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Michael Wacker

Blogging to improve children's writing | Literacy Resources - 3 views

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    Many teachers are now using blogging with their pupils or students. There are a whole range of types of blog post and these can be used to develop a range of writing styles and text types particularly in non-fiction writing. These ideas have been taken from the slideshow The 25 Basic Styles of Blogging by rohitbhargava.
Michael Wacker

ict games - 1 views

  • This site provides educational ICT activites linked to the English National Curriculum. All games are designed, made by and © copyright 2005 of James Barrett. These games are generally targeted at infant school teachers and parents of infant age children.
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    This site provides educational ICT activites linked to the English National Curriculum. All games are designed, made by and © copyright 2005 of James Barrett. These games are generally targeted at infant school teachers and parents of infant age children.
Michael Wacker

Check out these Great Reading Websites - 5 views

  • Check out these Great Reading Websites!

    This is a list assembled by teachers across the state. FRA is passing this information on for you to use. 

J Black

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:Orchestrating the Media Collage - 1 views

  • New media demand new literacies. Because of inexpensive, easy-to-use, widely distributed new media tools, being literate now means being able to read and write a number of new media forms, including sound, graphics, and moving images in addition to text.
  • New media coalesce into a collage. Being literate also means being able to integrate emerging new media forms into a single narrative or "media collage," such as a Web page, blog, or digital story.
  • New media are largely participatory, social media. Digital literacy requires that students have command of the media collage within the context of a social Web, often referred to as Web 2.0. The social Web provides venues for individual and collaborative narrative construction and publication through blogs and such services as MySpace, Google Docs, and YouTube. As student participation goes public, the pressure to produce high-quality work increases.
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  • Historically, new media first appear to the vast majority of us in read-only form because they are controlled by a relatively few technicians, developers, and distributors who can understand or afford them. The rest of us only evolve into writers once the new media tools become easy to use, affordable, and widely available, whether these tools are cheap pencils and paper or inexpensive digital tools and shareware.
  • Thus, a new dimension of literacy is now in play—namely, the ability to adapt to new media forms and fit them into the overall media collage quickly and effectively.
  • n the mid 1960s, Marshall McLuhan explained that conventional literacy caused us to trade an ear for an eye, and in so doing, trade the social context of the oral tradition for the private point of view of reading and writing. To him, television was the first step in our "retribalization," providing a common social experience that could serve as the basis for dialogue in the global village.2 

    However, television told someone else's story, not ours. It was not until Web 2.0 that we had the tools to come full circle and produce and consume social narrative in equal measure. Much of the emerging nature of literacy is a result of inexpensive, widely available, flexible Web 2.0 tools that enable anyone, regardless of technical skill, to play some part in reinventing literacy.

  • What is new is that the tools of literacy, as well as their effects, are now a topic of literacy itself.
  • Students need to be media literate to understand how media technique influences perception and thinking. They also need to understand larger social issues that are inextricably linked to digital citizenship, such as security, environmental degradation, digital equity, and living in a multicultural, networked world. We want our students to use technology not only effectively and creatively, but also wisely, to be concerned with not just how to use digital tools, but also when to use them and why.
  • The fluent will lead, the literate will follow, and the rest will get left behind.
  • They need to be the guide on the side rather than the technician magician.
J Black

» AYKM? Texting Improves Literacy » Blog Archive   Alice Hill's Real Tech New... - 0 views

  • AYKM (are you kidding me)? No, contrary to popular belief, text message-speak or textisms actually improve language skills, according to a recent study. No, RLY (really).
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    AYKM (are you kidding me)? No, contrary to popular belief, text message-speak or textisms actually improve language skills, according to a recent study. No, RLY (really).
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