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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Theron DesRosier

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The Future of Work: As Gartner Sees It - 3 views

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    "Gartner points out that the world of work will probably witness ten major changes in the next ten years. Interesting in that it will change how learning happens in the workplace as well. The eLearning industry will need to account for the coming change and have a strategy in place to deal with the changes."
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Assessing Learning Outcomes at the University of Cincinnati: Comparing Rubric Assessmen... - 2 views

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    "When the CLA results arrived eight months later, the UC team compared the outcomes of the two assessments. "We found no statistically significant correlation between the CLA scores and the portfolio scores," Escoe says. "In some ways, it's a disappointing finding. If we'd found a correlation, we could tell faculty that the CLA, as an instrument, is measuring the same things that we value and that the CLA can be embedded in a course. But that didn't happen." There were many factors that may have contributed to the lack of correlation, she says, including the fact that the CLA is timed, while the rubric assignments are not; and that the rubric scores were diagnostic and included specific feedback, while the CLA awarded points "in a black box": if a student referred to a specific piece of evidence in a critical-thinking question, he or she simply received one point. In addition, she says, faculty members may have had exceptionally high expectations of their honors students and assessed the e-portfolios with those high expectations in mind-leading to results that would not correlate to a computer-scored test. In the end, Escoe says, the two assessments are both useful, but for different things. The CLA can provide broad institutional data that satisfies VSA requirements, while rubric-based assessment provides better information to facilitate continuous program improvement. "
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    Another institution trying to make sense of the CLA.

    This study compared student's CLA scores with criteria-based scores of their eportfolios. The study used a modified version of the VALUE rubrics developed by the AACU. Our own Gary Brown was on the team that developed the critical thinking rubric for the VALUE project.
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the creative internet (106 things) - 1 views

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    The world is full of interesting things. Use google chrome for this if possible. It will take a little time to download but it has a lot of creative material worth viewing.
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Disaggregate power not people - Part two: now with more manifesto @ Dave's Educational ... - 2 views

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    "Definition 2 - disaggregating power
    There is a very different power relationship between being given a space which 'enables contexts' and 'allows supports' for a user and a space that you build and support for yourself. It dodges those institutionally created problems of student mobility, of losing the connections formed in your learning and gives you a professional 'place' from which you can start to make long term knowledge network connections that form the higher end of the productive learning/knowing that is possible on the web. The power is disaggregated in the sense that while attending an institution of learning you are still under the dominance of the instructor or the regulations surrounding accreditation, but coming to your learning space is not about that dominance. The power held (and, i should probably add, that you've given to that institution in applying for accreditation/learning it's not (necessarily) a power of tyranny) by the institution only touches some of your work, and it need not impede any work you choose to do.

    Here's where I get to the part about the 'personal' that's been bothering me
    The danger in taking definition two as our definition for PLE is that we lose sight of the subtle, complex dance of person and ecology so eloquently described by Keith Hamon in his response to my post. Maybe more dangerously, we might get taken up as thinking that learning is something that happens to the person, and not as part of a complex rhizome of connections that form the basis of the human experience.

    Learning (and I don't mean definitions or background) and the making of connections of knowledge is something that is steeped in complexity. At each point we are structured in the work (written in a book, sung in a song, spoken in a web session) of others that constantly tests our own connections and further complexifies our understanding. This is the pattern of knowledge as i understand it. It is organic, and messy, and su
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#3m10p - 1 views

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    3M10P is a university project in which 10 students work for 3 months with the (*) goal of writing 10 academic journal papers.

    The project started on 2010-09-01 and will run until 2010-12-01. On the way, we will need to upset the academic publishing applecart quite a bit: attracting peer commentary on the drafts as they get written, pushing the limits of text re-use between papers and questioning the status of author. This is play, but this is very serious play."
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Tertiary21: 21st Century Assessment: The University of Farmville - 0 views

  • Carnegie Mellon University Professor Jesse Schell's talk on the future of gaming is thought provoking. It gives some interesting insights into what educational assessment might look like by mid 21st Century.
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    An interesting perspective on the future of assessment using the analogy of game design.
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Debate Over P vs. NP Proof Highlights Web Collaboration - NYTimes.com - 1 views

  • The potential of Internet-based collaboration was vividly demonstrated this month when complexity theorists used blogs and wikis to pounce on a claimed proof for one of the most profound and difficult problems facing mathematicians and computer scientists.
  • “The proof required the piecing together of principles from multiple areas within mathematics. The major effort in constructing this proof was uncovering a chain of conceptual links between various fields and viewing them through a common lens.”

  • In this case, however, the significant breakthrough may not be in the science, but rather in the way science is practiced.
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  • What was highly significant, however, was the pace of discussion and analysis, carried out in real time on blogs and a wiki that had been quickly set up for the purpose of collectively analyzing the paper.
  • Several of the researchers said that until now such proofs had been hashed out in colloquiums that required participants to be physically present at an appointed time. Now, with the emergence of Web-connected software programs it is possible for such collaborative undertakings to harness the brainpower of the world’s best thinkers on a continuous basis.
  • collaborative tools is paving the way for a second scientific revolution in the same way the printing press created a demarcation between the age of alchemy and the age of chemistry.
  • “The difference between the alchemists and the chemists was that the printing press was used to coordinate peer review,” he said. “The printing press didn’t cause the scientific revolution, but it wouldn’t have been possible without it.”
  • “It’s not just, ‘Hey, everybody, look at this,’ ” he said, “but rather a new set of norms is emerging about what it means to do mathematics, assuming coordinated participation.”
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    "The difference between the alchemists and the chemists was that the printing press was used to coordinate peer review," he said. "The printing press didn't cause the scientific revolution, but it wouldn't have been possible without it."

    "The difference between the alchemists and the chemists was that the printing press was used to coordinate peer review," he said. "The printing press didn't cause the scientific revolution, but it wouldn't have been possible without it."
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Learning from The Wisdom of Crowds | Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching - 1 views

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    In The New York Times article, "Scholars Test Web Alternative to Peer Review," Patricia Cohen writes that some humanities scholars are arguing "that in an era of digital media there is a better way to assess the quality of work. Instead of relying on a few experts selected by leading publications, they advocate using the Internet to expose scholarly thinking to the swift collective judgment of a much broader interested audience."
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Envisioning the Post-LMS Era: The Open Learning Network (EDUCAUSE Quarterly) | EDUCAUSE - 3 views

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    A featured article in Educause Quarterly contains this quote:
    "The importance of authentic, web-enabled learner assessment is clearly behind Caulfield's notion of "loosely coupled assessment" (first coined in a blog post by Mike Caulfield July 31, 2007) and WSU's harvesting gradebook project, with which we claim shared intellectual roots."
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Engaging Departments: Assessing Student Learning, Peer Review single issue - 1 views

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    "Description
    This issue explores how departments are developing assessment approaches that deepen student learning. Recognizing that most faculty identify strongly with their discipline and that students are engaged in more complex and sophisticated practice of liberal learning as they complete their majors, the issue presents articles that advance integrative and engaged learning in and across disciplines. The features draw on sessions and presentations from AAC&U's 2009 Engaging Departments Institute.
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    A pdf download is available on this page.
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Documenting and decoding the undergrad experience | University Affairs - 3 views

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    "An official transcript shows how well a student did in class, but universities have long recognized that a lot of learning takes place outside the classroom. Now a growing number of schools are developing ways of tracking, measuring and authenticating that learning.

    Some are giving official sanction to a student's involvement in campus activities - student council or campus clubs, for example - through what's called a co-curricular transcript. Others have developed web-based self-assessment tools that students can use to understand their own knowledge, values and strengths."
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U of Phoenix Makes History « The Quick and the Ed - 0 views

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    "According to U.S. Department of Education data released today, the University of Phoenix became the first college in the history of the United States to take in more than a billion dollars worth of Pell Grants disbursements in a single academic year. Students at the for-profit chain received a total of $1,042,372,699.50 spread amongst 304,583 awards in the 2009-10 academic year."
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Searching for India's Hole in the Wall | A World Bank Blog on ICT use in Education - 2 views

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    "The contrast here was for me pretty stark: One the one hand, you had two computers set up outside which received minimal maintenance, and which anyone could use from 9-5 each day. There was no direction on how to use this equipment, but that didn't stop kids from figuring it out via trial and error (or, more often, from other kids). On the other hand, you had a dozen computers locked up in a school just a short walk away, gathering dust for lack of 'qualified teachers' to use them, and direct their use."
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OECD Feasibility Study for the International Assessment of Higher Education Learning Ou... - 3 views

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    "What is AHELO?

    The OECD Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes (AHELO) is a ground-breaking initiative to assess learning outcomes on an international scale by creating measures that would be valid for all cultures and languages. Between ten and thirty-thousand higher education students in over ten different countries will take part in a feasibility study to determine the bounds of this ambitious project, with an eye to the possible creation of a full-scale AHELO upon its completion."
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performance.learning.productivity: ID - Instructional Design or Interactivity Design in... - 1 views

  • The vast majority of structured learning is content-rich and interaction-poor. That’s understandable in the context of a 20th century mindset and how learning professionals have been taught to develop ‘learning’ events. But it simply isn’t appropriate for today’s world.
  • Dr Ebbinghaus’ experiment revealed we suffer an exponential ‘forgetting curve’ and that about 50% of context-free information is lost in the first hour after acquisition if there is no opportunity to reinforce it with practice.
  • The need to become Interactivity Designers. That’s what they need to do.
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  • We need designers who understand that learning comes from experience, practice, conversations and reflection, and are prepared to move away from massaging content into what they see as good instructional design. Designers need to get off the content bus and start thinking about, using, designing and exploiting learning environments full of experiences and interactivity.
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    "Dr Ebbinghaus' experiment revealed we suffer an exponential 'forgetting curve' and that about 50% of context-free information is lost in the first hour after acquisition if there is no opportunity to reinforce it with practice."
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Find Your social media - 0 views


  •  Get started now by searching for your city, your state, your county, or a government official!
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    Use this to find social media links to city, state, county, or a government officials.
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A Tale of Two Blogospheres: Discursive Practices on the Left and Right | Berkman Center - 1 views

  • n this paper, we revisit these findings by comparing the practices of discursive production and participation among top U.S. political blogs on the left, right, and center during Summer, 2008. Based on qualitative coding of the top 155 political blogs, our results reveal significant cross-ideological variations along several important dimensions. Notably, we find evidence of an association between ideological affiliation and the technologies, institutions, and practices of participation across political blogs. Sites on the left adopt more participatory technical platforms; are comprised of significantly fewer sole-authored sites; include user blogs; maintain more fluid boundaries between secondary and primary content; include longer narrative and discussion posts; and (among the top half of the blogs in our sample) more often use blogs as platforms for mobilization as well as discursive production.
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