Skip to main content

Home/ ecycle/ Group items tagged washington

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Amy Cade

News - Making It: Elizabeth Wilmot Takes Out Your E-Trash - washingtonpost.com - 0 views

  •  
    Elizabeth Wilmot's parents, like many from the "Greatest Generation," never let anything go to waste: They saved string and wrapping paper and purchased used cars. So perhaps it's not surprising that Elizabeth, a former international marketing executive, would establish a company dedicated to...
Amy Cade

Computer Recycling, Recycling ewaste, Electronics Recycling | Turtle Wings - 0 views

  •  
    A company that picks up electronics, destroys the data, then recycles the part. It has a no landfill policy. The owner was featured in a Washington Post article.
Amy Cade

Manufacturer Interstate Takeback System Debuts in Washington to Responsibly Recycle Ele... - 0 views

  •  
    VISTA, Calif./EWORLDWIRE/Aug. 11, 2009 --- E-World Online today announced the debut of the Manufacturer Interstate Takeback System (MITS). Conceived and developed by E-World Online, with direction from Sony Electronics, the system will perform multiple functions: tracking the collection, transportation and responsible recycling of household, small business and small government electronics waste in various extended producer responsibility (EPR) programs throughout the U.S.
Joy Scrogum

Tracking trash - MIT News Office - 0 views

  •  
    7/15/09. Article on Trash Track, a project of the MIT SENSEable City lab that uses microprocessors to track the movement of various types of waste through an urban waste stream for the analysis of patterns and assessment of disposal costs. Seattle, WA and NYC are pilot projects in the U.S.; tracking will also occur in London, England in the U.K.
Joy Scrogum

Where, Exactly, Does Your Garbage Go After You Toss It out? - 0 views

  •  
    Scientific American, 7/17/09, article by Larry Greenemeier. Most people assume that their trash ends up in a landfill somewhere far away (if they think about this at all). But growing concern over the environmental impact of waste-discarded electronics, in particular-has prompted a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to take a high-tech approach to studying exactly what people are tossing out and where those items are ending up. The researchers, part of MIT's Senseable City Lab, have developed electronic tags that they're hoping as many as 3,000 volunteers in Seattle and New York City will affix to different items they throw away this summer as part of the Trash Track program. These tags will contact cell phone towers they pass as they flow through the trash stream to their final destinations, helping the researchers monitor the patterns and costs of urban disposal.
Jack Olmsted

Local News | Free e-cycling off to strong start in Northwest | Seattle Times Newspaper - 0 views

  •  
    Oregon and Washington have collected almost 5 million pounds of electronic waste since their free recycling programs went into effect in January.

    The free recycling applies to TVs, monitors and computers, both desktops and laptops.

    Oregon reported about 1.5 million pounds collected in January, ahead of the 12.2 million pounds projected for the year. Washington said residents brought in slightly less than 3.3 million pounds, establishing a pace that would far exceed the state's projection of 25 million pounds for 2009.

    Officials, however, expect the pace to taper off a bit. People appeared to stockpile a large amount of electronics while waiting for the program to start Jan. 1. "Our recyclers told us they were just inundated at first," said Kathy Kiwala, manager of Oregon's electronics program for the Department of Environmental Quality.

    "The activity continues to be strong but not like it was the first two weeks," she said.

    Oregon and Washington have collected almost 5 million pounds of electronic waste since their free recycling programs went into effect in January.

    The free recycling applies to TVs, monitors and computers, both desktops and laptops.

    Oregon reported about 1.5 million pounds collected in January, ahead of the 12.2 million pounds projected for the year. Washington said residents brought in slightly less than 3.3 million pounds, establishing a pace that would far exceed the state's projection of 25 million pounds for 2009.

    Officials, however, expect the pace to taper off a bit. People appeared to stockpile a large amount of electronics while waiting for the program to start Jan. 1. "Our recyclers told us they were just inundated at first," said Kathy Kiwala, manager of Oregon's electronics program for the Department of Environmental Quality.

    "The activity continues to be strong but not like it was the first two weeks," she said.

Jack Olmsted

The Wenatchee World Online - Talking trash: Remember to e-cycle e-waste - 0 views

  •  
    Let's talk about electronic waste, better known as
    e-waste.








    STORY TOOLS









































    Years ago, if a toy or appliance broke, your mom or dad would
    try to fix it, often with mixed results. But few people understand how
    e-products work, much less how to fix them.

    When televisions and computers first came out, old ones were
    often passed down to relatives, charities or to schools. But now, lower prices
    and rapid development in technology are sending more and more televisions and
    computers to the e-waste trash heap.

    Just how many?

    In 1970, the average household in Washington averaged one
    television set per household, and personal computers were unheard of.

    The Department of Ecology estimates that by the end of 2008
    there will be one television for every person in the state and even more
    computers than people.
Jack Olmsted

E-Cycle Washington Coordinates Collection | Environmental Protection - 0 views

  •  
    E-Cycle Washington, a new program that started on Jan. 1, allows free and
    convenient recycling of TVs, desktop and laptop computers, and monitors only,
    according to a Jan. 12 press release.

    The makers of these products are providing about 200 collection sites around
    the state. State residents, small businesses, school districts, small government
    agencies, and charities can bring these electronic items to the sites.

    The program is
Jack Olmsted

Lawmaker aims to tweak electronics recycling law - 0 views

  •  
    A state law that just went into effect to encourage recycling of electronics
    needs some tinkering to make sure it doesn't inadvertently bankrupt businesses
    that fix old computers, says a state legislator whose South Seattle district
    includes several computer-refurbishing shops.

    The law allows consumers to recycle computers, computer monitors, laptops and
    TVs for free. In effect as of Thursday, it is being hailed as groundbreaking
    nationally because it marks the first time a state has forced electronics
    manufacturers to pay the entire cost of the recycling.

    But there's a big problem with the law, according to environmentalists as
    well as the computer refurbishers: It puts a big hurdle in the way of the
    computer rebuilders.
Jack Olmsted

KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA | E-Recyle Your Electronics - 0 views

  •  
    Richland, Wash-- If
    you have an old
    T.V. or computer to get rid of think, before you put it in
    your garbage. It's not illegal for households to put electronics in their trash,
    but it could be dangerous for ground water around landfills.

    All
    businesses are required to E-Cycle their electronics.
    If you take your
    electronics to the Richland Landfill they will dispose them for free.
    They
    have already shipped six truck loads so far.
Jack Olmsted

KXLY.com: News, Weather and Sports for Spokane, WA and Coeur d'Alene, ID | Got an old T... - 0 views

  •  
    SPOKANE -- If you have old electronics collecting dust at home there's a free
    and green way in Washington now to get rid of all that unwanted clutter.

    Many of the electronics people use on a daily basis contain lead and mercury
    making it harmful to just toss them into a landfill. That's why a new state law
    requires makers of televisions, computers, laptops, and monitors to provide free
    e-cycling facilities.
Jack Olmsted

Law makes recycling electronics easier - Living - The Olympian - Olympia, Washington - 0 views

  •  
    Do you have an old TV, laptop or monitor? Now you can easily recycle it for free, thanks to a new state law.

    The E-Cycle Washington program requires manufacturers to provide recycling services for TVs, desktop computers, laptop computers and monitors at no cost to residents, nonprofits, small businesses, schools and local governments.

    "The law puts the responsibility of end-of-life disposal costs on the manufacturer, rather than the resident or local government. This is important because recycling is a very expensive process," said Terri Thomas, education and outreach specialist for Thurston County Solid Waste.

    Before, residents either had to rely on Thurston County's twice-a-year Community Recycle Days or seek out other options, usually at their own expense, Thomas said.

    Perhaps that's why electronics are the fastest-growing waste stream, she said.
Jack Olmsted

E-Cycling Gets Free and Easier in Washington - 0 views

  •  
    Whenever I hear "E-Cycling," I think of some amazing new technology that allows
    you to shoot your old trash and junk over to the recycling plant by means of
    e-mail. Of course, it isn't - "E-Cycling" is simply the term used for recycling
    and managing potentially hazardous electronic waste, and,
    thanks to a new
    state law passed in Washington
    , managing that waste is about to become a
    whole lot more pleasant.
Jack Olmsted

Reduce, Reuse, E-cycle « Choose MOGO - 0 views

  •  
    E-waste has been in the news a lot lately, with the 60 Minutes expose on toxic electronic waste illegally shipped to other countries, and reports from organizations like the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition, who recently traveled to India to track the global e-waste crisis. People are starting to pay more attention to where their electronics go when we lose interest in them.
Jack Olmsted

E-Cycle Washington brings free recycling of TVs, monitors and computers - 0 views

  •  
    OLYMPIA - If you're wondering what to do with those unwanted TVs, computers
    and monitors stored in a garage or back-room, relief is here. E-Cycle Washington
    is a new program that started on Jan. 1. It allows free and convenient recycling
    of these electronic products.

    The makers of these products are providing about 200 collection sites around
    the state. State residents, small businesses, school districts, small government
    agencies and charities can bring television sets, computers (desktop and laptop)
    and monitors to these sites to be recycled. They will pay no fee for this
    service.

    There is no need to rush out this weekend - or even this month. E-Cycle
    Washington is a permanent and ongoing addition to current recycling
    opportunities available to Washington residents. Many collection sites will be
    open several days a week and some will be open every day. And the collection
    network will be continuously improved to meet the needs of the public.
Jack Olmsted

KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA | Why Do Some E-Cycling Drop-Off Spots Cost Money? - 0 views

  •  
    Our newsroom has received a number of calls and e-mails asking why if the
    State Department of Ecology is promoting free e-cycling, some people are being
    asked to pay anywhere from $5-15.


    We hopped online to the Department of Ecology's website.
    It turns
    out
    stores like Staples and Office Depot charge you money for what's called
    a drop-off box; you buy a box and can fill it with electronic recyclables.

    We talked to Office Depot, and they tell us they charge the money for shipping
    and the state's new ecology law does not affect them.
Jack Olmsted

E-Cycling in Olympia | OlyBlog - 0 views

  •  
    Donating E-Cycle material to Goodwill helps in two ways: supporting
    Goodwill's job-training and placement efforts; and through sales at our retail
    stores, having a greater chance to reuse computers instead of having them end up
    in the waste stream. Donations to Goodwill are, of course, tax-deductible and
    Goodwill also will accept peripherals, keyboards, cel phones and other
    electronic equipment.
Jack Olmsted

e-Recycling Gets a New Year Boost in North West : TreeHugger - 0 views

  •  
    Oregon e-Cycles has
    a great website
    up for consumers to help guide them through the whys and
    hows of e-cycling. If you live in the area, simply
    type in your zip
    code
    and you're given a listing of local collection points. Oregon has
    another item that will launch next New Year's Day: on January 1, 2010, disposal
    of computers, monitors and TVs
    will be banned
    .

    Also launching on this New Years Day was
    Washington's new
    program
    letting people drop off certain e-waste items for free. They too
    have a
    search database for
    finding a local drop-off point
    , as well as a call-in hotline.
1 - 20 of 50 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page