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Mark Morton

Faculty mentoring faculty - 2 views

  • Universities increasingly offer mentoring programs that link new faculty with more experienced colleagues.
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    Universities increasingly offer mentoring programs that link new faculty with more experienced colleagues.
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    Universities increasingly offer mentoring programs that link new faculty members with more experienced colleagues.
Mark Morton

Why You'll Want a Mentor Outside the Ivory Tower, Too - Advice - The Chronicle of Highe... - 0 views

  • A good place to start searching for a mentor is within your existing network -- that same pool of friends, alumni, and other contacts who helped you during your job search
  • Since most work environments are very different from academe, you will probably look to a mentor for an explanation of the mores of your new office
  • Mentors have much to gain from these relationships as well. A senior staff member often learns valuable insights into the organization through the eyes of a talented newcomer like yourself.
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  • "An Unorthodox Guide to Mentoring"
Mark Morton

Mentors and the Importance of Commitment - Research - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • "Mentoring" is in vogue, thanks in part to the Bush administration's emphasis on volunteerism.
  • The effects of mentoring are smaller than people think
  • But if you begin to control for the quality of the relationship, how long it lasts, the level of supervision, the kinds of kids who are recruited into the program, there are much larger effects.
Mark Morton

Carnegie Foundation Creates New 'Owner's Manual' for Doctoral Programs - Faculty - The ... - 0 views

  • Take, for example, the concept of apprenticeship, to which the Carnegie researchers devote an entire chapter. The faculty-master and student-apprentice relationship as the signature pedagogical structure of doctoral education dates back to the university's medieval roots. But, the Carnegie authors say, it's time that model was updated.
  • The study recommends that doctoral programs adopt new structures that allow students to have several intellectual mentors and come to think of mentorship as less an accident of interpersonal chemistry and as more a set of techniques that can be learned, assessed, and rewarded.
  • Arizona State University that awards an annual $5,000 cash prize to an "outstanding doctoral mentor" or another at the mathematics department of the University of Southern California that places new graduate students in "mentoring triplets" with both a faculty mentor and a more experienced graduate student.
Mark Morton

The Pitfalls of Academic Mentorships - The Chronicle Review - The Chronicle of Higher E... - 0 views

  • At the height of Plumb's career through the 1960s and early 1970s, the word "mentor" was used only occasionally in academe or the corporate world.
  • The era of the mentor began in earnest only in the mid-1970s. The Yale psychologist Daniel J. Levinson, best known for his studies of middle age, had a precise definition quoted in The Christian Science Monitor on February 14, 1977: a person 8 to 15 years older than the "mentee," a "peer or older brother" rather than a "distant father." Levinson continued: "He takes the younger man under his wing, ... imparts his wisdom, cares, sponsors, criticizes, and bestows his blessing."
  • Corporate mentoring took center stage in 1978 and 1979 with two articles in the Harvard Business Review. The title of the first, an interview with a group of senior executives from the Jewel Companies, echoes to this day: "Everyone Who Makes It Has a Mentor."
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  • Harriet Zuckerman's 1977 book on the scientific elite and American Nobel laureates had shown how crucial the system of graduate supervision had been; more than half of America's Nobel laureates by the year 1972 had been students, postdoctoral fellows, or junior collaborators with older laureates, and many others had worked with major nonlaureates.
  • For all my gratitude for such support, I remain skeptical about the mentor-protégé bond and see the "Much Ado about Mentors," to quote the title of Roche's late 1970s Harvard Business Review article, as the start of a disturbing trend.
  • Yet the search for a mentor, for a safe initiation into academic or corporate mysteries, can overshadow the entrepreneurial spirit. Roche himself pointed out that mentored executives "do not consider having a mentor an important ingredient in their own success." They credited their aptitudes, hard work, and even luck ahead of mentoring.
  • The current trend toward overvaluing mentors is understandable but mistaken.
Mark Morton

How First-Year Faculty Members Can Help Their Chairmen - Advice - The Chronicle of High... - 0 views

  • Ask for multiple mentors so you can get the benefit of experts in more than one topic. Many professors are overworked and overassigned, so getting a single, good mentor can be a pretty tall order. Instead, work with your chairman to determine four or five topics on which you would like to receive guidance from several mentors.
  • Some suggestions: Find out who the whizzes are at teaching the various kinds of courses in your department and ask to meet with them. Believe me, most good teachers will find time to talk about their own approaches to teaching; it's quite flattering. Ask to be linked with someone who can help you to understand how to balance scholarship and good teaching, or how to make the service expectations of the institution jibe with the teaching expectations. After you meet with your colleagues, talk about these things with your chairman.
Mark Morton

When a Mentor Becomes a Thief - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • The solution, then, is clear: Everyone needs to start talking. Before a single beaker gets rinsed, the question of authorship has to be laid on the table,
  • junior researchers should keep detailed notes of their research.
Mark Morton

Are You a Good Protégé? - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

      • Someone who is respected within the field and has contacts who can help you with publications and jobs.

      • Someone who is knowledgeable about the university and its politics and policies.

      • Someone who takes the time to help with your studies and your career.

      • Someone who does not exploit you.

      • Someone who is not a disinterested observer of your career but cares about you as a person and is supportive -- like a coach cheering you on.

  • the profile is similar to how junior faculty members would describe their ideal career mentor, too.
  • The mentor relationship is alive and well in the sciences, where there is a strong tradition of senior researchers bringing postdocs and new assistant professors into their laboratories and grant projects.

    But in the social sciences and humanities, probably because of the difficult job market, relations between established scholars and newcomers to the profession seem strained.

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  • failing to seek, find, and keep a good relationship with a mentor during the tenure-track years -- and beyond -- is a serious mistake.
  • Establishing clear communications, sometimes across the borders of age and culture, is, thus, a key to clarifying what can be asked of mentor and protégé.
  • The good protégé also appreciates the borders of the relationship with a mentor. You want to be on good terms of course, but there is such a thing as over-fraternization.
  • Being a good protégé also means learning to accept criticism gracefully.
  • A useful mentor is one who is willing to give us bad news, but a proper protégé is one who is willing to hear it.
  • Both parties must be sensitive to the degree of independence the protégé wants (and needs) from the mentor
Mark Morton

Do You Have a Bad Mentor? - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • In every assistant professor there seems to lurk a Karate Kid seeking a Mr. Miyagi who will train his acolyte to be a skilled warrior in the art of research, teaching, and service and impart pithy life lessons along the way.

    Such singular folks exist, and you may find one. But it's far more likely that you will find several mentors who, while not well-versed in all aspects of academic life, will offer good advice in one or another area.

  • Someone who got tenure 30 years ago may not appreciate what it takes to get tenure today. The young tenure tracker may not know, or catch on quickly enough, that the same mentor who is a wizard of statistical methodology is offering awful advice about handling disruptions in the classroom. Or perhaps the issue is transference: A scholar may excel at conceptualizing new theory, for example, but may not be good at teaching others to do likewise.
  • In the words of Ronald Reagan, one should "trust but verify."
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  • One sign that your mentors are actually qualified: They recognize and readily disclose their own strengths and limitations.
  • sometimes when you select an adviser, you are also picking a fight, even without intention
  • So the perfect mentor is uncommon. But academe is overflowing with many honorable and wise men and women who give up their time and energy to help up-and-coming colleagues.
  • Sorting out the good mentors from the hapless or malicious is a matter of some nuance as well as necessity.
  • Not getting any advice about succeeding as a professor is unfortunate; getting bad advice can be worse.
Mark Morton

I Thought I Mentored Her, But ... - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • It is much better to have faculty volunteers, like yourself, officially assigned to mentees -- for when mentoring is formal and institutional, it's not seen as a quirk of personality or misread as some kind of stalking.
Mark Morton

From 'Old Boys' to Mentors - Advice - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • To hear others tell it, an "old boys' club" ran universities and the academic professions well into the 1970s, and if you were lucky enough to win admission into the club, you got the mentoring -- or more precisely, the patron-client relationship -- at the heart of the master-apprentice model
  • Today, talk about mentoring is ubiquitous in virtually every field, and at all levels of education
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