurAxon taking place on May 27th and 28th, 2010.
Tim T

How to Make Wealth - 0 views

  • Remember what a startup is, economically: a way of saying, I want to work faster. Instead of accumulating money slowly by being paid a regular wage for fifty years, I want to get it over with as soon as possible. So governments that forbid you to accumulate wealth are in effect decreeing that you work slowly. They're willing to let you earn $3 million over fifty years, but they're not willing to let you work so hard that you can do it in two. They are like the corporate boss that you can't go to and say, I want to work ten times as hard, so please pay me ten times a much. Except this is not a boss you can escape by starting your own company.
  • What is technology? It's technique. It's the way we all do things. And when you discover a new way to do things, its value is multiplied by all the people who use it. It is the proverbial fishing rod, rather than the fish. That's the difference between a startup and a restaurant or a barber shop. You fry eggs or cut hair one customer at a time. Whereas if you solve a technical problem that a lot of people care about, you help everyone who uses your solution. That's leverage.

    If you look at history, it seems that most people who got rich by creating wealth did it by developing new technology. You just can't fry eggs or cut hair fast enough. What made the Florentines rich in 1200 was the discovery of new techniques for making the high-tech product of the time, fine woven cloth. What made the Dutch rich in 1600 was the discovery of shipbuilding and navigation techniques that enabled them to dominate the seas of the Far East.
  • What a company does, and has to do if it wants to continue to exist, is earn money. And the way most companies make money is by creating wealth. Companies can be so specialized that this similarity is concealed, but it is not only manufacturing companies that create wealth. A big component of wealth is location. Remember that magic machine that could make you cars and cook you dinner and so on? It would not be so useful if it delivered your dinner to a random location in central Asia. If wealth means what people want, companies that move things also create wealth. Ditto for many other kinds of companies that don't make anything physical. Nearly all companies exist to do something people want.

    And that's what you do, as well, when you go to work for a company. But here there is another layer that tends to obscure the underlying reality. In a company, the work you do is averaged together with a lot of other people's. You may not even be aware you're doing something people want. Your contribution may be indirect. But the company as a whole must be giving people something they want, or they won't make any money. And if they are paying you x dollars a year, then on average you must be contributing at least x dollars a year worth of work, or the company will be spending more than it makes, and will go out of business.

    Someone graduating from college thinks, and is told, that he needs to get a job, as if the important thing were becoming a member of an institution. A more direct way to put it would be: you need to start doing something people want. You don't need to join a company to do that. All a company is is a group of people working together to do something people want. It's doing something people want that matters, not joining the group.
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  • When wealth is talked about in this context, it is often described as a pie. "You can't make the pie larger," say politicians. When you're talking about the amount of money in one family's bank account, or the amount available to a government from one year's tax revenue, this is true. If one person gets more, someone else has to get less.

    I can remember believing, as a child, that if a few rich people had all the money, it left less for everyone else. Many people seem to continue to believe something like this well into adulthood. This fallacy is usually there in the background when you hear someone talking about how x percent of the population have y percent of the wealth. If you plan to start a startup, then whether you realize it or not, you're planning to disprove the Pie Fallacy.

    What leads people astray here is the abstraction of money. Money is not wealth. It's just something we use to move wealth around. So although there may be, in certain specific moments (like your family, this month) a fixed amount of money available to trade with other people for things you want, there is not a fixed amount of wealth in the world. You can make more wealth. Wealth has been getting created and destroyed (but on balance, created) for all of human history.

    Suppose you own a beat-up old car. Instead of sitting on your butt next summer, you could spend the time restoring your car to pristine condition. In doing so you create wealth. The world is-- and you specifically are-- one pristine old car the richer. And not just in some metaphorical way. If you sell your car, you'll get more for it.

    In restoring your old car you have made yourself richer. You haven't made anyone else poorer. So there is obviously not a fixed pie. And in fact, when you look at it this way, you wonder why anyone would think there was.
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