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Ian Forrester

MU News Bureau | If Facebook Use Causes Envy, Depression Could follow - 0 views

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    Users should be aware of why people use Facebook to avoid feelings of envy
Ian Forrester

Tow Center: Platforms and Publishers: A Definitive Timeline - 0 views

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    The timeline below identifies key developments on tech platforms used by journalism publishers. Here you can explore the significant shifts in the platform landscape as these companies adjust to new relationships with publishers.
Ian Forrester

The latest 'South Park' game is hardest if you choose a black character - 0 views

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    South Park writers Trey Parker and Matt Stone haven't ever really shied away from social commentary (president Donald Trump notwithstanding) and that doesn't look like it's changing with the upcoming South Park: The Fractured but Whole. When creating your character in the make-believe superhero game, Eurogamer discovered that the darker the skin tone you choose, the more the difficulty level ramps up. "Don't worry, this doesn't affect combat, just every other aspect of your life," perpetual jerk Eric Cartman says in voiceover.
Ian Forrester

New AI can guess whether you're gay or straight from a photograph - 0 views

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    An algorithm deduced the sexuality of people on a dating site with up to 91% accuracy, raising tricky ethical questions
Ian Forrester

Inaudible ultrasound commands can be used to secretly control Siri, Alexa, and Google N... - 0 views

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    Is your digital assistant taking orders behind your back? Scientists from China's Zheijiang University have proved it's possible, publishing new research that demonstrates how Siri, Alexa, and other voice-activated programs can be controlled using inaudible ultrasound commands.
Ian Forrester

London cops urged to scrap use of 'biased' facial recognition at Notting Hill Carnival ... - 0 views

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    London's Metropolitan Police have been urged to back down on plans to once again use facial recognition software at next weekend's Notting Hill Carnival.

    Privacy groups including Big Brother Watch, Liberty and Privacy International have written to police commissioner Cressida Dick (PDF) calling for a U-turn on the use of the tech.

    Automated facial recognition technology will snap the party-goers' faces, and run them against a database. The aim is to alert cops to people who are banned from the festival or are wanted by the police, presumably so they can take immediate action.

    The tech was first tested at the festival - where relations between police and revellers are often strained - last year, but it failed to identify anyone.
Ian Forrester

Philips' Hue lights will soon sync with movies, games and music - 0 views

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    To celebrate its fifth birthday, Philips is extending the compatibility of its smart lights to sync with media
Ian Forrester

All the Secret Stuff That Happens When You Visit Google.com - 0 views

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    All the Secret Stuff That Happens When You Visit Google.com
Ian Forrester

Roombas have been busy mapping our homes, and now that data could be up for sale - The ... - 0 views

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    "Over the past couple of years, Roombas haven't just been picking up dust and chauffeuring cats around, they've also been mapping the layout of your home. Now, Colin Angle, the chief executive of Roomba maker iRobot, has said he wants to sell the data from these maps in order to improve the future of smart home technology."
Ian Forrester

Home Assistant - 0 views

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    " Home Assistant is an open-source home automation platform running on Python 3. Track and control all devices at home and automate control. Perfect to run on a Raspberry Pi. "
Ian Forrester

Biased Algorithms Are Everywhere, and No One Seems to Care - MIT Technology Review - 0 views

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    "The big companies developing them show no interest in fixing the problem."
Ian Forrester

Vibrator Maker To Pay Millions Over Claims It Secretly Tracked Use : The Two-Way : NPR - 0 views

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    The makers of the We-Vibe, a line of vibrators that can be paired with an app for remote-controlled use, have reached a $3.75 million class action settlement with users following allegations that the company was collecting data on when and how the sex toy was used.

    Standard Innovations, the Canadian manufacturer of the We-Vibe, does not admit any wrongdoing in the settlement finalized Monday.
Ian Forrester

Bose headphones have been spying on customers, lawsuit claims - The Washington Post - 0 views

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    At least that's the claim of a proposed class-action lawsuit filed late Tuesday in Illinois that accuses the high-end audio equipment maker of spying on its users and selling information about their listening habits without permission.
Ian Forrester

How Facebook's tentacles reach further than you think - BBC News - 0 views

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    "Facebook's collection of data makes it one of the most influential organisations in the world. Share Lab wanted to look "under the bonnet" at the tech giant's algorithms and connections to better understand the social structure and power relations within the company. "
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