Skip to main content

Home/ Advanced Concepts Team/ Group items tagged space science

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Tom Gheysens

Vitamin B3 might have been made in space, delivered to Earth by meteorites -- ScienceDaily - 0 views

  •  
    Ancient Earth might have had an extraterrestrial supply of vitamin B3 delivered by carbon-rich meteorites, according to a new analysis. The result supports a theory that the origin of life may have been assisted by a supply of key molecules created in space and brought to Earth by comet and meteor impacts.
Tom Gheysens

Did dark matter kill the dinosaurs? : Nature News & Comment - 1 views

  •  
    theoretical physicists... :)

    Read the last sentence of the paper...in this way anyone can publish in nature...just make a good story with little evidence

    Did dark matter kill the dinosaurs?
    The Solar System's periodic passage through a 'dark disk' on the galactic plane could trigger comet bombardments that would cause mass extinctions.
  •  
    Hmm.. right.. then again, this is not an actual journal publication but a news broadcast. But you are right that the name Nature is attached to it so the journal is definitely banking on their acquired status.
Tom Gheysens

First step towards 'programmable materials': Sheet metal that never rattles -- ScienceD... - 2 views

  •  
    Very nice new concept for active vibration damping.
    I think this has huge potential for space applications
Marcus Maertens

Stephen Hawking: 'There are no black holes' : Nature News & Comment - 1 views

  •  
    Event Horizon - a modern myth?
  •  
    GR is valid on large scales and is, therefore, a simplification of the unknown GUT. As such, the mathematical solutions obtained in GR are strictly speaking valid only within GR. Certainly, the solution called black hole is an extremely heavy object and at the same time extremely small - a point without geometrical extension. The latter is heavily in conflict with the validity range of the underlying theory and, hence, makes lots of people (including experts unlike me) question the concept of black holes despite the fact that something has been "observed" which fits into this concept.

    Regarding the movie: Event Horizon might be a myth but it emphasizes what Sante said in on of his presentations: Don't use a black hole for travelling, take the worm hole instead. The constructor of Event Horizon created a black hole not considering that the damn thing has no exit...where did he think the Event Horizon would end?
Ma Ru

Information Preservation and Weather Forecasting for Black Holes - 2 views

  •  
    S. Hawking argues black holes might not exist: "The absence of event horizons mean that there are no black holes - in the sense of regimes from which light can't escape to infinity."
    Physicists will likely appreciate...
Tom Gheysens

Biomimicr-E: Nature-Inspired Energy Systems | AAAS - 4 views

  •  
    some biomimicry used in energy systems...
    maybe it sparks some ideas
  •  
    not much new that has not been shared here before ... BUT: we have done relativley little on any of them. for good reasons?? don't know - maybe time to look into some of these again more closely

    Energy Efficiency(

    Termite mounds inspired regulated airflow for temperature control of large structures, preventing wasteful air conditioning and saving 10% energy.[1]
    Whale fins shapes informed the design of new-age wind turbine blades, with bumps/tubercles reducing drag by 30% and boosting power by 20%.[2][3][4]
    Stingray motion has motivated studies on this type of low-effort flapping glide, which takes advantage of the leading edge vortex, for new-age underwater robots and submarines.[5][6]
    Studies of microstructures found on shark skin that decrease drag and prevent accumulation of algae, barnacles, and mussels attached to their body have led to "anti-biofouling" technologies meant to address the 15% of marine vessel fuel use due to drag.[7][8][9][10]
    Energy Generation(

    Passive heliotropism exhibited by sunflowers has inspired research on a liquid crystalline elastomer and carbon nanotube system that improves the efficiency of solar panels by 10%, without using GPS and active repositioning panels to track the sun.[11][12][13]
    Mimicking the fluid dynamics principles utilized by schools of fish could help to optimize the arrangement of individual wind turbines in wind farms.[14]
    The nanoscale anti-reflection structures found on certain butterfly wings has led to a model to effectively harness solar energy.[15][16][17]
    Energy Storage(

    Inspired by the sunlight-to-energy conversion in plants, researchers are utilizing a protein in spinach to create a sort of photovoltaic cell that generates hydrogen from water (i.e. hydrogen fuel cell).[18][19]
    Utilizing a property of genetically-engineered viruses, specifically their ability to recognize and bind to certain materials (carbon nanotubes in this case), researchers have developed virus-based "scaffolds" that
Tom Gheysens

'Spooky action' builds a wormhole between 'entangled' quantum particles - 2 views

  •  
    anna, this is your shit ;)

    ...and they mentione albert einstein so it has to be an intelligent and good finding :)
  • ...2 more comments...
  •  
    Somewhat longer explanation.. I am still completely ignorant on this level.. http://news.sciencemag.org/physics/2013/12/link-between-wormholes-and-quantum-entanglement
  •  
    Yeah I've actually been reading up on this - its linked to a previous post by Thijs on experiments NASA are carrying out with quantum teleportation.
  •  
    and?
  •  
    and?
johannessimon81

Water found on exoplanets - 1 views

  •  
    A few years ago we did not even know if there was any planets outside the solar system. Now we know some of the stuff that happens on them. Wonder how long it takes until we discover life somewhere else!
  •  
    I do not know what is yetto come, but I am looking forward to the "starshade" Sara Seager's team wants to couple to a telescope: "The star shade and the telescope have to be aligned perfectly at 125,000 miles away. Once aligned, the system will observe a distant star, and then move to another distant star and re-align. This is technologically speaking, unchartered territory."
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=G68sqgRhP2E
johannessimon81

Evidence for High-Energy Extraterrestrial Neutrinos at the IceCube Detector - 1 views

  •  
    IceCube detects a neutrino in about every 6 minutes but most are from within the solar system. A small number of very high energy neutrinos have been found though which have energies that cannot be produced by the sun or on Earth.
Thijs Versloot

Final design phase for worlds largest radio telescope #SKA - 0 views

  •  
    One of the feats: "The SKA will be so sensitive that it will be able to detect an airport radar on a planet tens of light years away"
johannessimon81

Weather patterns on Exoplanet detected - 1 views

  •  
    so it took us 70% of the time Earth is in the habitable zone to develop, would this be normal or could it be much faster? In other words, would all forms of life that started on a planet that originated at a 'similar' point in time like us, be equally far developed?
  •  
    That is actually quite tricky to estimate rly. If for no other reason than the fact that all of the mass extinctions we had over the Earth's history basically reset the evolutionary clock. Assuming 2 Earths identical in every way but one did not have the dinosaur wipe-out impact, that would've given non-impact Earth 60million years to evolve a potential dinosaur intelligent super race.
  •  
    The opposite might be true - or might not be ;-). Since usually the rate of evolution increases after major extinction events the chance is higher to produce 'intelligent' organisms if these events happen quite frequently. Usually the time of rapid evolution is only a few million years - so Earth is going quite slow. Certainly extinction events don't reset the evolutionary clock - if they would never have happened Earth gene pool would probably be quite primitive. By the way: dinosaurs were a quite diverse group and large dinosaurs might well have had cognitive abilities that come close to whales or primates - the difference to us might be that we have hands to manipulate our environment and vocal cords to communicate in very diverse ways. Modern dinosaur (descendents), i.e. birds, contain some very intelligent species - especially with respect to their body size and weight.
johannessimon81

Astronomers Uncover a 'Transformer' Pulsar: switching between X-ray and Radio - 0 views

  •  
    In a feat never before observed, a newly discovered pulsar shifts back and forth between emitting X-rays and radio waves. The discovery represents a long-sought "middle" phase in the life of these powerful objects.
johannessimon81

Singing stars: a new way do characterize star properties - 0 views

  •  
    Video shows how surface gravity and rotation rate of a star can be characterized from variations in its light
johannessimon81

Voyager I has officially entered interstellar space - 2 views

  •  
    NASA JPL presentation on how and when Voyager exited the Heliosphere about a year ago - fascinating!
  •  
    NASA doing a great job here - very good presentation at a perfect abstraction level. I recommend watching the whole record.
johannessimon81

Kenia's water problems resolved: satellite data help find giant aquifer - 0 views

  •  
    The underground lake is big enough to cover Kenia's water need for the next 70 years
johannessimon81

Physicists Succeed in Making 'Impossible' Gamma-Ray Lens - 0 views

  •  
    High energy gamma rays are shown to be bent slightly by specialized lenses. The effect is likely due to pair-creation close to the atomic nuclei in the material.
1 - 20 of 123 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page