Skip to main content

Home/ ecycle/ Group items tagged ecycle

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Jack Olmsted

The Electronics Recycling Superguide - Features by PC Magazine - 0 views

  •  
    Consumer electronics-including TVs, computers, peripherals,
    audio equipment, and phones-make up almost 2 percent of the municipal solid
    waste stream, according to the
    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
    . This percentage may seem
    small and inconsequential, but the quantity of electronic waste is steadily
    rising.



    In fact, the
    EPA
    estimates that the number of obsolete consumer electronics
    sold between 1980 and 2007 is 235 million; a total weight of 2.25 million tons.
    Where are these 235 million units now? Eighteen percent of these products were
    collected for recycling; the rest are, unfortunately, sitting in landfills.
    Toxins (lead, mercury, flame retardants, and the like) from these electronics
    can seep into the soil and ground water, posing serious health and
    environmental
    risks.
Jack Olmsted

E-Cycle: We got to move these color TVs ... | Yakima Herald-Republic Online - 0 views

  •  
    YAKIMA, Wash. -- In its first month, Washington's new electronics recycling program has collected more than three million pounds of waste -- 20 percent to 30 percent more than expected.

    Although pleased with the program's success, regulators of
    E-Cycle Washington are asking people to wait a few months to drop off their electronics so collection sites can catch up with demand.

    "Response has been good, but there are some capacity issues," said John Friedrick, director of the Washington Materials Management and Financing Authority, which oversees the recycling network. "I anticipated there would be a lot more problems, but there haven't been. Overall, I'm very happy with it."
Jack Olmsted

KWCH - Kansas News and Weather - Problems Hamper Sedgwick County E-Waste Event - 0 views

  •  
    People began lining up early Saturday morning to recycle their used
    electronics. In fact, so many came out to Sedgwick County's 'E-Waste' collection
    drive, organizers ran into problems.

    Several people called the Eyewitness Newsroom complaining about long lines.
    Organizers report at least 1,400 vehicles coming through the checkpoints at the
    Kansas Coliseum. They had expected 1,000. Reporter Kim Hynes reports see at
    least one accident.
Jack Olmsted

The Wenatchee World Online - Talking trash: Remember to e-cycle e-waste - 0 views

  •  
    Let's talk about electronic waste, better known as
    e-waste.








    STORY TOOLS









































    Years ago, if a toy or appliance broke, your mom or dad would
    try to fix it, often with mixed results. But few people understand how
    e-products work, much less how to fix them.

    When televisions and computers first came out, old ones were
    often passed down to relatives, charities or to schools. But now, lower prices
    and rapid development in technology are sending more and more televisions and
    computers to the e-waste trash heap.

    Just how many?

    In 1970, the average household in Washington averaged one
    television set per household, and personal computers were unheard of.

    The Department of Ecology estimates that by the end of 2008
    there will be one television for every person in the state and even more
    computers than people.
Jack Olmsted

LAWMAKER AIMS TO TWEAK ELECTRONICS RECYCLING LAWLAWMAKER AIMS TO TWEAK ELECTRONICS RECY... - 0 views

  •  

    Rep. Zack Hudgins,
    D-Seattle, says a state law that just went into effect to encourage recycling of
    electronics needs some tinkering to make sure it doesn't inadvertently bankrupt
    businesses that fix old computers. Hudgins' South Seattle district includes
    several computer-refurbishing shops. The law went into effect yesterday. It
    allows consumers to recycle computers, computer monitors, laptops and TVs for
    free. It is being hailed as groundbreaking nationally because it marks the first
    time a state has forced electronics manufacturers to pay the entire cost of the
    recycling. But there's a big problem with the law, according to
    environmentalists as well as the computer refurbishers. They say it puts a big
    hurdle in the way of the computer rebuilders. So Hudgins says he is drafting
    legislation in an attempt to fix the problem. The legislation would allow
    nonprofit groups to fix perhaps 500 to 1,000 computers per year for resale to
    the public.
Jack Olmsted

E-Cycle Washington Coordinates Collection | Environmental Protection - 0 views

  •  
    E-Cycle Washington, a new program that started on Jan. 1, allows free and
    convenient recycling of TVs, desktop and laptop computers, and monitors only,
    according to a Jan. 12 press release.

    The makers of these products are providing about 200 collection sites around
    the state. State residents, small businesses, school districts, small government
    agencies, and charities can bring these electronic items to the sites.

    The program is
Jack Olmsted

Lawmaker aims to tweak electronics recycling law - 0 views

  •  
    A state law that just went into effect to encourage recycling of electronics
    needs some tinkering to make sure it doesn't inadvertently bankrupt businesses
    that fix old computers, says a state legislator whose South Seattle district
    includes several computer-refurbishing shops.

    The law allows consumers to recycle computers, computer monitors, laptops and
    TVs for free. In effect as of Thursday, it is being hailed as groundbreaking
    nationally because it marks the first time a state has forced electronics
    manufacturers to pay the entire cost of the recycling.

    But there's a big problem with the law, according to environmentalists as
    well as the computer refurbishers: It puts a big hurdle in the way of the
    computer rebuilders.
Jack Olmsted

KNDO/KNDU Tri-Cities, Yakima, WA | E-Recyle Your Electronics - 0 views

  •  
    Richland, Wash-- If
    you have an old
    T.V. or computer to get rid of think, before you put it in
    your garbage. It's not illegal for households to put electronics in their trash,
    but it could be dangerous for ground water around landfills.

    All
    businesses are required to E-Cycle their electronics.
    If you take your
    electronics to the Richland Landfill they will dispose them for free.
    They
    have already shipped six truck loads so far.
Jack Olmsted

KXLY.com: News, Weather and Sports for Spokane, WA and Coeur d'Alene, ID | Got an old T... - 0 views

  •  
    SPOKANE -- If you have old electronics collecting dust at home there's a free
    and green way in Washington now to get rid of all that unwanted clutter.

    Many of the electronics people use on a daily basis contain lead and mercury
    making it harmful to just toss them into a landfill. That's why a new state law
    requires makers of televisions, computers, laptops, and monitors to provide free
    e-cycling facilities.
Jack Olmsted

Where to e-cycle on the North Olympic Peninsula - 0 views

  •  
    FREE RECYCLING OF television sets, laptop and desktop
    computers and monitors is available in Jefferson and Clallam counties, thanks to
    the state's new E-Cycle Washington program.
    That means no one needs to
    throw away such gear and add to already stuffed landfills.
    Households,
    businesses, school districts, government agencies and nonprofit groups can take
    advantage of the free program.
Jack Olmsted

About Great Green Gadgets | greatgreengadgets.com - 0 views

  •  
    Great Green Gadget's main purpose is to find interesting articles on the web
    about gadgets, big and small, that promote environmental concerns. Our value is
    that we provide the best links and information- by doing this service we help to
    weed out less useful search engine results and provide useful research that help
    to better understand an issue. Or perhaps you will just marvel at some new
    eco-friendly device.
Jack Olmsted

Reduce, Reuse, E-cycle « Choose MOGO - 0 views

  •  
    E-waste has been in the news a lot lately, with the 60 Minutes expose on toxic electronic waste illegally shipped to other countries, and reports from organizations like the Silicon Valley Toxics Coalition, who recently traveled to India to track the global e-waste crisis. People are starting to pay more attention to where their electronics go when we lose interest in them.
Jack Olmsted

E-Cycle Washington brings free recycling of TVs, monitors and computers - 0 views

  •  
    OLYMPIA - If you're wondering what to do with those unwanted TVs, computers
    and monitors stored in a garage or back-room, relief is here. E-Cycle Washington
    is a new program that started on Jan. 1. It allows free and convenient recycling
    of these electronic products.

    The makers of these products are providing about 200 collection sites around
    the state. State residents, small businesses, school districts, small government
    agencies and charities can bring television sets, computers (desktop and laptop)
    and monitors to these sites to be recycled. They will pay no fee for this
    service.

    There is no need to rush out this weekend - or even this month. E-Cycle
    Washington is a permanent and ongoing addition to current recycling
    opportunities available to Washington residents. Many collection sites will be
    open several days a week and some will be open every day. And the collection
    network will be continuously improved to meet the needs of the public.
Jack Olmsted

reviewjournal.com -- PRESS RELEASES - 0 views

  •  
    Wal-Mart joins statewide campaign to help consumers recycle e-waste
    free-of-charge
    KIRKLAND, Wash., Jan. 8 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Lucky recipients of a
    new TV, laptop or monitor for Christmas will have a new way to recycle
    their old equipment starting next week in Washington State. Effective
    January 1st of 2009, residents will be able to recycle computers, monitors,
    laptops and TVs through the new E-Cycle Washington program free of charge.
    The permanent program is funded by electronic manufacturers and there is no
    time limit for bringing in unwanted electronics for recycling.
Jack Olmsted

Technology News: Mobile Tech: Responsible E-Disposal: Attacking the E-Waste Blight - 0 views

  •  
    The winter holidays are over, and brittle Christmas trees and empty champagne bottles aren't alone in many consumers' trash heaps. There are also used computers, televisions, cell phones and other gizmos that have been replaced with fancier models.

    Those piles may be somewhat larger than in recent years, thanks to the imminent U.S. government-mandated changeover from analog to digital television broadcasting. The switch, which is slated for February, has prompted many consumers to flock to retailers for new sets.

    American households have, on average, about 24 consumer electronics products, according the Consumer Electronics Association.
    The winter holidays are over, and brittle Christmas trees and empty champagne bottles aren't alone in many consumers' trash heaps. There are also used computers, televisions, cell phones and other gizmos that have been replaced with fancier models.

    Those piles may be somewhat larger than in recent years, thanks to the imminent U.S. government-mandated changeover from analog to digital television broadcasting. The switch, which is slated for February, has prompted many consumers to flock to retailers for new sets.

    American households have, on average, about 24 consumer electronics products, according the Consumer Electronics Association.
Jack Olmsted

The e-Stewards Initiative : The globally responsible way to recycle your electronics! - 0 views

  •  
    The e-Stewards recyclers are a group of leading North American electronics recyclers and asset managers who have been qualified as upholding the highest standard of environmental and social responsibility. Environmental and social justice advocates urge you to make use of these recyclers for all of your e-waste disposal/recycling/asset management. Beware other recyclers claiming to be "green" and responsible. The e-Stewards recyclers are a group of leading North American electronics recyclers and asset managers who have been qualified as upholding the highest standard of environmental and social responsibility. Environmental and social justice advocates urge you to make use of these recyclers for all of your e-waste disposal/recycling/asset management. Beware other recyclers claiming to be "green" and responsible.
Jack Olmsted

e-Stewards Announces Big News for e-Waste Recyclers : TreeHugger - 0 views

  •  
    Recycling indeed
    feels
    like a big scam
    . Zero waste is our ultimate goal. And yet, in the mean time,
    we have to be sure we can trust who it is we're taking our e-waste to since we
    are taking the time and care not to
    dump
    the toxic junk in a landfill
    in the first place
Jack Olmsted

Real Estate Blog - E-Cycle Washington & US - 0 views

  •  
    Keeping it Green




    E-Cycle
    Washington

    -
    Households, nonprofits and small businesses can recycle televisions, computers,
    monitors and portable computers FREE - (
    see restrictions
    )
Jack Olmsted

Don't Dump Toxic Electronics ... E-Cycle | TriCities - 0 views

  •  
    BRISTOL, Va. - There's a flip side to that newfangled cell phone found under
    the Christmas tree. Sooner or later, the outdated cell phones clogging the
    kitchen drawer have to go.

    However, when they do go, don't forget that those electronic beeps and
    whistles are powered by mercury, cadmium, lead and other toxic metals destined
    to seep into, and out of, a landfill. And toxic metals, such as mercury, can
    cause brain and kidney damage, as well as cancer, when released into the ground
    and air, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality reports.

    So, instead of dumping outdated gadgets and gizmos into the trash can,
    environmental and industry leaders recommend recycling, which, in the case of
    electronics, is known as e-cycling.

    For nearly six years, Bristol Virginia Public Works has picked up laptops,
    monitors and even fluorescent light tubes left in marked boxes by the curb. As
    part of a statewide e-cycling effort, the technology is carted off during
    regular pickups.
Jack Olmsted

Electronics recycling free in state Electronics recycling free in state - 0 views

  •  
    WALLA WALLA -- If your New Year's resolution involves
    tossing an old computer or television set, you're in luck.
    A new state-sponsored program, E-Cycle Washington, begins
    this year to allow recycling of certain electronic items free of charge. Items
    covered by the program are computers, televisions, laptops and monitors,
    although some businesses may accept other items as well. The program is open to
    private citizens, nonprofits and businesses with fewer than 50
    employees.
    Two local companies participating in the program are CEP
    Recycle and Walla Walla Recycling.
1 - 20 of 42 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page