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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Stop letting Big Cable abuse our privacy! - 0 views

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    "The FCC is about to vote on rules that make it harder for Comcast and other big cable companies to exploit and profit off our personal data-information about our location, what websites we have visited, and other critical info. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Europe's 'Net Neutrality' Could Allow Torrent and VPN Throttling - TorrentFreak - 0 views

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    " By Ernesto on October 22, 2015 C: 65 News Next week the European Parliament will vote on Europe's new telecoms regulation which includes net neutrality rules. While the legislation is a step forward for many countries, experts and activists warn that it may leave the door open for BitTorrent and VPN throttling if key amendments fail to pass. "
Paul Merrell

No Fake Internet - 0 views

  • Zuckerberg's Internet.org will control what billions do online People in countries like India,1,2,3 Zimbabwe,4 Brazil,5 and Paraguay6 are speaking out about Facebook's so-called Internet.org platform and its ability to control what billions of Internet users can do online.7,8   Zuckerberg's partnership with telecom giants, Internet.org, provides access to a fake Internet where selected services are prioritized over others.9 This scheme threatens innovation,10 free expression,11 and privacy online12   It blocks many of the websites, apps, and services the world loves from being made available on equal terms.13   The fake Internet will also restrict access to local service providers struggling to get a foothold online.14   We all deserve access to the real open Internet. Stand with people around the world demanding Zuckerberg stops restricting access to the open Internet.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Wall Street Journal Upset That Wall Street Isn't Upset About Net Neutrality | Techdirt - 0 views

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    [... noted that the stocks of the big broadband companies actually went up suggesting that Wall Street actually knows that reclassification won't really impact broadband companies, despite what they've been saying publicly. ...]
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    [... noted that the stocks of the big broadband companies actually went up suggesting that Wall Street actually knows that reclassification won't really impact broadband companies, despite what they've been saying publicly. ...]
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    [... noted that the stocks of the big broadband companies actually went up suggesting that Wall Street actually knows that reclassification won't really impact broadband companies, despite what they've been saying publicly. ...]
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

The FCC's Historic Day: Voting Yes For Net Neutrality, Voting No On Protectionist S... - 0 views

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    Today was, no hyperbole intended, probably one of the more historic -- albeit at times one of the dullest -- days in FCC history. The agency, led by a former lobbyist for the cable and wireless industries few expected anything from, bucked a myriad of...
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Big Telecom tried to kill net neutrality before it was even a concept | Ars Technica - 0 views

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    "Opinion: Millions spent on campaigns, lobbying in bid to avoid common carrier label. by Donny Shaw Feb 15, 2015 6:00 pm UTC"
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    "Opinion: Millions spent on campaigns, lobbying in bid to avoid common carrier label. by Donny Shaw Feb 15, 2015 6:00 pm UTC"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Researchers Uncover Government Spy Tool Used to Hack Telecoms and Belgian Cryptographer... - 1 views

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    "Though no one is willing to speculate on the record about Regin's source, news reports about the Belgacom and Quisquater hacks pointed a finger at GCHQ and the NSA." [#! Can't ask for compliance when you do not comply]
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    "Though no one is willing to speculate on the record about Regin's source, news reports about the Belgacom and Quisquater hacks pointed a finger at GCHQ and the NSA." [#! Can't ask for compliance when you do not comply]
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Torrents Good For a Third of all Internet Traffic in Asia-Pacific | TorrentFreak [1/3...] - 0 views

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    " Ernesto on November 20, 2014 C: 0 News New data published by the Canadian broadband management company Sandvine reveals that BitTorrent can be credited for one-third of all Internet traffic in the Asia-Pacific region during peak hours. That's an increase of more than 50% compared to the previous year." [ # aka 1/3 of Internet income... # ! ... comes from #sharers... # ! this is a collective action to be considered as 'The #Culture' # ! that has to be '#protected'... [culture The arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/culture] # ! Consider the Money regularly injected by this group -through # ! monthly fees- on the Internet itself...] # ! 1 out of every 3 Dollars come from sharers...
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    " Ernesto on November 20, 2014 C: 0 News New data published by the Canadian broadband management company Sandvine reveals that BitTorrent can be credited for one-third of all Internet traffic in the Asia-Pacific region during peak hours. That's an increase of more than 50% compared to the previous year." # ! 1 out of every 3 Dollars come from sharers...
Paul Merrell

The End of the Internet As We Know It - 2 views

  • We owe everything we love about the Web to net neutrality, the principle that the Internet is an open platform and service providers like AT&T, Comcast, and Time Warner can’t dictate where you go and what you do online. Without net neutrality, the Web would look a lot like cable, with the most popular content available only on certain tiers or with certain providers. (Imagine AT&T as the exclusive home of Netflix and Comcast as the sole source of YouTube.)
  • In 2010, the Federal Communications Commission tried to establish concrete rules to protect net neutrality. But the agency ended up caving to pressure from the biggest phone and cable companies and left huge loopholes standing in the way of a truly open Internet. And now Verizon is in court challenging those rules — and the FCC’s authority to draft and enforce them to protect consumers and promote competition. That’s because under the Bush administration, the FCC decided to give away much of its authority to oversee our broadband networks. The current FCC could fix the problem by reclaiming this authority, but it hasn’t yet. If the FCC loses the case and fails to take the necessary action to reverse course, the agency will be toothless as the biggest Internet providers run amok and destroy everything we love about the Internet. Indeed, the second it looks like the FCC is going to be defeated, you can expect all the telecoms and ISPs to join hands and declare they’ve reached an agreement to self-regulate.
  • If this happens, they’ll win and we’ll lose. Online privacy will be a thing of the past. (If you thought it already was, believe me, things could get worse.) The ISPs will try to read all of your content so they can sell you to advertisers. New “troll tolls” will force content creators and others to pay discriminatory fees just to reach people online — and will require the rest of us to pony up for “premium” content. Does that sound Orwellian? That’s because it is. But this is no far-fetched scenario. It’s time for us to stand up and fight for our online rights. We need to tell the FCC to stop messing around. It’s time for the agency to fix its past mistakes — and establish strong net neutrality protections that are 100 percent loophole-free.
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