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Karl Wabst

Defining Privacy - 0 views

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    One of the things I notice while reading about privacy issues today is the lack of a definition of the term privacy. How can we make laws, regulations, and instantiate frameworks or intelligently discuss this privacy thing, if we cannot be sure we are talking about the same thing?
    I thought explori
Karl Wabst

Web tracking has become a privacy time bomb - USATODAY.com - 1 views

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    The purpose for all of this online snooping is singular: Google, Microsoft, Yahoo, Apple, Facebook and others are intent on delivering more relevant online ads to each and every one of us - and bagging that advertising money.
Karl Wabst

TRUSTe Blog » The Time Is Now To Address Consumer Concerns Regarding Online A... - 0 views

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    But what do consumers think about behavioral advertising? Our research uncovered a variety of consumer privacy perspectives on behavioral advertising, some expected, some, surprising. Here are my five, high-level research takeaways:

    1. In the absence of education, consumers assume the worst
Karl Wabst

Don't Look Now: Classic Disruption Is Taking Place In Advertising | DigitalNext: A Blog... - 0 views

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    Clayton Christensen first identified the concept of the disruptive innovation in the Innovator's Dilemma. The basic idea is this: a new technology slowly undermines an existing, dominant technology, by starting out cheaper and "worse," then slowly improving until it is a full replacement for the dominant one, but with newer, more flexible capabilities, and usually a lower cost basis. Classic examples of disruptive technologies include the PC (which disrupted mainframes and minicomputers) and desktop publishing (which disrupted the print industry).
Karl Wabst

MediaPost Publications Mobile Payments Growth Slower Than Expected 07/22/2011 - 0 views

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    In advanced markets, the firm believes the promise of mobile payments driven by NFC technology is at least four years away from reaching mass adoption. "The biggest hurdle is the need to change user behavior by convincing consumers to pay with mobile phones instead of cash and cards," said Sandy Shen, research director at Gartner.
Karl Wabst

MediaPost Publications While You're Here: Crafting the 'Following Salesman' 07/22/2011 - 0 views

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    If done artfully and well, mobile media and technology is capable of reversing a century-old model of selling -- where salespeople went to people's homes or waited for interested consumers to come to them. In some ways, mobile replaces the traveling and in-store salesmen with the newer (albeit slightly creepy) model of the "following salesman."
Karl Wabst

In Wake of '09 Data Mergers, Hyper-Targeting to Take Shape in 2010 - ClickZ - 0 views

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    "The last quarter of 2009 should be partly remembered in the advertising community as a juncture when big agencies -- namely Omnicom Media Group, The Nielsen Company, and WPP -- announced consumer data mergers. The deals entailed the marriages of offline and online data and appeared to reveal a potentially major stepping stone in the evolution of "hyper-targeting."

    Some of the agencies have trumpeted their newfound ability to create consumer segments related to behavioral elements such as "passion points" (e.g., shown interest in electronics, photography, fantasy football, etc.), as well as geographic location, beverage preferences, favorite social media sites, activity levels at the sites, and so on.

    Augustine Fou, group chief digital officer for Omnicom's Healthcare Consultancy Group and a ClickZ columnist, said that while increased hyper-targeting would likely result from the data marriages, unresolved issues remain before the use of combined online/offline data is widely adopted by brands.

    "For example, as diverse data sets begin to be integrated, it will become painfully apparent what data can be integrated -- or not -- and specific tradeoffs will have to be made to move forward," he explained. "In particular, privacy policies of sites and ad networks will need to be revisited."

    The growing ability for marketers to target online ads using data gathered offline has generally raised concern among consumer privacy advocates. To that end, Fou suggested that brands are cautiously optimistic about hyper-targeting and slightly wary of public/consumer perception. "
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    Marriage of offline and online data sources to target advertising may make tracking more interesting for consumers and advertisers alike.
Karl Wabst

Ad Industry Works on Ads About Ads - Digits - WSJ - 0 views

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    "Madison Avenue has joined forces with Internet companies in a last-ditch attempt to stop privacy regulations over the $29 billion online-ad industry.

    The industry is finalizing an ad campaign to educate consumers about how digital advertising works, creating an icon that would appear on Web pages or ads alerting consumers if their activity is being tracked and deploying new technologies to police the Web for illegal activities. At issue is the practice of tracking consumers' Web activities - from the searches they make to the sites they visit and the products they buy - for the purpose of targeting ads.

    The efforts follow calls from the FTC earlier this year for Web advertisers and Internet companies to do a better job explaining how they track and use information about consumers' Web activities and creating a simple way consumers can opt out of being tracked.

    Meanwhile, scrutiny in Washington continues to build. Lawmakers and regulators have broadened their scope beyond the Internet and are starting to examine privacy practices for a wider swath of media and technologies, from mobile phones and newfangled interactive TV commercials to telephone pitches and the advertisements consumers receive in their mailboxes."
Karl Wabst

MediaPost Publications Study: Consumers Equate BT With 'Privacy Harm' 11/17/2009 - 0 views

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    "For more than a decade, Web companies have said that behavioral targeting, or tracking people anonymously as they navigate around the Internet and then serving them targeted ads, doesn't harm users. On the contrary, they argue, such targeting benefits people by providing them with more relevant messages, and also lets marketers spend their ad dollars more efficiently.

    When privacy advocates complain about behavioral targeting techniques, industry executives tend to respond by condemning the critics as ivory-tower elitists. But new research is increasingly casting doubt on the idea that the average consumer doesn't care about behavioral targeting. "
Karl Wabst

Are retailers going too far tracking our Web habits? - USATODAY.com - 0 views

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    "Sherry Natoli is followed everywhere she goes while shopping online, but she doesn't mind at all.

    Natoli, who owns a seashell business in Tampa, does all but her grocery shopping on the Internet and even opts in whenever she's asked whether she's willing to have her online movements tracked by websites."

    Companies have been monitoring our online behavior for almost as long as there's been an Internet, often using our online footsteps (cookies) whenever we search, browse or buy online. Tracking technology has advanced so much that everything from how long we linger over a product description to whether we are searching for sexual-dysfunction drugs can be collected and stored on individual profiles. Our profiles are numeric descriptions, not our real names, but in some cases, it's not hard to determine personal information behind the numbers.

    Privacy concerns abound, and several privacy and consumer groups are urging Congress to enact laws on what can and can't be collected and for how long.
Karl Wabst

Panel to vote on data privacy measure - Nextgov - 1 views

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    The House Energy and Commerce Committee is slated to vote Wednesday on legislation that would require strong security policies from firms that collect and store individuals' sensitive information and provide for nationwide notification in the event of a data breach.

    The bill was sponsored by House Energy and Commerce Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection Subcommittee Chairman Bobby Rush, D-Ill., and was tweaked to win his panel's approval in June, but more revisions are expected.
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    The House Energy and Commerce Committee is slated to vote Wednesday on legislation that would require strong security policies from firms that collect and store individuals' sensitive information and provide for nationwide notification in the event of a data breach.

    The bill was sponsored by House Energy and Commerce Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection Subcommittee Chairman Bobby Rush, D-Ill., and was tweaked to win his panel's approval in June, but more revisions are expected.
Karl Wabst

Consumer Groups Launching Online Privacy Push - 2009-08-28 14:00:00 EDT | Broadcasting ... - 0 views

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    Look for almost a dozen consumer groups and privacy advocates to launch a full-court press on targeted behavioral advertising and online privacy on Capitol Hill next week.

    According to a source, those groups on Sept. 1 will release a background paper, letters to House members and other documents to make their case for stronger government oversight of online marketing targeted to kids.

    "A growing number of child advocacy and health groups have called on the FTC and Congress to prohibit the behavioral targeting of both children and teens, next week, many leading consumer and privacy groups will send a letter to congressional leaders calling for similar safeguards," confirms Jeff Chester, executive director of the Center for Digital Democracy.

    Chester saidd that 10 groups will be involved in the push, and that they will be "pressing Congress to write legislation that truly protects consumer privacy, but enables online marketing to flourish in a more responsible fashion."

    The effort comes as Congress prepares to return from its summer break. House Communications Subcommittee Chairman Rick Boucher (D-Va.) has made an online privacy bill a legislative priority in this session of Congress.
Karl Wabst

Ads Follow Web Users, and Get Deeply Personal - NYTimes.com - 0 views

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    For all the concern and uproar over online privacy, marketers and data companies have always known much more about consumers' offline lives, like income, credit score, home ownership, even what car they drive and whether they have a hunting license. Recently, some of these companies have started connecting this mountain of information to consumers' browsers.
Karl Wabst

Lawmakers Blast Internet Data Collection - WSJ.com - 0 views

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    Internet companies came under fire on Capitol Hill on Thursday, with lawmakers questioning how well the companies protect information that they collect online about consumers for advertising purposes.

    "I think it's a big deal if someone tracks where you go and what you look at without your personal approval. We wouldn't like that in the non-Internet world and I personally don't like it in the Internet world," said Rep. Joe Barton (R., Texas).

    Lawmakers in the House are drafting Internet-privacy legislation designed to provide consumers more information about what is being collected online and to give them greater control about how that data can be used. It could also set rules for how consumers could prevent their personal data from being shared with advertisers.

    "Consumers are entitled to some baseline protections in the online space," said Rep. Rick Boucher (D., Va.) chairman of the House Internet subcommittee.
Karl Wabst

Hunch wants you to give it some ideas - Los Angeles Times - 0 views

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    Hunch.com helps users search for answers -- but first, it performs a detailed search on the users themselves.

    Launching today after a year in development, Hunch aims to supply users with computer-generated advice on thousands of lifestyle and consumer questions: What kind of dog should I buy? What should I get dad for Father's Day? Which book by George Orwell would I like?

    Most important, though, Hunch is not a search engine. Rather than scouring the open Web for information, as Google, Microsoft's new Bing and scores of others do, or collating written opinions, as Amazon.com does, Hunch computes answers by comparing what it knows about you to what it knows about people like you.

    "Ultimately, what we're doing is providing a kind of shortcut through human expert systems," said Hunch founder Caterina Fake, who also started Flickr.com, the popular photo-sharing site that was acquired by Yahoo in 2005.

    By first inviting users to answer as many as 1,500 questions about themselves -- an addictive kind of personality test that involves such diverse questions as political orientation, relationship status and whether you believe in UFOs and keep your closet organized -- Hunch looks to assemble a demographic profile whose depth could rival anything in the commercial universe.

    The New York company also believes that users stand to benefit from this kind of large-scale data farming -- not just from getting better answers, but also from discovering the many microdemographics to which they belong. Hunch also says it will not sell user data to marketers.

    But this promise, written into the site's privacy policy, is not precisely a legal contract, said Siva Vaidhyanathan, a new-media scholar at the University of Virginia, and the difference leaves the data it collects in a fuzzy domain.
Karl Wabst

Internet Ad Group: Pols Should Be Careful With Privacy Rules - Business Center - PC World - 0 views

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    Behavioral targeting is not bad as a concept but advertisers would have the public opt-in by default without knowing what is being collected and what it is being used for. On the other hand not many in the public seem very concerned about this subject.
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    The Internet contributes about US$300 billion a year to the U.S. economy, and U.S. lawmakers should be careful about tinkering with the advertising-supported Internet content model in the name of privacy, the Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) said.

    An IAB-commissioned study by two Harvard University professors, released Wednesday, found that 1.2 million U.S. residents are directly employed in Internet-related jobs, and another 1.9 million U.S. jobs support those Internet workers. IAB released the study Wednesday, as 30 publishers of small Web sites converged on Washington, D.C., to urge U.S. lawmakers to avoid passing legislation that would harm their ad-supported business models.

    Chief among those publishers' concern was talk in the U.S. Congress about requiring Web sites to gain opt-in permission from users before tracking their Web habits as a way to deliver personalized advertising to them. Many users wouldn't give the permission, and without offering targeted advertising, many small Web sites could fold, some small publishers said.

    Small Web publishers and sellers "are the face of small business" in the U.S. in recent years, said Susan Martin, publisher of Ikeafans.com, a home improvement site.
Karl Wabst

Microsoft, Google Cautiously Endorse Privacy Bill - 0 views

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    Top attorneys for Microsoft and Google today reiterated their companies' support for tougher government rules to protect consumer privacy. But when it comes to the details, some watchdog groups say they are concerned that Web firms will continue to fight against specific provisions that would limit the ways they can collect and use people's information to serve more targeted ads.

    Today's panel discussion, held here at the Computers, Freedom and Privacy conference, revisited a longstanding policy debate over the government's role in online privacy. The talk ran along some familiar plotlines, with Jeff Chester of the Center for Digital Democracy thundering about the detailed personal profiles being assembled by advertising companies who are using neuroscience to manipulate consumer behavior, while industry representatives assured the audience that their data-collection practices are benign, not to mention essential to providing free content and services on the Internet.

    But this wasn't just an idle debate. Rep. Rick Boucher, the Virginia Democrat who chairs a House subcommittee on the Internet, is developing legislation that could seek to impose sweeping restrictions on behavioral targeting. A few blocks up Pennsylvania Avenue at the Federal Trade Commission, the principal regulatory agency with authority over online advertising, newly minted Chairman Jon Leibowitz has spoken often about the need for industry to get serious about privacy.

    "The FTC's central concern here is transparency, consumer control," said Jessica Rich, assistant director of the agency's privacy and identity protection division. "We don't think consumers really know what's happening with their data."
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    Advertisers are your friend, and the government is here to help. If consumers don't take responsibility for their data, then all the regulation in the World won't matter.
Karl Wabst

Time to Talk Privacy? :: MinOnline - 0 views

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    Is it time for Web publishers and their users to have the privacy talk? At most Web sites, privacy policies are ridiculously long and convoluted scrolls of legalese that only a hearty privacy watchdog would read. For most users it remains a mystery just how publishers collect, use and share the data trails consumers leave behind while traversing a site. But publishers now are partnering more deeply with third party ad networks who plant their own cookies in their users' browsers and hit them again with ads out on their own networks with other publishers. How should a site broach the topic of privacy and ownership of data with its own customers?

    The industry-funded Future of Privacy Forum is hoping to get at this issue in a new research initiative that explores different ways sites can communicate with users about their online advertising experience and how a use's data trail is recorded and used. The study will try to find ways that publishers can raise user awareness about the use of online behavioral data and be more transparent about how it is harvested and shared.

Karl Wabst

Targeting Smackdown: Behavioral vs. Contextual - 0 views

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    As online shopping becomes a greater force each year, the behavior of online shoppers becomes more and more scrutinized. Ad net AudienceScience, a key scrutinizer, announced today the findings of a commissioned study conducted on its behalf by JupiterResearch designed to measure the receptiveness of online shoppers to behavioral targeting.
    And the survey says: They like it -- at least that they are more responsive to ads that are behaviorally targeted than those that are contextually targeted. And they were pretty clear about it, with 65 % responding that they are more receptive to BT, and only 35% saying they paid more attention to contextual ads.

    "Since its inception, behavioral targeting has been an evolution of contextual advertising, and these findings are testament to its power to more effectively engage with consumers on their own level," said Marla R. Schimke, VP of Marketing, AudienceScience. "If we conduct the same study in a year, five years, ten years, I believe we'll see this already substantial gap between the two continue to widen as more and more brands and marketers realize that they can use behavioral targeting to specifically target their ideal customer."
Karl Wabst

Lawmakers Examine Privacy Practices at Cable, Web Firms - WSJ.com - 0 views

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    Lawmakers took aim at privacy practices of cable and Internet providers Thursday at a House subcommittee hearing, laying the groundwork for the introduction of legislation that could restrict companies' ability to target ads at consumers online.

    The focus of the hearing was on new efforts by Internet providers to collect and share data on consumers' behavior to target online advertising and by cable companies to target ads at subscribers via their set-top boxes.

    Lawmakers are concerned about consumer privacy as cable, phone and Internet companies experiment with Internet-based technologies that pinpoint advertising to consumers in new and more accurate ways. Legislation to impose tougher privacy rules could be coming later this summer.
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