Skip to main content

Home/ Groups/ Centre for Teaching Excellence
Mark Morton

How First-Year Faculty Members Can Help Their Chairmen - Advice - The Chronicle of High... - 0 views

  • Ask for multiple mentors so you can get the benefit of experts in more than one topic. Many professors are overworked and overassigned, so getting a single, good mentor can be a pretty tall order. Instead, work with your chairman to determine four or five topics on which you would like to receive guidance from several mentors.
  • Some suggestions: Find out who the whizzes are at teaching the various kinds of courses in your department and ask to meet with them. Believe me, most good teachers will find time to talk about their own approaches to teaching; it's quite flattering. Ask to be linked with someone who can help you to understand how to balance scholarship and good teaching, or how to make the service expectations of the institution jibe with the teaching expectations. After you meet with your colleagues, talk about these things with your chairman.
Mark Morton

When a Mentor Becomes a Thief - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • The solution, then, is clear: Everyone needs to start talking. Before a single beaker gets rinsed, the question of authorship has to be laid on the table,
  • junior researchers should keep detailed notes of their research.
Mark Morton

Are You a Good Protégé? - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

    • Someone who is respected within the field and has contacts who can help you with publications and jobs.

    • Someone who is knowledgeable about the university and its politics and policies.

    • Someone who takes the time to help with your studies and your career.

    • Someone who does not exploit you.

    • Someone who is not a disinterested observer of your career but cares about you as a person and is supportive -- like a coach cheering you on.

  • the profile is similar to how junior faculty members would describe their ideal career mentor, too.
  • The mentor relationship is alive and well in the sciences, where there is a strong tradition of senior researchers bringing postdocs and new assistant professors into their laboratories and grant projects.

    But in the social sciences and humanities, probably because of the difficult job market, relations between established scholars and newcomers to the profession seem strained.

  • ...6 more annotations...
  • failing to seek, find, and keep a good relationship with a mentor during the tenure-track years -- and beyond -- is a serious mistake.
  • Establishing clear communications, sometimes across the borders of age and culture, is, thus, a key to clarifying what can be asked of mentor and protégé.
  • The good protégé also appreciates the borders of the relationship with a mentor. You want to be on good terms of course, but there is such a thing as over-fraternization.
  • Being a good protégé also means learning to accept criticism gracefully.
  • A useful mentor is one who is willing to give us bad news, but a proper protégé is one who is willing to hear it.
  • Both parties must be sensitive to the degree of independence the protégé wants (and needs) from the mentor
Mark Morton

Do You Have a Bad Mentor? - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • In every assistant professor there seems to lurk a Karate Kid seeking a Mr. Miyagi who will train his acolyte to be a skilled warrior in the art of research, teaching, and service and impart pithy life lessons along the way.

    Such singular folks exist, and you may find one. But it's far more likely that you will find several mentors who, while not well-versed in all aspects of academic life, will offer good advice in one or another area.

  • Someone who got tenure 30 years ago may not appreciate what it takes to get tenure today. The young tenure tracker may not know, or catch on quickly enough, that the same mentor who is a wizard of statistical methodology is offering awful advice about handling disruptions in the classroom. Or perhaps the issue is transference: A scholar may excel at conceptualizing new theory, for example, but may not be good at teaching others to do likewise.
  • In the words of Ronald Reagan, one should "trust but verify."
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • One sign that your mentors are actually qualified: They recognize and readily disclose their own strengths and limitations.
  • sometimes when you select an adviser, you are also picking a fight, even without intention
  • So the perfect mentor is uncommon. But academe is overflowing with many honorable and wise men and women who give up their time and energy to help up-and-coming colleagues.
  • Sorting out the good mentors from the hapless or malicious is a matter of some nuance as well as necessity.
  • Not getting any advice about succeeding as a professor is unfortunate; getting bad advice can be worse.
Mark Morton

From 'Old Boys' to Mentors - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • To hear others tell it, an "old boys' club" ran universities and the academic professions well into the 1970s, and if you were lucky enough to win admission into the club, you got the mentoring -- or more precisely, the patron-client relationship -- at the heart of the master-apprentice model
  • Today, talk about mentoring is ubiquitous in virtually every field, and at all levels of education
Mark Morton

Female and Minority Law Professors Said to Need Mentors - Faculty - The Chronicle of Hi... - 0 views

  • Law schools should be sure that female and minority professors have mentors and other support to improve their chances of winning tenure,
  • female and minority professors were less likely to win tenure than their white, male colleagues
Mark Morton

A Helping Hand for Young Faculty Members - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • "She wasn't really familiar with my discipline, but she was able to give me perspectives about the institution from a different vantage point. I really grew to appreciate that."
  • an increasing number of colleges now rely on formal mentor programs, many of them campuswide, to give new faculty members guaranteed access to senior professors who can help them.
  • These days, actively seeking career guidance within the ivory tower doesn't hold the stigma for new professors that it once did
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • "It used to be sink or swim." Either you were cut out for the professoriate, or you weren't, she says. "But now you walk into a new place and it's not shameful to need help."
  • baffling task of pinning down the right mix of research, teaching, and service that will lead to tenure.
  • On a scale of 1 to 5, with the highest number representing "very important," the mean score for informal mentoring was 4.49. Formal mentoring was slightly less important with a mean score of 4.04.
  • "We try to have multiple pathways for people to engage in finding mentors,"
  • Officials at Yale University are fast-tracking efforts to shape the informal faculty mentors that is common on its campus into a more formal mentor process
  • Ms. Trower says that the more corporate mentorship mode — which includes training mentors and protégés, setting goals, and measuring the end result — isn't yet common in academe. Meanwhile, formal mentor programs do have at least one drawback: a mismatch can result in a strained relationship from which neither party sees a way out.
  • the future of mentor programs for faculty members should include outreach to midcareer professors
Mark Morton

Faculty mentoring faculty - 2 views

  • Universities increasingly offer mentoring programs that link new faculty with more experienced colleagues.
  •  
    Universities increasingly offer mentoring programs that link new faculty with more experienced colleagues.
  •  
    Universities increasingly offer mentoring programs that link new faculty members with more experienced colleagues.
Alan Kirker

visualcomplexity.com | A visual exploration on mapping complex networks - 2 views

  •  
    from the site: "VisualComplexity.com intends to be a unified resource space for anyone interested in the visualization of complex networks. The project's main goal is to leverage a critical understanding of different visualization methods, across a series of disciplines, as diverse as Biology, Social Networks or the World Wide Web. I truly hope this space can inspire, motivate and enlighten any person doing research on this field."
« First ‹ Previous 381 - 400 of 542 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page